Stud.IP Uni Oldenburg
University of Oldenburg
14.06.2021 20:33:54
Veranstaltungsverzeichnis

Department of Social Sciences Click here for PDF-Download

Summer semester 2021 7 Seminars
VAK Course Number Title Type Lecture
Preliminary studies
Advanced courses
Practical course
Colloquium
Research group
Workgroup
Project group
Council conference
Internship
Language course
Subject didactics
Excursion
Tutorial
Committee
SWS Semester weekly hours Teachers Degree
1.07.084 Arab Winter - Politics in the Middle East (Lehrsprache Englisch, Prüfungsleistung Deutsch oder Englisch) Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
Recent political unrest in the Arab world led to the fall of robust and powerful regimes. Calls for freedom, democracy, and political reforms engulfed the region in a sea of protests that forced Tunisia’s President Zine Eddine Ben Ali to flee, toppled the regime of Hosni Mubarak in Egypt, and led to the death of Moammar Gadhafi in Libya. Demands for change led to both peaceful protests and armed confrontations in Libya, Yemen, Syria, Egypt, Tunisia, Bahrain and across the Arab world. Social movements are often caused by the convergence of social, economic and political oppression and hardship. Indeed, this has been the case in the Arab world, where government corruption, elite self-interest, and economic inequalities are evident. In this class, we examine the uprisings in the Middle East generally and review cases through interactive discussions and course assignments. Analyzing the cases individually provides a context for understanding the conditions that led to civil unrest and exploring the new power structure in the Arab world. The cases of the Arab Spring vary widely, and the students will consider common questions to create a usable frame of reference: Why have people organized? How have people organized into new political groups and organizations or joined existing ones? What is the outcome in each case? And, what will the future bring in each country? By the conclusion of the course, students will have a strong grasp of the social and political conditions that led to the Arab Spring, current dynamics, and possible outcomes. This course can be regarded as an introductory class. Recent political unrest in the Arab world led to the fall of robust and powerful regimes. Calls for freedom, democracy, and political reforms engulfed the region in a sea of protests that forced Tunisia’s President Zine Eddine Ben Ali to flee, toppled the regime of Hosni Mubarak in Egypt, and led to the death of Moammar Gadhafi in Libya. Demands for change led to both peaceful protests and armed confrontations in Libya, Yemen, Syria, Egypt, Tunisia, Bahrain and across the Arab world. Social movements are often caused by the convergence of social, economic and political oppression and hardship. Indeed, this has been the case in the Arab world, where government corruption, elite self-interest, and economic inequalities are evident. In this class, we examine the uprisings in the Middle East generally and review cases through interactive discussions and course assignments. Analyzing the cases individually provides a context for understanding the conditions that led to civil unrest and exploring the new power structure in the Arab world. The cases of the Arab Spring vary widely, and the students will consider common questions to create a usable frame of reference: Why have people organized? How have people organized into new political groups and organizations or joined existing ones? What is the outcome in each case? And, what will the future bring in each country? By the conclusion of the course, students will have a strong grasp of the social and political conditions that led to the Arab Spring, current dynamics, and possible outcomes. This course can be regarded as an introductory class.
Seminar 2 Dr. rer. pol. Berna Öney
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
1.07.0621 Sociology of the European Integration (Lehrsprache Englisch) Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
The economic, legal and political integration of Europe is at the core of the process of European integration. In addition to the political transformations induced by the creation, enlargement and deepening of the European Union particularly since the 1990s, European integration has given rise to a fundamental transformation of social relations and the life worlds of people. While in the postwar period, daily life took place primarily in the framework of nation-states, the opening of hitherto largely nationally regulated and limited social fields and spaces has fostered increasing cross-border contacts and a stronger transnationalisation of social interactions, attitudes and interpretations. This transnationalisation of social fields and spaces as a result of European integration lies at the heart of the research on horizontal Europeanization and also of this seminar. In the first part of the class, a broad overview on the process of European integration, major EU institutions and policy fields will be given. In the second part, horizontal Europeanisation processes in different social fields are analysed, as well as the related conflicts and bargaining relations and their impact on patterns of social inequality. Complementary to the Europeanisation of social fields, the Europeanisation of social space (P. Bourdieu) will be analysed, taking as an example the transnationalisation of everyday practices, collective memories and reference groups of social inequalities. This raises the question how field-specific and space-specific Europeanisation processes are related. In addition, different modes of Europeanization (power/coercion, competition, communication and cooperation) will be analysed. Given the profound crisis of European integration in the wake of the Euro crisis, the final part of the course will emphasise the analysis of conflicts and tensions between national and European regulations, identifications, and patterns of integration and social inequality. The economic, legal and political integration of Europe is at the core of the process of European integration. In addition to the political transformations induced by the creation, enlargement and deepening of the European Union particularly since the 1990s, European integration has given rise to a fundamental transformation of social relations and the life worlds of people. While in the postwar period, daily life took place primarily in the framework of nation-states, the opening of hitherto largely nationally regulated and limited social fields and spaces has fostered increasing cross-border contacts and a stronger transnationalisation of social interactions, attitudes and interpretations. This transnationalisation of social fields and spaces as a result of European integration lies at the heart of the research on horizontal Europeanization and also of this seminar. In the first part of the class, a broad overview on the process of European integration, major EU institutions and policy fields will be given. In the second part, horizontal Europeanisation processes in different social fields are analysed, as well as the related conflicts and bargaining relations and their impact on patterns of social inequality. Complementary to the Europeanisation of social fields, the Europeanisation of social space (P. Bourdieu) will be analysed, taking as an example the transnationalisation of everyday practices, collective memories and reference groups of social inequalities. This raises the question how field-specific and space-specific Europeanisation processes are related. In addition, different modes of Europeanization (power/coercion, competition, communication and cooperation) will be analysed. Given the profound crisis of European integration in the wake of the Euro crisis, the final part of the course will emphasise the analysis of conflicts and tensions between national and European regulations, identifications, and patterns of integration and social inequality.
Seminar 2 Kim Bergsieker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
1.07.251 Freiwählbares Modul: Applied Experimental Political Science Research (Lehrsprache Englisch, Prüfungsleistung Deutsch oder Englisch) Wednesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
(in collaboration with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) (in collaboration with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Seminar 2 Dr. Michael Jankowski
  • Master
1.07.062 Sociology of the European Integration (Lehrsprache Englisch) Monday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
The economic, legal and political integration of Europe is at the core of the process of European integration. In addition to the political transformations induced by the creation, enlargement and deepening of the European Union particularly since the 1990s, European integration has given rise to a fundamental transformation of social relations and the life worlds of people. While in the postwar period, daily life took place primarily in the framework of nation-states, the opening of hitherto largely nationally regulated and limited social fields and spaces has fostered increasing cross-border contacts and a stronger transnationalisation of social interactions, attitudes and interpretations. This transnationalisation of social fields and spaces as a result of European integration lies at the heart of the research on horizontal Europeanization and also of this seminar. In the first part of the class, a broad overview on the process of European integration, major EU institutions and policy fields will be given. In the second part, horizontal Europeanisation processes in different social fields are analysed, as well as the related conflicts and bargaining relations and their impact on patterns of social inequality. Complementary to the Europeanisation of social fields, the Europeanisation of social space (P. Bourdieu) will be analysed, taking as an example the transnationalisation of everyday practices, collective memories and reference groups of social inequalities. This raises the question how field-specific and space-specific Europeanisation processes are related. In addition, different modes of Europeanization (power/coercion, competition, communication and cooperation) will be analysed. Given the profound crisis of European integration in the wake of the Euro crisis, the final part of the course will emphasise the analysis of conflicts and tensions between national and European regulations, identifications, and patterns of integration and social inequality. The economic, legal and political integration of Europe is at the core of the process of European integration. In addition to the political transformations induced by the creation, enlargement and deepening of the European Union particularly since the 1990s, European integration has given rise to a fundamental transformation of social relations and the life worlds of people. While in the postwar period, daily life took place primarily in the framework of nation-states, the opening of hitherto largely nationally regulated and limited social fields and spaces has fostered increasing cross-border contacts and a stronger transnationalisation of social interactions, attitudes and interpretations. This transnationalisation of social fields and spaces as a result of European integration lies at the heart of the research on horizontal Europeanization and also of this seminar. In the first part of the class, a broad overview on the process of European integration, major EU institutions and policy fields will be given. In the second part, horizontal Europeanisation processes in different social fields are analysed, as well as the related conflicts and bargaining relations and their impact on patterns of social inequality. Complementary to the Europeanisation of social fields, the Europeanisation of social space (P. Bourdieu) will be analysed, taking as an example the transnationalisation of everyday practices, collective memories and reference groups of social inequalities. This raises the question how field-specific and space-specific Europeanisation processes are related. In addition, different modes of Europeanization (power/coercion, competition, communication and cooperation) will be analysed. Given the profound crisis of European integration in the wake of the Euro crisis, the final part of the course will emphasise the analysis of conflicts and tensions between national and European regulations, identifications, and patterns of integration and social inequality.
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Martin Heidenreich
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
1.07.241 Freiwählbares Modul: The New Evolutionary Sociology (Lehrsprache Englisch, Prüfungsleistung Deutsch oder Englisch) Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
After completion of this class, students should have an overview of the historical and discipline-specific obstacles in sociology that long hindered an integrative perspective combining social science and evolutionary explanations of human behavior. Furthermore, students will have an understanding of the variety of existing approaches and subfields using biological explanations of human behavior, both within and outside of sociology. Finally, students will be able to assess whether past reservations of sociology against biological explanation of human behavior still hold when applied to these newly emerged subfields After completion of this class, students should have an overview of the historical and discipline-specific obstacles in sociology that long hindered an integrative perspective combining social science and evolutionary explanations of human behavior. Furthermore, students will have an understanding of the variety of existing approaches and subfields using biological explanations of human behavior, both within and outside of sociology. Finally, students will be able to assess whether past reservations of sociology against biological explanation of human behavior still hold when applied to these newly emerged subfields
Seminar 2 Prof. Sebastian Schnettler, Ph.D.
  • Master
1.07.0691 Politikfeldanalyse: Digital Governance - Doing research using digital trace data Friday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 16/04/21)

Description:
The wave of digitalization has changed the way of governance. Public authorities utilize their online channels in diverse way, e.g., announcing the policy, participating in public discourse, communicating with public etc. This course introduces technical skills to collect and analyze such digital footprints. More concretely, this course introduces Twitter API and provides multiple examples of collecting and analyzing Twitter data in R. The course will start with general introduction of Twitter's API, available data and limitations. Subsequently, participants will learn how to collect diverse types of Twitter data (e.g., user timelines, tweets including certain keywords). To analyze collecting data, the course will discuss summary statistics of interested features, text analysis and simple network analysis (e.g. retweet network). Along with the data analysis, diverse possibilities for visualization will be demonstrated as well. During the course, students collect and analyze Twitter data based on their own research question (individually or in a small group). At the end of the course, students submit a report that summarize the process of data collection and analysis results. The course is held in English. Previous experience in R is preferable but not required. The wave of digitalization has changed the way of governance. Public authorities utilize their online channels in diverse way, e.g., announcing the policy, participating in public discourse, communicating with public etc. This course introduces technical skills to collect and analyze such digital footprints. More concretely, this course introduces Twitter API and provides multiple examples of collecting and analyzing Twitter data in R. The course will start with general introduction of Twitter's API, available data and limitations. Subsequently, participants will learn how to collect diverse types of Twitter data (e.g., user timelines, tweets including certain keywords). To analyze collecting data, the course will discuss summary statistics of interested features, text analysis and simple network analysis (e.g. retweet network). Along with the data analysis, diverse possibilities for visualization will be demonstrated as well. During the course, students collect and analyze Twitter data based on their own research question (individually or in a small group). At the end of the course, students submit a report that summarize the process of data collection and analysis results. The course is held in English. Previous experience in R is preferable but not required.
Seminar 2 Dr. Taehee Kim
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
1.07.211 Schwerpunkt Arbeitsmarkt: Income and labour market inequalities in a comparative perspective (Lehrsprache Englisch, Prüfungsleistung Deutsch oder Englisch) Monday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
In industrialized societies, participation in social life is closely linked to income from work and thus access to the labor market. The Master module "Labor Market and Inequality" starts with the question which occupational structures characterize the German and European labor market and where dividing lines between "outsiders" and "insiders" on the labor market run. This is partcularly relevant for the egalitarian employment regimes of Europe. In the first part of the seminar, the focus will be on approaches to and empirical research on the "inequality of income opportunities". Afterwards, interrelations between selected social groups (long-term unemployed, young people, migrants and women) and relevant institutional conditions (social security systems and activation policies, education systems and protection clauses, family policies, technological developments and social redistribution policies) are discussed (Part 2). In the complementary workshop, selected topics of the seminar will be expanded. Students will familiarize themselves with relevant data sets and carry out their own empirical analyses using the EU-SILC or other comparative datasets. In industrialized societies, participation in social life is closely linked to income from work and thus access to the labor market. The Master module "Labor Market and Inequality" starts with the question which occupational structures characterize the German and European labor market and where dividing lines between "outsiders" and "insiders" on the labor market run. This is partcularly relevant for the egalitarian employment regimes of Europe. In the first part of the seminar, the focus will be on approaches to and empirical research on the "inequality of income opportunities". Afterwards, interrelations between selected social groups (long-term unemployed, young people, migrants and women) and relevant institutional conditions (social security systems and activation policies, education systems and protection clauses, family policies, technological developments and social redistribution policies) are discussed (Part 2). In the complementary workshop, selected topics of the seminar will be expanded. Students will familiarize themselves with relevant data sets and carry out their own empirical analyses using the EU-SILC or other comparative datasets.
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Martin Heidenreich
  • Master
7 Seminars

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