Stud.IP Uni Oldenburg
University of Oldenburg
29.11.2022 01:17:30
Veranstaltungsverzeichnis

School of Linguistics and Cultural Studies Click here for PDF-Download

Winter semester 2022/2023 136 Seminars
VAK Course Number Title Type Lecture
Preliminary studies
Advanced courses
Practical course
Colloquium
Research group
Workgroup
Project group
Council conference
Internship
Language course
Subject didactics
Excursion
Tutorial
Committee
SWS Semester weekly hours Teachers Degree
3.02.950 S Phonetic Data Analysis Wednesday: 16:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Marcel Schlechtweg
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.028 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Monday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 24/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Nils Rademacher
  • Bachelor
3.02.101 Ü Spoken English: Higher Education in North America Tuesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.026 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Wednesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 26/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.502 Ü Vorbereitung auf das Fachpraktikum Englisch (Gym) Tuesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 18/10/22), Location: V03 0-E003, V03 0-D003

Description:
Having successfully mastered your initial pedagogical internship (“Allgemeines Schulpraktikum”), the next step is a subject-specific programme for future teachers of English. You will focus on the necessities of the syllabus but also on recognised standards, e.g. the Common European Framework and educational standards established across Germany (“Bildungsstandards”). The course is designed to help you make the transition from your university-based view on teaching to actually mastering the complex role of a classroom practitioner. Since your internship is likely to take place in Lower Saxony, the most recent version of the Core Curriculum (2016) will be explored and applied to the planning process of units of work and individual lessons. Participants are expected to critically analyse and develop complex tasks but also come up with short exercises and practice sessions as a means to foster language learning. Different teaching resources and textbooks will be studied against the backdrop of scientific insights into the subject. Lesson planning and creating units of work will be an integral part of the preparation for the upcoming field experience. A critical reflection of English lessons observed and taught during the initial pedagogical internship will serve as a basis for reflective lesson planning. A hands-on approach to developing key professional skills therefore involves • preparing and planning lessons and units of work, • realistic target setting • administrative skills such as reporting and recording, • assessment / testing and • planning for differentiation. By the end of the course you should be familiar with key requirements of lesson planning and teaching as well as the underlying principles of language learning. Having successfully mastered your initial pedagogical internship (“Allgemeines Schulpraktikum”), the next step is a subject-specific programme for future teachers of English. You will focus on the necessities of the syllabus but also on recognised standards, e.g. the Common European Framework and educational standards established across Germany (“Bildungsstandards”). The course is designed to help you make the transition from your university-based view on teaching to actually mastering the complex role of a classroom practitioner. Since your internship is likely to take place in Lower Saxony, the most recent version of the Core Curriculum (2016) will be explored and applied to the planning process of units of work and individual lessons. Participants are expected to critically analyse and develop complex tasks but also come up with short exercises and practice sessions as a means to foster language learning. Different teaching resources and textbooks will be studied against the backdrop of scientific insights into the subject. Lesson planning and creating units of work will be an integral part of the preparation for the upcoming field experience. A critical reflection of English lessons observed and taught during the initial pedagogical internship will serve as a basis for reflective lesson planning. A hands-on approach to developing key professional skills therefore involves • preparing and planning lessons and units of work, • realistic target setting • administrative skills such as reporting and recording, • assessment / testing and • planning for differentiation. By the end of the course you should be familiar with key requirements of lesson planning and teaching as well as the underlying principles of language learning.
Exercises 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Erweiterungsfach
  • Master of Education
3.02.003 Review: Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Wednesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
This voluntary revision course is designed to provide a systematic review of content the lecture ang 049 covers. By focusing on skills participants are expected to have aquired prior to the end-of-term testpaper, our sessions are designed to provide hands-on revision tasks and the opportunity to explore and discuss issues in EFL teaching from different angles. Your personal views and experiences will also be taken into account in order to create a comprehensive picture of your future role and skillset as EFL classroom practitioner. Teaching methods comprise -exercises and tasks, -group assignments, -short presentations among your peers. Learning materials will be provided. Intended Learning Outcomes: By the end of term, participants are expected to -be familiar with the content of lecture ang 049. -be able to tackle tasks applying the knowledge gained. -reflect on their own role as future EFL practitioner. Formative assessment methods due to voluntary basis of participation: -self & peer assessment -opportunity for individual coaching and tutoring at the end of each session Please note that the language used in this course is English! If the need arises, however, I am happy to discuss aspects in German, too. This voluntary revision course is designed to provide a systematic review of content the lecture ang 049 covers. By focusing on skills participants are expected to have aquired prior to the end-of-term testpaper, our sessions are designed to provide hands-on revision tasks and the opportunity to explore and discuss issues in EFL teaching from different angles. Your personal views and experiences will also be taken into account in order to create a comprehensive picture of your future role and skillset as EFL classroom practitioner. Teaching methods comprise -exercises and tasks, -group assignments, -short presentations among your peers. Learning materials will be provided. Intended Learning Outcomes: By the end of term, participants are expected to -be familiar with the content of lecture ang 049. -be able to tackle tasks applying the knowledge gained. -reflect on their own role as future EFL practitioner. Formative assessment methods due to voluntary basis of participation: -self & peer assessment -opportunity for individual coaching and tutoring at the end of each session Please note that the language used in this course is English! If the need arises, however, I am happy to discuss aspects in German, too.
Exercises 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.005 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Monday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Tutorial - Sarah Kaltofen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.401 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Error Correction Wednesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.041 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Bachelor
3.02.220 Screening Europe: Representations of Europe in US-American Film and TV Dates on Friday. 04.11.22 16:15 - 17:45, Saturday. 26.11.22, Saturday. 21.01.23 - Sunday. 22.01.23 10:15 - 15:45, Location: A01 0-010 a, A01 0-010 b
Description:
“I may not know much but I do know that Europeans love Americans.” This is what Peter Parker’s sidekick Ned tells him as they set off on their school trip to Europe in the new "Spider-Man: Far from Home" movie (2019). This is just one example of a common trope in US-American film: the trip to Europe. Some US-American TV series also dedicate special “vacation episodes” to certain cities in Europe (e.g. “Friends,” “Parks and Recreation,” or “Gossip Girl”). In each of these cases, a certain notion of Europe, European cities, and Europeans is constructed. These notions often times include stereotypes, myths, and romantic ideas, e.g., sexual freedom, cheap alcohol, and old castles. No matter how different the films and TV series are, each of these representations reproduces but also constructs an idea of Europe, certain parts of Europe, and the people who live there. In the seminar, we will have a look at different representations of Europe in film and TV. With a representation-critical approach and the methodological toolkit of film analysis, global perspectives of Europe or parts of Europe and what it means to be European will be examined and analyzed. Guiding questions will be inter alia: - How is Europe represented? - Which filmic devices are employed to construct or support a certain notion of Europe? - What is represented/suggested/identified as (stereo)typical European? - Which voices are heard, which are not? What is made visible and what remains invisible? The course is primarily geared at international exchange students participating in the "European Studies in Global Perspectives" program, but it is also open to University of Oldenburg students. “I may not know much but I do know that Europeans love Americans.” This is what Peter Parker’s sidekick Ned tells him as they set off on their school trip to Europe in the new "Spider-Man: Far from Home" movie (2019). This is just one example of a common trope in US-American film: the trip to Europe. Some US-American TV series also dedicate special “vacation episodes” to certain cities in Europe (e.g. “Friends,” “Parks and Recreation,” or “Gossip Girl”). In each of these cases, a certain notion of Europe, European cities, and Europeans is constructed. These notions often times include stereotypes, myths, and romantic ideas, e.g., sexual freedom, cheap alcohol, and old castles. No matter how different the films and TV series are, each of these representations reproduces but also constructs an idea of Europe, certain parts of Europe, and the people who live there. In the seminar, we will have a look at different representations of Europe in film and TV. With a representation-critical approach and the methodological toolkit of film analysis, global perspectives of Europe or parts of Europe and what it means to be European will be examined and analyzed. Guiding questions will be inter alia: - How is Europe represented? - Which filmic devices are employed to construct or support a certain notion of Europe? - What is represented/suggested/identified as (stereo)typical European? - Which voices are heard, which are not? What is made visible and what remains invisible? The course is primarily geared at international exchange students participating in the "European Studies in Global Perspectives" program, but it is also open to University of Oldenburg students.
Seminar - Lea Brenningmeyer
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.404 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Designing Reading Materials Thursday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.110 Ü Written English: Exploration and Expeditions Thursday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
20.01.319 English for University Studies 5 - Comprehensive Language Practice Tuesday: 08:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Language course 4 Richard Dawton
Lehreinheit Sprachenzentrum
  • Bachelor
  • Master
20.01.316 English for University Studies 4 - Reading and Speaking Monday: 16:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Language course 4 Dr. Maike Engelhardt
Lehreinheit Sprachenzentrum
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.104 Spoken English: Urban Life Tuesday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 18/10/22), Location: V03 0-E003, V03 0-M018

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.301 KO Abschlusskolloquium: BA, MEd, DoktorandInnen Tuesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.121 S Rewriting History: Historiographic Metafiction and the English Novel in the 1980s Wednesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Inquiries into the representation of history are of pivotal relevance for an academic field, such as literary and cultural studies, whose principle claims are based on the idea that the past continues to exercise its influence over the present and that, consequently, our identities and our sense of self do not come from inside ourselves so much as from a pre-existing, all-encompassing culture. Historiography (and thus the writing of history) has in fact always been a contested academic field, ranging from Leopold von Ranke's (pseudo-)empiricist nineteenth-century call to represent history "as it actually happened" ("wie es eigentlich gewesen ist") to Walter Benjamin's modern insight that "all history is written by the victor". More recently, historians like Hayden White and literary scholars like Linda Hutcheon have encouraged an understanding of history as narrative and narration that allows them and other postmodern scholars to question and deconstruct history's 'grand narratives', which have, over time, come to present themselves as monolithic truths. The 1980s were then witness to the emergence of a genre – %%historiographic metafiction%% – that has since been particularly resourceful when it comes to interrogating, revising, and subverting obsolete historical truisms through literary representations that now put forward numerous non-normative voices and points of view. In this seminar, we will discuss three texts that rewrite history in this particular way: Graham Swift's %%Waterland%% – a regional intervention that juxtaposes local and global history by presenting a middle-aged history teacher who writes an alternative history of his home, The Fens; Penelope Lively's %%Moon Tiger%% – a feminist intervention told from the perspective of a war correspondent who comes to re-envision World War II and the end of the Empire in her very own 'history of the world'; and finally, Alan Hollinghurst's %%The Swimming-Pool Library%% – a queer intervention that provides an alternative account of twentieth-century history from a gay male point of view that discloses homophobic violence and discrimination, even as it exposes the dilemma of a narrator/biographer whose complicity with the workings of homosociality cannot bring him to completely dissociate himself from the very forces that produce his subjection. Please buy and read: Swift, Graham. %%Waterland%%. 1983. London: Picador, 2010. Print. (ISBN 0330518216; or any other edition) Lively, Penelope. %%Moon Tiger%%. 1987. London: Penguin, 2015. Print. (ISBN 9780141044842; or any other edition) Hollinghurst, Alan. %%The Swimming-Pool Library%%. 1988. London: Vintage, 2015. Print. (ISBN 1784870315; or any other edition) Inquiries into the representation of history are of pivotal relevance for an academic field, such as literary and cultural studies, whose principle claims are based on the idea that the past continues to exercise its influence over the present and that, consequently, our identities and our sense of self do not come from inside ourselves so much as from a pre-existing, all-encompassing culture. Historiography (and thus the writing of history) has in fact always been a contested academic field, ranging from Leopold von Ranke's (pseudo-)empiricist nineteenth-century call to represent history "as it actually happened" ("wie es eigentlich gewesen ist") to Walter Benjamin's modern insight that "all history is written by the victor". More recently, historians like Hayden White and literary scholars like Linda Hutcheon have encouraged an understanding of history as narrative and narration that allows them and other postmodern scholars to question and deconstruct history's 'grand narratives', which have, over time, come to present themselves as monolithic truths. The 1980s were then witness to the emergence of a genre – %%historiographic metafiction%% – that has since been particularly resourceful when it comes to interrogating, revising, and subverting obsolete historical truisms through literary representations that now put forward numerous non-normative voices and points of view. In this seminar, we will discuss three texts that rewrite history in this particular way: Graham Swift's %%Waterland%% – a regional intervention that juxtaposes local and global history by presenting a middle-aged history teacher who writes an alternative history of his home, The Fens; Penelope Lively's %%Moon Tiger%% – a feminist intervention told from the perspective of a war correspondent who comes to re-envision World War II and the end of the Empire in her very own 'history of the world'; and finally, Alan Hollinghurst's %%The Swimming-Pool Library%% – a queer intervention that provides an alternative account of twentieth-century history from a gay male point of view that discloses homophobic violence and discrimination, even as it exposes the dilemma of a narrator/biographer whose complicity with the workings of homosociality cannot bring him to completely dissociate himself from the very forces that produce his subjection. Please buy and read: Swift, Graham. %%Waterland%%. 1983. London: Picador, 2010. Print. (ISBN 0330518216; or any other edition) Lively, Penelope. %%Moon Tiger%%. 1987. London: Penguin, 2015. Print. (ISBN 9780141044842; or any other edition) Hollinghurst, Alan. %%The Swimming-Pool Library%%. 1988. London: Vintage, 2015. Print. (ISBN 1784870315; or any other edition)
Seminar 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.078 (Fr., 8:00) Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Friday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.02.200 S Media Literacy in ELT Monday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Seminar - Dr. Birte Sause
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.060 TUT Introduction to Literary and Cultural Studies I Monday: 18:15 - 19:00, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Tutorial - Jonah Pflüger
  • Bachelor
3.02.511 Ü Betreuung des Fachpraktikums Englisch vor Ort (Gym) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
This course aims at widening your planning and teaching skills as a reflective practitioner. In a school environment you are going to put your knowledge and previous teaching expertise to the test by checking its viability in a real-life classroom. Please invite me for teaching observations at the earliest opportunity. For a supervised lesson observation you will be required to submit a lesson plan and be prepared to discuss lesson outcomes afterwards. The aim is to make the most of your field experience. This course aims at widening your planning and teaching skills as a reflective practitioner. In a school environment you are going to put your knowledge and previous teaching expertise to the test by checking its viability in a real-life classroom. Please invite me for teaching observations at the earliest opportunity. For a supervised lesson observation you will be required to submit a lesson plan and be prepared to discuss lesson outcomes afterwards. The aim is to make the most of your field experience.
Exercises - Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.410 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Content and Language Integrated Learning Wednesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Teaching content and knowledge of English simultaneously is becoming increasingly common in German schools. This course will introduce students to various strategies, techniques and resources for teaching other subjects in English, examining issues you are likely to face as a CLIL teacher. The course will provide both practice at and language feedback on Content and Language Integrated Learning, including task and lesson planning and implementation, and resource development (using translated German-language and English-language materials). It will also look at ways of teaching English literature and culture to students at various levels. As part of the assessment, each student will develop linguistic and topic-based materials for a group mini-lesson of their own design and teach it to the rest of the group, to be followed by a discussion of relevant didactic and linguistic issues. This course is assessed via a portfolio comprising: an assessment of your lesson and materials, your own review of your lesson (500-600 words) and a 500-600 word word essay. Teaching content and knowledge of English simultaneously is becoming increasingly common in German schools. This course will introduce students to various strategies, techniques and resources for teaching other subjects in English, examining issues you are likely to face as a CLIL teacher. The course will provide both practice at and language feedback on Content and Language Integrated Learning, including task and lesson planning and implementation, and resource development (using translated German-language and English-language materials). It will also look at ways of teaching English literature and culture to students at various levels. As part of the assessment, each student will develop linguistic and topic-based materials for a group mini-lesson of their own design and teach it to the rest of the group, to be followed by a discussion of relevant didactic and linguistic issues. This course is assessed via a portfolio comprising: an assessment of your lesson and materials, your own review of your lesson (500-600 words) and a 500-600 word word essay.
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.302 KO Research Colloquium in Language Use, Variation and Change Wednesday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.059 TUT Introduction to Literary and Cultural Studies I Thursday: 18:15 - 19:00, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Tutorial - Jonah Pflüger
  • Bachelor
3.02.079 (Wed., 12:00) Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Wednesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.02.131 S Postcolonial Intertextuality Dates on Friday. 03.02.23 16:00 - 18:00, Tuesday. 14.02.23 - Thursday. 16.02.23 10:00 - 18:00
Description:
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Julia Wurr
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.601 Ü Begleitveranstaltung für TutorInnen der Anglistik/ Amerikanistik: Linguistik/ Sprachwissenschaft The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
miscellaneous - Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.602 Ü Begleitveranstaltung für TutorInnen der Anglistik/ Amerikanistik: Fachdidaktik The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
miscellaneous - Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master
20.01.322 English for Economists 1 Monday: 08:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Language course 2 Eric Ahlberg, M.A.
Lehreinheit Sprachenzentrum
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.190 S Beginning Language Learners Monday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.036 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Tuesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Tutorial - Sarah Kaltofen
  • Bachelor
3.02.047 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
3.02.930 S World Englishes Thursday: 14:15 - 16:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 3 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.505 Ü Vorbereitung auf das Forschungs- und Entwicklungspraktikum Fach Englisch (FEP) Thursday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Dieser Kurs richtet sich an Lehramtsstudierende des Faches Englisch, die im kommenden Frühjahr für das Fach- sowie das Forschungs-und Entwicklungspraktikum angemeldet sind. Diese Veranstaltung dient der Vorbereitung für das Forschungs- und Entwicklungspraktikum im Fach Englisch. Ziel der Veranstaltung ist die Entwicklung und Vorbereitung eines Forschungsprojektes im Sinne des classroom research, welches im Rahmen des Praktikums an der zugewiesenen Praktikumsschule durchgeführt und im Rahmen einer Nachbereitungsveranstaltung nachbesprochen und ausgewertet wird. Dieser Kurs richtet sich an Lehramtsstudierende des Faches Englisch, die im kommenden Frühjahr für das Fach- sowie das Forschungs-und Entwicklungspraktikum angemeldet sind. Diese Veranstaltung dient der Vorbereitung für das Forschungs- und Entwicklungspraktikum im Fach Englisch. Ziel der Veranstaltung ist die Entwicklung und Vorbereitung eines Forschungsprojektes im Sinne des classroom research, welches im Rahmen des Praktikums an der zugewiesenen Praktikumsschule durchgeführt und im Rahmen einer Nachbereitungsveranstaltung nachbesprochen und ausgewertet wird.
Exercises 2 Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Master of Education
3.02.994 S The Literary Marketplace for MA Students Thursday: 16:15 - 17:45, fortnightly (from 27/10/22)

Description:
http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/2022-23_MM_The_Literary_Marketplace_for_MA_Students http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/2022-23_MM_The_Literary_Marketplace_for_MA_Students
Seminar 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Master
3.02.058 TUT Introduction to Literary and Cultural Studies I Friday: 17:30 - 18:15, weekly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
Tutorial - Rebekka Hänßler, (she/her)
  • Bachelor
3.02.049 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Alena Cicholewski
  • Bachelor
3.02.086 Organisation and Supervision of Compulsory Stay Abroad [Anglistik/Amerikanistik] The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Exercises - Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.025 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Tuesday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 25/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.998 S Multiple Imaginations: Germany's Pasts and Presents Dates on Friday. 27.01.23 16:15 - 19:45, Saturday. 28.01.23 - Sunday. 29.01.23 10:00 - 19:00, Location: A01 0-010 a, A01 0-010 b, ((Auswandererhaus Bremerhaven))
Description:
In this seminar, we will work on different narratives about and representations of what is imagined – in different times and under different (political, social, economic) circumstances – as ‘Germany’. We will explore what ‘Germany’ supposedly is and gain a deeper understanding of it. With a cultural studies perspective we will look at what and who is represented by whom as ‘German(y)’, who and what is excluded by the narratives, what the specific circumstances for specific narratives are, and which counter-narratives can be found. The aim of the seminar is not to study what is called ‘Germany’ or ‘Europe’ but to learn about representation and perspectives of (multiple) self-imaginations, how they are constructed in different narratives and which functions these imaginations serve. In the context of this seminar, we do a joint study trip to the Auswandererhaus in Bremerhaven to explore different narratives and representations about Germany’s past and present. With a selection of texts and short films we will examine issues of exclusion and inclusion, and their implications. In this seminar, we will work on different narratives about and representations of what is imagined – in different times and under different (political, social, economic) circumstances – as ‘Germany’. We will explore what ‘Germany’ supposedly is and gain a deeper understanding of it. With a cultural studies perspective we will look at what and who is represented by whom as ‘German(y)’, who and what is excluded by the narratives, what the specific circumstances for specific narratives are, and which counter-narratives can be found. The aim of the seminar is not to study what is called ‘Germany’ or ‘Europe’ but to learn about representation and perspectives of (multiple) self-imaginations, how they are constructed in different narratives and which functions these imaginations serve. In the context of this seminar, we do a joint study trip to the Auswandererhaus in Bremerhaven to explore different narratives and representations about Germany’s past and present. With a selection of texts and short films we will examine issues of exclusion and inclusion, and their implications.
Seminar - Lea Brenningmeyer
Sunday Omwenyeke
  • Master
3.02.100 Ü Spoken English: Food, glorious food Thursday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 27/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.050 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
Exercises - Rebecca Käpernick, M.A.
  • Bachelor
3.02.057 TUT Introduction to Literary and Cultural Studies I Thursday: 18:15 - 19:00, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Tutorial - Matthias Himstedt
  • Bachelor
3.02.201 S Multiculturalism and Literature Monday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
The seminar provides an overview of postcolonial storytelling and the concept of multiculturalism followed by an analysis of a variety of literary products ranging from the early 80s to the present. Questions of national identity will be covered as well as cultural, political and religious issues. London as a hub of the British multicultural experience will be explored in greater detail. Excerpts from selected texts comprise works by e.g. - Hanif Kureishi, The Buddha of Suburbia, 1990 - Hanif Kureishi, The Black Album, 1995 - Arundhati Roy, The God of the Small Things, 1997 - Zadie Smith, White Teeth, 2000 - Monica Ali, Brick Lane, 2000 - Rose Tremain, The Road Home, 2007 - Amanda Craig, Hearts and Minds, 2009 - John Lanchester, Capital, 2013 Each text will be analysed and assessed with regard to its suitability for classroom use. Excerpts from textbook units along with the accompanying tasks and media will be critically examined. Additional material from a variety of sources will be collected, presented and prepared for classroom use. Task design will be practiced by providing motivating challenges for young adult readers and learners of English. Recent discussions on Britains colonial past and the "black-lives-matter" discussion will also be taken into account. Relevant reading in this field comprises: -Akala, Natives. Race & Class in the Ruins of the Empire (2018) -Eddo-Lodge, R. Why I`m No Longer Talking to White People About Race (2018) -Hirsch, A., British. On Race, IIdentitty and Belonging (2018) -Shukla, N. (Ed.) The Good Immigrant (2016) - On successful completion of this module, students should - be familiar with the British Empire and the literature emerging from the post-colonial experience -know about London`s significance for contemporary multicultural life -be able to explain the role of English in post-colonial storytelling -be able to analyse narrative texts reflecting the multicultural experience -be familiar with the content and interpretation of the texts dealt with in class -be able to assess the viability of select texts for classroom use -be aware of the rules and regulations the Core Curriculum in Lower Saxony stipulates for the topic -be able to critically assess literary products for teaching purposes and, if necessary, modify and edit them - provide tasks accompanying literary texts reflecting the multicultural experience Participants are expected to: - provide commentaries on topics discussed in class. -submit samples of work -pass a test at the end of term. The seminar provides an overview of postcolonial storytelling and the concept of multiculturalism followed by an analysis of a variety of literary products ranging from the early 80s to the present. Questions of national identity will be covered as well as cultural, political and religious issues. London as a hub of the British multicultural experience will be explored in greater detail. Excerpts from selected texts comprise works by e.g. - Hanif Kureishi, The Buddha of Suburbia, 1990 - Hanif Kureishi, The Black Album, 1995 - Arundhati Roy, The God of the Small Things, 1997 - Zadie Smith, White Teeth, 2000 - Monica Ali, Brick Lane, 2000 - Rose Tremain, The Road Home, 2007 - Amanda Craig, Hearts and Minds, 2009 - John Lanchester, Capital, 2013 Each text will be analysed and assessed with regard to its suitability for classroom use. Excerpts from textbook units along with the accompanying tasks and media will be critically examined. Additional material from a variety of sources will be collected, presented and prepared for classroom use. Task design will be practiced by providing motivating challenges for young adult readers and learners of English. Recent discussions on Britains colonial past and the "black-lives-matter" discussion will also be taken into account. Relevant reading in this field comprises: -Akala, Natives. Race & Class in the Ruins of the Empire (2018) -Eddo-Lodge, R. Why I`m No Longer Talking to White People About Race (2018) -Hirsch, A., British. On Race, IIdentitty and Belonging (2018) -Shukla, N. (Ed.) The Good Immigrant (2016) - On successful completion of this module, students should - be familiar with the British Empire and the literature emerging from the post-colonial experience -know about London`s significance for contemporary multicultural life -be able to explain the role of English in post-colonial storytelling -be able to analyse narrative texts reflecting the multicultural experience -be familiar with the content and interpretation of the texts dealt with in class -be able to assess the viability of select texts for classroom use -be aware of the rules and regulations the Core Curriculum in Lower Saxony stipulates for the topic -be able to critically assess literary products for teaching purposes and, if necessary, modify and edit them - provide tasks accompanying literary texts reflecting the multicultural experience Participants are expected to: - provide commentaries on topics discussed in class. -submit samples of work -pass a test at the end of term.
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.120 S Reading Moby-Dick in the Twenty-First Century Wednesday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
"Call me Ishmal"--even if you haven't read MOBY-DICK, you likely know it's opening line. MOBY-DICK is repeatedly listed among the great American novels (if not THE great American novel) and has been adapted in numerous media and has been referenced across popular culture. This seminar will consist of two main parts: in the first half (or, rather, two thirds) of the semester, we will dive into MOBY-DICK; in the final part of the semester, we will explore the continued presence of MOBY-DICK (and Moby Dick) in post-World War II (popular) culture. Accordingly, we will discuss various adaptations and dissect various cultural artifacts in which MOBY-DICK and/or Moby Dick play(s) a prominent role. This seminar will be online. It will alternate between asynchronous assignments (in particular in the first few weeks) and live meetings (where students, however, will have the option to participate asynchronously instead of live, as well). Tentative Schedule: Week 1: Seminar Overview (pre-recorded video) Weeks 2-4: Reading weeks (i.e., read MOBY-DICK; no meetings, but there will be a variety of online tasks) Week 5: The American Whaling Industry in the Nineteenth Century Week 6: MOBY-DICK and America Week 7: (American) Romanticism Week 8: Down the Belly of the Whale Week 9: Energy and the Deep Blue Sea Weeks 10-13: I'll provide a selection of adaptations (films, comics, novels, etc.) we could discuss; students will decide which ones we will, in fact, discuss Week 14: Wrap-Up "Call me Ishmal"--even if you haven't read MOBY-DICK, you likely know it's opening line. MOBY-DICK is repeatedly listed among the great American novels (if not THE great American novel) and has been adapted in numerous media and has been referenced across popular culture. This seminar will consist of two main parts: in the first half (or, rather, two thirds) of the semester, we will dive into MOBY-DICK; in the final part of the semester, we will explore the continued presence of MOBY-DICK (and Moby Dick) in post-World War II (popular) culture. Accordingly, we will discuss various adaptations and dissect various cultural artifacts in which MOBY-DICK and/or Moby Dick play(s) a prominent role. This seminar will be online. It will alternate between asynchronous assignments (in particular in the first few weeks) and live meetings (where students, however, will have the option to participate asynchronously instead of live, as well). Tentative Schedule: Week 1: Seminar Overview (pre-recorded video) Weeks 2-4: Reading weeks (i.e., read MOBY-DICK; no meetings, but there will be a variety of online tasks) Week 5: The American Whaling Industry in the Nineteenth Century Week 6: MOBY-DICK and America Week 7: (American) Romanticism Week 8: Down the Belly of the Whale Week 9: Energy and the Deep Blue Sea Weeks 10-13: I'll provide a selection of adaptations (films, comics, novels, etc.) we could discuss; students will decide which ones we will, in fact, discuss Week 14: Wrap-Up
Seminar 2 Dr. Michael Fuchs
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.046 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
20.01.315 English for University Studies 4 - Listening and Speaking Thursday: 08:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Language course 4 Wenny Susanto-Berky
Lehreinheit Sprachenzentrum
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.210 Informationen zum Kombinationsmodul The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
miscellaneous - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.048 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 21/10/22), Location: A05 1-159, S 2-206

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.02.043 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 20/10/22), Location: A01 0-005, A03 4-403

Description:
Exercises 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
3.02.020 V Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Wednesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 19/10/22), Location: A11 1-101 (Hörsaal B)
Dates on Wednesday. 14.12.22 10:15 - 11:45, Location: A14 1-112, A05 0-054, A13 0-028

Description:
Lecture 2 Prof. Dr. Marcel Schlechtweg
  • Bachelor
3.02.510 Ü Betreuung des Fachpraktikums Englisch vor Ort (Gym) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
This course aims at widening your planning and teaching skills as a reflective practitioner. In a school environment you are going to put your knowledge and previous teaching expertise to the test by checking its viability in a real-life classroom. Please invite me for teaching observations at the earliest opportunity. For a supervised lesson observation you will be required to submit a lesson plan and be prepared to discuss lesson outcomes afterwards. The aim is to make the most of your field experience. This course aims at widening your planning and teaching skills as a reflective practitioner. In a school environment you are going to put your knowledge and previous teaching expertise to the test by checking its viability in a real-life classroom. Please invite me for teaching observations at the earliest opportunity. For a supervised lesson observation you will be required to submit a lesson plan and be prepared to discuss lesson outcomes afterwards. The aim is to make the most of your field experience.
Exercises - Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
20.01.313 English for University Studies 3 - Comprehensive Language Skills Wednesday: 08:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Language course 4 Lehreinheit Sprachenzentrum
Saeedeh Bisayar
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.309 KO Research Colloquium in Language Use, Variation and Change Thursday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.075 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Tuesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2
  • Bachelor
3.02.171 S The History of the English Language Monday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
How can we convey meaning to a hearer successfully? How can a hearer understand what a speaker means? This course aims to provide the students with a holistic understanding of the differences between meaning in and out of context. Therefore, we are going to investigate the elusive line between semantics and pragmatics. Although this course introduces pragmatic theories, it nevertheless relies on practical examples of spoken language to show which areas of natural language these theories describe. In other words: The theories introduced in this course are all applicable to communicative situations we all are familiar with. How can we convey meaning to a hearer successfully? How can a hearer understand what a speaker means? This course aims to provide the students with a holistic understanding of the differences between meaning in and out of context. Therefore, we are going to investigate the elusive line between semantics and pragmatics. Although this course introduces pragmatic theories, it nevertheless relies on practical examples of spoken language to show which areas of natural language these theories describe. In other words: The theories introduced in this course are all applicable to communicative situations we all are familiar with.
Seminar - Nils Rademacher
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.500 Ü Vorbereitung der Praxisphase GHR 300 im Unterrichtsfach Englisch Friday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
Dieser Kurs richtet sich an Studierende der G/HR-Masterstudiengänge, die im kommenden Sommersemester für den Praxisblock angemeldet sind und dient der Praktikumsvorbereitung im Fach Englisch. In der Vorbereitung werden relevante Bereiche der Unterrichtsplanung und -durchführung theoretisch aufbereitet und mit Blick auf die Unterrichtspraxis reflektiert und angewandt. Dieser Kurs richtet sich an Studierende der G/HR-Masterstudiengänge, die im kommenden Sommersemester für den Praxisblock angemeldet sind und dient der Praktikumsvorbereitung im Fach Englisch. In der Vorbereitung werden relevante Bereiche der Unterrichtsplanung und -durchführung theoretisch aufbereitet und mit Blick auf die Unterrichtspraxis reflektiert und angewandt.
Exercises 2 Christian Kramer, M.A.
Verena Weustermann
  • Master of Education
3.02.160 S Acquiring Language with a Learning Bias Monday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 2 Stephanie Kaucke, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.970 S Me Too: Revisionist Mythmaking in the Fiction of Margaret Atwood, Madeleine Miller, and Pat Barker Tuesday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
The past five years have seen a remarkable renaissance of classical myth in the revisionist writings of anglophone women authors. Whether it is Natalie Haynes’ The Children of Jocasta (2017), Madeleine Miller’s Circe (2018), Pat Barker’s The Silence of the Girls (2018), or Jennifer Saint’s Ariadne (2021) – the list is by no means complete – what their revisionist mythmaking shares is a concern with women’s experiences, stories, and perspectives. Traditionally, classical myth and their later re-narrations by male authors have either cast women’s figures in formulaic female subject positions or barely deemed their stories worth mentioning. As the list shows, we are still haunted by these gaps, even though we might rightfully ask what Ismene and Jocasta, Circe, Briseis, Ariadne, and other (marginalized) women figures in classical myth, still have to tell us. What contemporary issues and concerns do their stories respond to that continue to make them relevant? And in what ways do these issues and concerns throw light on the figures whose stories we think we already know from ancient myth, or that we do not know at all? In what ways do these revisionist storytellings converse with, even reject, male-authored re-writings of classical myth? What outlooks do the stories of and about these ancient women offer? In this course, we will try to find answers to these questions, while also studying some critical perspectives in the vast field of myth theory. Please purchase and read the following novels (they are listed in the order in which we will discuss them): Pat Barker. The Silence of the Girls. 2018. (Preferably the Penguin edition.) Margaret Atwood. The Penelopiad. 2005. Madeleine Miller. Circe. 2018. A syllabus and further information about the course, active participation, as well as some reading materials will be made available on Stud.IP at the beginning of the winter semester. The past five years have seen a remarkable renaissance of classical myth in the revisionist writings of anglophone women authors. Whether it is Natalie Haynes’ The Children of Jocasta (2017), Madeleine Miller’s Circe (2018), Pat Barker’s The Silence of the Girls (2018), or Jennifer Saint’s Ariadne (2021) – the list is by no means complete – what their revisionist mythmaking shares is a concern with women’s experiences, stories, and perspectives. Traditionally, classical myth and their later re-narrations by male authors have either cast women’s figures in formulaic female subject positions or barely deemed their stories worth mentioning. As the list shows, we are still haunted by these gaps, even though we might rightfully ask what Ismene and Jocasta, Circe, Briseis, Ariadne, and other (marginalized) women figures in classical myth, still have to tell us. What contemporary issues and concerns do their stories respond to that continue to make them relevant? And in what ways do these issues and concerns throw light on the figures whose stories we think we already know from ancient myth, or that we do not know at all? In what ways do these revisionist storytellings converse with, even reject, male-authored re-writings of classical myth? What outlooks do the stories of and about these ancient women offer? In this course, we will try to find answers to these questions, while also studying some critical perspectives in the vast field of myth theory. Please purchase and read the following novels (they are listed in the order in which we will discuss them): Pat Barker. The Silence of the Girls. 2018. (Preferably the Penguin edition.) Margaret Atwood. The Penelopiad. 2005. Madeleine Miller. Circe. 2018. A syllabus and further information about the course, active participation, as well as some reading materials will be made available on Stud.IP at the beginning of the winter semester.
Seminar 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.185 V Research Methods in Linguistics Thursday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Lecture 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.480 S Current Issues in ELT Monday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Master of Education
3.02.080 (Thur., 8:00) Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Thursday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.02.042 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.02.029 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Monday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 24/10/22)

Description:
Exercises - Nils Rademacher
  • Bachelor
3.02.402 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Teacher Talk in ELT Wednesday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.221 S Britain in the 2020s: looking for a role between Europe and the Anglosphere Thursday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 27/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Richard Stinshoff
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.406 (Wed, 8-10) English for Educational Purposes: Listening in the language classroom Wednesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Exercises - Inga Zalyevska
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.081 Informationen zum Basismodul ang080 Friday: 12:30 - 13:30, weekly (from 13/01/23), Language resource block
Friday: 12:30 - 13:30, fortnightly (from 21/10/22), Language resource block
Dates on Monday. 13.02.23 10:00 - 11:30

Description:
miscellaneous - Lauren Freede
Johanna Hasanen
Dr. Rachel Ramsay
Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.02.307 KO New Research on English Literatures and Cultures Wednesday: 09:45 - 11:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.306 KO New Research on English Literatures and Cultures Tuesday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.076 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Tuesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
3.02.140 S Communicating Science - Engaging (with) Nature: Film & Television Documentaries and the Environment Tuesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Some of the earliest documentary films, such as In the Land of the Head Hunters (1914) and Nanook of the North (1922), explore the relationship between human beings and their natural environments. Both Head Hunters and Nanook are also (pseudo-)scientific films, (purported) ethnographic studies of "primitive" peoples. As such, they demonstrate the close interconnection between science and motion pictures--indeed, motion pictures became important tools of scientific observation and inquiry practically as soon as they were discovered. In this seminar, we will explore ways in which documentary films frame (scientific) knowledge about nature, the environment, and humankind's varied relationships and entanglements with the natural world. In so doing, we will soon discover that films that seem to center on nature often say more about humans than the natural world they purport to represent. Films likely to be discussed (selection): Nanook of the North (1922) The Living Desert (1953) The Vanishing Prairie (1954) Life on Earth (1979) An Inconvenient Truth (2006) The National Parks: America's Best Idea (2009) Life (2009) Racing Extinction (2015) Anthropocene: The Human Epoch (2017) Some of the earliest documentary films, such as In the Land of the Head Hunters (1914) and Nanook of the North (1922), explore the relationship between human beings and their natural environments. Both Head Hunters and Nanook are also (pseudo-)scientific films, (purported) ethnographic studies of "primitive" peoples. As such, they demonstrate the close interconnection between science and motion pictures--indeed, motion pictures became important tools of scientific observation and inquiry practically as soon as they were discovered. In this seminar, we will explore ways in which documentary films frame (scientific) knowledge about nature, the environment, and humankind's varied relationships and entanglements with the natural world. In so doing, we will soon discover that films that seem to center on nature often say more about humans than the natural world they purport to represent. Films likely to be discussed (selection): Nanook of the North (1922) The Living Desert (1953) The Vanishing Prairie (1954) Life on Earth (1979) An Inconvenient Truth (2006) The National Parks: America's Best Idea (2009) Life (2009) Racing Extinction (2015) Anthropocene: The Human Epoch (2017)
Seminar 2 Rebecca Käpernick, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.115 (Thur., 12:00) Written English: Reimagining education Thursday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.503 Ü Vorbereitung auf das Fachpraktikum Englisch (Gym) Tuesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Having successfully mastered your initial pedagogical internship (“Allgemeines Schulpraktikum”), the next step is a subject-specific programme for future teachers of English. You will focus on the necessities of the syllabus but also on recognised standards, e.g. the Common European Framework and educational standards established across Germany (“Bildungsstandards”). The course is designed to help you make the transition from your university-based view on teaching to actually mastering the complex role of a classroom practitioner. Since your internship is likely to take place in Lower Saxony, the most recent version of the Core Curriculum (2016) will be explored and applied to the planning process of units of work and individual lessons. Participants are expected to critically analyse and develop complex tasks but also come up with short exercises and practice sessions as a means to foster language learning. Different teaching resources and textbooks will be studied against the backdrop of scientific insights into the subject. Lesson planning and creating units of work will be an integral part of the preparation for the upcoming field experience. A critical reflection of English lessons observed and taught during the initial pedagogical internship will serve as a basis for reflective lesson planning. A hands-on approach to developing key professional skills therefore involves • preparing and planning lessons and units of work, • realistic target setting • administrative skills such as reporting and recording, • assessment / testing and • planning for differentiation. By the end of the course you should be familiar with key requirements of lesson planning and teaching as well as the underlying principles of language learning. Having successfully mastered your initial pedagogical internship (“Allgemeines Schulpraktikum”), the next step is a subject-specific programme for future teachers of English. You will focus on the necessities of the syllabus but also on recognised standards, e.g. the Common European Framework and educational standards established across Germany (“Bildungsstandards”). The course is designed to help you make the transition from your university-based view on teaching to actually mastering the complex role of a classroom practitioner. Since your internship is likely to take place in Lower Saxony, the most recent version of the Core Curriculum (2016) will be explored and applied to the planning process of units of work and individual lessons. Participants are expected to critically analyse and develop complex tasks but also come up with short exercises and practice sessions as a means to foster language learning. Different teaching resources and textbooks will be studied against the backdrop of scientific insights into the subject. Lesson planning and creating units of work will be an integral part of the preparation for the upcoming field experience. A critical reflection of English lessons observed and taught during the initial pedagogical internship will serve as a basis for reflective lesson planning. A hands-on approach to developing key professional skills therefore involves • preparing and planning lessons and units of work, • realistic target setting • administrative skills such as reporting and recording, • assessment / testing and • planning for differentiation. By the end of the course you should be familiar with key requirements of lesson planning and teaching as well as the underlying principles of language learning.
Exercises 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Erweiterungsfach
  • Master of Education
3.02.071 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies [B] Tuesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.040 V Introduction to Literary History and Textual Analysis Thursday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 27/10/22)

Description:
Lecture 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Bachelor
3.02.980 S Island Literature Friday: 10:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
Islands are one of the most enduringly productive motives in Western literature. Islands can be lost paradises or penal colonies, places of exotic allure or gothic nightmares, of utopian promise or of untouched nature. You may find pirate treasure, lairs of supervillains, or the last surviving dinosaurs. In the seminar, try to understand what makes island spaces such an appealing setting for literary texts and look at a few examples from the rich tradition of island texts in modern anglophone literature. We will pay particular attention to the notion of islands as laboratories – small, isolated pockets of space, where social, psychological, or biological processes can be observed, and new forms of social and political organization are be tried out. *The seminar will take place biweekly on Fridays, 10 am – 2 pm, room t.b.a.* Please buy and read: Kanul Basu: Racists (ISBN 978-0753821503). H.G. Wells: The Island of Doctor Moreau (preferably Penguin Classics, ISBN 978-0141441023) Daniel Defoe: Robinson Crusoe (make sure to get an unabridged version, preferably Oxford World Classics, ISBN 978-0-19-955397-6) Islands are one of the most enduringly productive motives in Western literature. Islands can be lost paradises or penal colonies, places of exotic allure or gothic nightmares, of utopian promise or of untouched nature. You may find pirate treasure, lairs of supervillains, or the last surviving dinosaurs. In the seminar, try to understand what makes island spaces such an appealing setting for literary texts and look at a few examples from the rich tradition of island texts in modern anglophone literature. We will pay particular attention to the notion of islands as laboratories – small, isolated pockets of space, where social, psychological, or biological processes can be observed, and new forms of social and political organization are be tried out. *The seminar will take place biweekly on Fridays, 10 am – 2 pm, room t.b.a.* Please buy and read: Kanul Basu: Racists (ISBN 978-0753821503). H.G. Wells: The Island of Doctor Moreau (preferably Penguin Classics, ISBN 978-0141441023) Daniel Defoe: Robinson Crusoe (make sure to get an unabridged version, preferably Oxford World Classics, ISBN 978-0-19-955397-6)
Seminar - Karsten Levihn-Kutzler
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.072 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies [C] Tuesday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.192 S Plurilingualism in the EFL Classroom Tuesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Plurilingual (and pluricultural) competences are defined by the Education Policy Division of the Council of Europe (2018) as the ability to critically reflect and strategically use linguistic and cultural resources and knowledge across languages in order to successfully manage intercultural communication as well as life-long (language) learning. Foreign language teaching and thus foreign language teachers play a pivotal role in fostering plurilingual and pluricultural education. In this seminar we are going to operationalize plurilingual and pluricultural competence for foreign language learning contexts in relation to relevant European and German education policy documents such as the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages and Cultures (2001) and its companion volume (2018/2020), the KMK standards and the English curricula for Lower Saxony as well as other orientational frameworks such as the Framework for Pluralistic Approaches to Languages and Cultures (2009); we will discuss relevant theoretical concepts such as translanguaging (see García, 2009, 2013), (functional) mono-/multi- and plurilingualism, linguistic repertoire and English as a multilingua franca; and discuss ways of implementation of pluralistic/plurilingual approaches in foreign language classrooms such as mediation, intercomprehension and language portraits. This course’s assessment requirement and formats will be discussed in the first session. Key Words: plurilingualism, multilingualism, translanguaging, plurilingual competence, English as a Foreign Language, English as multilingua franca, intercomprehension, mediation, language learning/teaching, learner empowerment, Plurilingual (and pluricultural) competences are defined by the Education Policy Division of the Council of Europe (2018) as the ability to critically reflect and strategically use linguistic and cultural resources and knowledge across languages in order to successfully manage intercultural communication as well as life-long (language) learning. Foreign language teaching and thus foreign language teachers play a pivotal role in fostering plurilingual and pluricultural education. In this seminar we are going to operationalize plurilingual and pluricultural competence for foreign language learning contexts in relation to relevant European and German education policy documents such as the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages and Cultures (2001) and its companion volume (2018/2020), the KMK standards and the English curricula for Lower Saxony as well as other orientational frameworks such as the Framework for Pluralistic Approaches to Languages and Cultures (2009); we will discuss relevant theoretical concepts such as translanguaging (see García, 2009, 2013), (functional) mono-/multi- and plurilingualism, linguistic repertoire and English as a multilingua franca; and discuss ways of implementation of pluralistic/plurilingual approaches in foreign language classrooms such as mediation, intercomprehension and language portraits. This course’s assessment requirement and formats will be discussed in the first session. Key Words: plurilingualism, multilingualism, translanguaging, plurilingual competence, English as a Foreign Language, English as multilingua franca, intercomprehension, mediation, language learning/teaching, learner empowerment,
Seminar 2 Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.023 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Monday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 24/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.931 S Lexical Semantics Thursday: 17:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 3 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.172 S Interlanguage Pragmatics: Studying EFL Learners' Pragmatic Competence Thursday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
“Hwæt sceolan we drinkan?”, what looks like an odd mixture of English and German is actually correct English – just more or less 1300 years old. One can still rather easily recognize the interrogative pronoun “what” only that the “hw” is nowadays reversed. “Sceolan” is probably a little hard to decipher at first glance, however at least for German natives it should – especially in combination with the last word of the question – be quickly identifiable as the equivalent to Modern English “shall” (or sollen – in OE the “sc” was pronounced as “sh”). The fellow who phrased this particular question therefore spoke perfect (Old) English, and yet how come that it looks more like a heavy German dialect than proper English? This issue will be one of the leading questions for this seminar. Where did the English language come from? Why is it even called English? Where did the languages before English go? Was there something like an “Old English period”? To answer those (and other questions) a period of language history lasting around 800 years will be examined. The focus will thereby not only lay with understanding the basics of Old English spelling, phonology and surface structure, but also in identifying key concepts of language contact and language change and how they have left traces within the everyday language we use. “Hwæt sceolan we drinkan?”, what looks like an odd mixture of English and German is actually correct English – just more or less 1300 years old. One can still rather easily recognize the interrogative pronoun “what” only that the “hw” is nowadays reversed. “Sceolan” is probably a little hard to decipher at first glance, however at least for German natives it should – especially in combination with the last word of the question – be quickly identifiable as the equivalent to Modern English “shall” (or sollen – in OE the “sc” was pronounced as “sh”). The fellow who phrased this particular question therefore spoke perfect (Old) English, and yet how come that it looks more like a heavy German dialect than proper English? This issue will be one of the leading questions for this seminar. Where did the English language come from? Why is it even called English? Where did the languages before English go? Was there something like an “Old English period”? To answer those (and other questions) a period of language history lasting around 800 years will be examined. The focus will thereby not only lay with understanding the basics of Old English spelling, phonology and surface structure, but also in identifying key concepts of language contact and language change and how they have left traces within the everyday language we use.
Seminar 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.045 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Alena Cicholewski
  • Bachelor
20.01.318 English for University Studies 5 - Academic Reading and Writing 1 Wednesday: 08:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Language course 4 Eric Ahlberg, M.A.
Lehreinheit Sprachenzentrum
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.315 KO Doing Research in Didactics/Vorbereitung Projektband (GHR300) im Fach Englisch Tuesday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
This course is designed for students preparing to write their final thesis (BA or MEd) in the field of Didactics as well as for students interested in pursuing a research project (Projektband) during the internship of the masters programme GHR (Praxisblock) in English didactics. The course structure aims at guiding students through the process of finding, reifying, researching and operationalizing a thesis topic, object of investigation and epistemological interest as well as developing a suitable and valid empirical research design. It will also provide exemplary insights into different formats of data processing, analysis and discussion. Please be aware that this course has only limited capacities. This course is designed for students preparing to write their final thesis (BA or MEd) in the field of Didactics as well as for students interested in pursuing a research project (Projektband) during the internship of the masters programme GHR (Praxisblock) in English didactics. The course structure aims at guiding students through the process of finding, reifying, researching and operationalizing a thesis topic, object of investigation and epistemological interest as well as developing a suitable and valid empirical research design. It will also provide exemplary insights into different formats of data processing, analysis and discussion. Please be aware that this course has only limited capacities.
Colloquium 2 Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.074 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Monday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
3.02.304 KO New Research in American Literary and Cultural Studies Tuesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
20.01.314 English for University Studies 4 - Language Functions Tuesday: 08:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Language course 4 Wenny Susanto-Berky
Lehreinheit Sprachenzentrum
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.504 Ü Vorbereitung auf das Forschungs- und Entwicklungspraktikum Fach Englisch (FEP) Thursday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Dieser Kurs richtet sich an Lehramtsstudierende des Faches Englisch, die im kommenden Frühjahr für das Fach- sowie das Forschungs-und Entwicklungspraktikum angemeldet sind. Diese Veranstaltung dient der Vorbereitung für das Forschungs- und Entwicklungspraktikum im Fach Englisch. Ziel der Veranstaltung ist die Entwicklung und Vorbereitung eines Forschungsprojektes im Sinne des classroom research, welches im Rahmen des Praktikums an der zugewiesenen Praktikumsschule durchgeführt und im Rahmen einer Nachbereitungsveranstaltung nachbesprochen und ausgewertet wird. Dieser Kurs richtet sich an Lehramtsstudierende des Faches Englisch, die im kommenden Frühjahr für das Fach- sowie das Forschungs-und Entwicklungspraktikum angemeldet sind. Diese Veranstaltung dient der Vorbereitung für das Forschungs- und Entwicklungspraktikum im Fach Englisch. Ziel der Veranstaltung ist die Entwicklung und Vorbereitung eines Forschungsprojektes im Sinne des classroom research, welches im Rahmen des Praktikums an der zugewiesenen Praktikumsschule durchgeführt und im Rahmen einer Nachbereitungsveranstaltung nachbesprochen und ausgewertet wird.
Exercises 2 Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Master of Education
3.02.056 TUT Introduction to Literary and Cultural Studies I Friday: 16:15 - 17:00, weekly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
Tutorial - Rebekka Hänßler, (she/her)
  • Bachelor
3.02.061 TUT Introduction to Literary and Cultural Studies I Wednesday: 18:15 - 19:00, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Tutorial - Matthias Himstedt
  • Bachelor
3.02.035 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 ONLINE Monday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Tutorial - Edda Hagemann
  • Bachelor
3.02.400 Ü Academic Discourse: Media Translation Monday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)
Dates on Monday. 31.10.22 14:15 - 15:45

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.403 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Designing Reading Materials Thursday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.001 V Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Wednesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Lecture 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.191 S Dimensions of Diversity Monday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Starting out with a definition of diversity and the application of diversity education in different contexts, this class aims at exploring different manifestations of the term both at school and classroom level. Using the PISA results in 2001 as a starting point, national, European and multicultural values will be regarded against the backdrop of educational policies. A postcolonial perspective and the phenomenon of globalisation contribute to a more complex grasp the issues at hand. Looking at the situation in countries such as the UK or the US, home and school languages will be contrasted. A special focus on EAL (English as an additional language) and bilingual upbringing add to the topic of linguistic diversity. As a next step, language diversity in education will be examined as a broader term and then specified as “translanguaging across the bilingual continuum” (Ofelia García). Language policies as a political statement will be an important point of discussion and possibly contention. This will also include the idea (or ideology?) of the native speaker ideal, which will be deconstructed but also regarded as a powerful influence on TESOL discourse and teaching traditions. Finally, the concept of language-sensitive teaching and its impact on the TESOL classroom will be put under scrutiny. Participants are encouraged to contribute more examples of diversity to our discourse in class. Heteronormativity, e.g. as reflected in text books, could be a starting point for a critical discussion of the state of affairs in German schools. How can equality, diversity and inclusion actually be put into practice? What are practical tools for pluralistic approaches in TESOL classes? The idea of an inclusive classroom in Lower Saxony and its curricular manifestations will be amended by examples of other institutions, e.g. the British Council. In this context, different documents, concepts, resources and interviews with practitioners will be studied and critically reflected upon. One particular displacement story will serve as a starting point to ask how literary learning can contribute to a more diverse approach towards TESOL teaching. The course finishes by focusing on the question how differentiation can foster learning in the TESOL classroom. The concept of differentiation will be examined from a variety of angles and examples from teaching materials and textbooks serve as an opportunity to practise one`s analytical skills. Scaffolding is another important term participants need to be familiar with. Relevant references in the field will have to be studied in order to prepare for the final assessment. Assessment issues: Participants are expected to -contribute to discourse during class. -provide samples of their work. -pass an end-of-term test ON CAMPUS !!! (written assessment / Klausur) Starting out with a definition of diversity and the application of diversity education in different contexts, this class aims at exploring different manifestations of the term both at school and classroom level. Using the PISA results in 2001 as a starting point, national, European and multicultural values will be regarded against the backdrop of educational policies. A postcolonial perspective and the phenomenon of globalisation contribute to a more complex grasp the issues at hand. Looking at the situation in countries such as the UK or the US, home and school languages will be contrasted. A special focus on EAL (English as an additional language) and bilingual upbringing add to the topic of linguistic diversity. As a next step, language diversity in education will be examined as a broader term and then specified as “translanguaging across the bilingual continuum” (Ofelia García). Language policies as a political statement will be an important point of discussion and possibly contention. This will also include the idea (or ideology?) of the native speaker ideal, which will be deconstructed but also regarded as a powerful influence on TESOL discourse and teaching traditions. Finally, the concept of language-sensitive teaching and its impact on the TESOL classroom will be put under scrutiny. Participants are encouraged to contribute more examples of diversity to our discourse in class. Heteronormativity, e.g. as reflected in text books, could be a starting point for a critical discussion of the state of affairs in German schools. How can equality, diversity and inclusion actually be put into practice? What are practical tools for pluralistic approaches in TESOL classes? The idea of an inclusive classroom in Lower Saxony and its curricular manifestations will be amended by examples of other institutions, e.g. the British Council. In this context, different documents, concepts, resources and interviews with practitioners will be studied and critically reflected upon. One particular displacement story will serve as a starting point to ask how literary learning can contribute to a more diverse approach towards TESOL teaching. The course finishes by focusing on the question how differentiation can foster learning in the TESOL classroom. The concept of differentiation will be examined from a variety of angles and examples from teaching materials and textbooks serve as an opportunity to practise one`s analytical skills. Scaffolding is another important term participants need to be familiar with. Relevant references in the field will have to be studied in order to prepare for the final assessment. Assessment issues: Participants are expected to -contribute to discourse during class. -provide samples of their work. -pass an end-of-term test ON CAMPUS !!! (written assessment / Klausur)
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.073 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies (online) Monday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
3.02.485 Prüfungsverwaltung: Module ang702 und ang713 im Fach Englisch The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Diese Stud.IP Veranstaltung wird für die digitale Prüfungsanmeldung und -verwaltung der Mastermodule ang702 (M.Ed. Grundschule) und ang713 (M.Ed. Haupt-/Realschule) verwendet. Studierende der entsprechenden Masterstudiengänge müssen sich in dem Semester eintragen, in dem Sie das Modul belegen. Die Anmeldung zur Prüfung ist nur über diese Veranstaltung möglich! Diese Stud.IP Veranstaltung wird für die digitale Prüfungsanmeldung und -verwaltung der Mastermodule ang702 (M.Ed. Grundschule) und ang713 (M.Ed. Haupt-/Realschule) verwendet. Studierende der entsprechenden Masterstudiengänge müssen sich in dem Semester eintragen, in dem Sie das Modul belegen. Die Anmeldung zur Prüfung ist nur über diese Veranstaltung möglich!
miscellaneous - Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Master of Education
3.02.032 Ü Repetitorium: Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Monday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 07/11/22)

Description:
The revision courses ("Repetitorium") in the linguistics introductory module are optional teaching sessions and do not count as a regular exercise sessions ("Übung"). In order to get credit points for the module, students need to participate in one of the regular exercise sessions (3.02.021 - 3.02.029). The revision courses are meant to give students the opportunity to ask questions about or discuss in more detail the content covered in the lecture and the regular exercise sessions. The revision courses ("Repetitorium") in the linguistics introductory module are optional teaching sessions and do not count as a regular exercise sessions ("Übung"). In order to get credit points for the module, students need to participate in one of the regular exercise sessions (3.02.021 - 3.02.029). The revision courses are meant to give students the opportunity to ask questions about or discuss in more detail the content covered in the lecture and the regular exercise sessions.
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.070 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies [A] Monday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)
Dates on Monday. 31.10.22 12:15 - 13:45

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
20.01.317 English for University Studies 4 - Writing and Speaking Wednesday: 14:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Language course 4 Wenny Susanto-Berky
Lehreinheit Sprachenzentrum
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.022 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Monday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 24/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.997 Ü English Language Help Centre Monday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
The English Language Help Centre is open to all bachelor and master students in the English Department. Each session has a specific focus; participants can choose what they find useful and relevant to improve their English language skills. Participation is optional. You are welcome to use this course simply as a resource. The English Language Help Centre is open to all bachelor and master students in the English Department. Each session has a specific focus; participants can choose what they find useful and relevant to improve their English language skills. Participation is optional. You are welcome to use this course simply as a resource.
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
3.02.305 KO New Research in American Literary and Cultural Studies Wednesday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
This course is open to all students who are preparing to write - or who are already in the process of writing - their BA and MA theses in American literary and cultural studies, as well as to students who want to do a research module ("Recherchemodul"). Students will hone their academic writings skills with the help of various exercises and written assignments, develop an exposé, and share and revise their work in progress. The course also offers the opportunity to discuss theoretical texts central to the research projects of the participants. Regular and active attendance, the completion of all writing assignments, and the development of an exposé are necessary to complete this course. The writing tasks and some reading materials will be made available at the beginning of the winter semester. This course is open to all students who are preparing to write - or who are already in the process of writing - their BA and MA theses in American literary and cultural studies, as well as to students who want to do a research module ("Recherchemodul"). Students will hone their academic writings skills with the help of various exercises and written assignments, develop an exposé, and share and revise their work in progress. The course also offers the opportunity to discuss theoretical texts central to the research projects of the participants. Regular and active attendance, the completion of all writing assignments, and the development of an exposé are necessary to complete this course. The writing tasks and some reading materials will be made available at the beginning of the winter semester.
Colloquium 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.055 Ü Repetitorium: Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.02.044 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 20/10/22), Location: A01 0-010 a, A03 4-402

Description:
Exercises 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
3.02.021 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Monday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 24/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
20.01.312 English for University Studies 3 - Integrated Language Practice Monday: 12:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Language course 4 Wenny Susanto-Berky
Lehreinheit Sprachenzentrum
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.027 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Wednesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 26/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.077 (Wed., 14:00) Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Wednesday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.02.024 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Tuesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 25/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.004 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Wednesday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Tutorial - Michelle Kerkhoff
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.102 Ü Spoken English: Higher Education in North America Tuesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.033 Ü Repetitorium: Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Tuesday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
The revision courses ("Repetitorium") in the linguistics introductory module are optional teaching sessions and do not count as a regular exercise sessions ("Übung"). In order to get credit points for the module, students need to participate in one of the regular exercise sessions (3.02.021 - 3.02.029). The revision courses are meant to give students the opportunity to ask questions about or discuss in more detail the content covered in the lecture and the regular exercise sessions. The revision courses ("Repetitorium") in the linguistics introductory module are optional teaching sessions and do not count as a regular exercise sessions ("Übung"). In order to get credit points for the module, students need to participate in one of the regular exercise sessions (3.02.021 - 3.02.029). The revision courses are meant to give students the opportunity to ask questions about or discuss in more detail the content covered in the lecture and the regular exercise sessions.
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.481 S Methodology in ELT Tuesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Master of Education
3.02.002 Review: Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Wednesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.308 KO Anglistisches-Amerikanistisches Forschungskolloquium Thursday: 16:15 - 17:45, fortnightly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Master
3.02.006 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Wednesday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Tutorial - Malte Björn Peick
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
20.01.311 English for University Studies 1 Tuesday: 14:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Language course 4 Lehreinheit Sprachenzentrum
Saeedeh Bisayar
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.600 Ü Begleitveranstaltung für Tutor_innen der Anglistik/ Amerikanistik: Literatur/Kultur Friday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
miscellaneous 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.112 Ü Written English: Writing about Film Noir Thursday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
“How I detest the dawn. The grass looks as though it’s been left out all night” The Dark Corner (1946). The beautiful, seductive and dangerous femme fatale, the private eye, the anti-hero, chiaroscuro, low-key lighting, high-angle shots, rain-washed streets, scuttling footsteps fading into the distance, crime, corruption, death, suffering, paranoia, tragedy, unhappiness and existential despair are all characteristics of film noir, a genre of the 1940s and 1950s with its roots in German Expressionism. This course takes the example of film noir as a way of exploring evaluative and analytical film writing. Whilst websites such as Rotten Tomatoes tend to publish opinion-based reviews, academic film writing, like that found in the journal Sight & Sound, is based on a viewer’s “reading” of a film, which is supplemented by critical, technical analysis and argumentation. This course aims to develop your writing in both directions, enabling you to move from having an opinion on a film to augmenting your own “reading” of it with technical, genre-specific knowledge, subject-specific vocabulary and in-depth analysis. This Written English course forms one half of the compulsory module ang311: Integrated Language Skills. The module is assessed via a portfolio and the assessment requirements are a take-home essay and an edited version of this essay. The grade will be added to the result from Spoken English. Homework assignments as required by the lecturer will count towards active participation. “How I detest the dawn. The grass looks as though it’s been left out all night” The Dark Corner (1946). The beautiful, seductive and dangerous femme fatale, the private eye, the anti-hero, chiaroscuro, low-key lighting, high-angle shots, rain-washed streets, scuttling footsteps fading into the distance, crime, corruption, death, suffering, paranoia, tragedy, unhappiness and existential despair are all characteristics of film noir, a genre of the 1940s and 1950s with its roots in German Expressionism. This course takes the example of film noir as a way of exploring evaluative and analytical film writing. Whilst websites such as Rotten Tomatoes tend to publish opinion-based reviews, academic film writing, like that found in the journal Sight & Sound, is based on a viewer’s “reading” of a film, which is supplemented by critical, technical analysis and argumentation. This course aims to develop your writing in both directions, enabling you to move from having an opinion on a film to augmenting your own “reading” of it with technical, genre-specific knowledge, subject-specific vocabulary and in-depth analysis. This Written English course forms one half of the compulsory module ang311: Integrated Language Skills. The module is assessed via a portfolio and the assessment requirements are a take-home essay and an edited version of this essay. The grade will be added to the result from Spoken English. Homework assignments as required by the lecturer will count towards active participation.
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.082 (Fri., 10-12) Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Friday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
Exercises - Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.02.180 S Introduction to Old English Monday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)
Dates on Monday. 06.02.23 18:00 - 20:00

Description:
Seminar 2 Moss Hannah Bohrer, (they/them)
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.310 DS Directed Studies Thursday: 10:00 - 11:00, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
miscellaneous 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.103 Ü Spoken English: Germany Through an Anglophone Lens Wednesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
“Admiration, antagonism & ambivalence” was what characterized British images of Germany before WWI according to the historian Richard Scully. This course explores representations of Germany, its people and its language, and how these images have changed historically. We will explore contexts such as Tatort, German citizenship classes, German HipHop, the World Cup, the German language according to Mark Twain, and stereotypes of Germany in the Anglophone press. In other words, the course looks at how German culture and society is viewed from an outside perspective, and compares Germany to other Anglophone nations. The assessment requirement for this Spoken English course is a 15-20 minute oral language test at the end of the semester, with the grade to be added to the result from Written English. “Admiration, antagonism & ambivalence” was what characterized British images of Germany before WWI according to the historian Richard Scully. This course explores representations of Germany, its people and its language, and how these images have changed historically. We will explore contexts such as Tatort, German citizenship classes, German HipHop, the World Cup, the German language according to Mark Twain, and stereotypes of Germany in the Anglophone press. In other words, the course looks at how German culture and society is viewed from an outside perspective, and compares Germany to other Anglophone nations. The assessment requirement for this Spoken English course is a 15-20 minute oral language test at the end of the semester, with the grade to be added to the result from Written English.
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.05.483 Psychology of Music and Wellbeing Monday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Gunter Kreutz
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.501 Ü Vorbereitung der Praxisphase GHR 300 im Unterrichtsfach Englisch Friday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 21/10/22), Location: A01 0-010 a, V03 0-M018

Description:
Dieser Kurs richtet sich an Studierende der G/HR-Masterstudiengänge, die im kommenden Sommersemester für den Praxisblock angemeldet sind und dient der Praktikumsvorbereitung im Fach Englisch. In der Vorbereitung werden relevante Bereiche der Unterrichtsplanung und -durchführung theoretisch aufbereitet und mit Blick auf die Unterrichtspraxis reflektiert und angewandt. Dieser Kurs richtet sich an Studierende der G/HR-Masterstudiengänge, die im kommenden Sommersemester für den Praxisblock angemeldet sind und dient der Praktikumsvorbereitung im Fach Englisch. In der Vorbereitung werden relevante Bereiche der Unterrichtsplanung und -durchführung theoretisch aufbereitet und mit Blick auf die Unterrichtspraxis reflektiert und angewandt.
Exercises 2 Edeltraud Breiter
Alexandra Köhler
Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Master of Education
3.02.151 S The Post-Apocalyptic American City Wednesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
John Winthrop, Puritan leader and first governor of Massachusetts, famously described the British colony in the New World as a "city upon a hill." Winthrop's city established "a model of the American national imagination" (Bercovitch) and epitomized an exceptionalist narrative that imagined "the eyes of all people [...] upon" the Puritans. American cities have since often been associated with the future; however, this future has not always been defined by technological superiority and wealth, with actualizing the seemingly unlimited potentials of the New World. Indeed, post-apocalyptic American cities seem to permeate the popular imagination just as much as optimistic portrayals of American cities. In this seminar, we will discuss representations of various post-apocalyptic American cities. While introductory lectures will trace these representations to the early days of the American national project, our focus will be on cultural artifacts produced since the early twentieth century. We will (largely) progress chronologically through various media. Likely texts: Jack London, The Scarlet Plague (novella, 1912) W.E.B. Du Bois, "The Comet" (short story, 1920) Quiet, Please! (radio program, select episodes, 1947-1949) Dimension X (radio program, select episodes, 1950-1951) Richard Matheson, I Am Legend (novel, 1954) + I Am Legend (movie, 2007) The World, the Flesh, and the Devil (movie, 1959) On the Beach (movie, 1959) Judge Dredd (select comics from the late 1970s and 2012 movie) The Walking Dead (select comics and pilot episode of original TV series) Colson Whitehead, Zone One (novel, 2011) The Last of Us (videogame, 2013) Jeff Vandermeer, Borne (novel, 2017) Blade Runner 2049 (movie, 2017) John Winthrop, Puritan leader and first governor of Massachusetts, famously described the British colony in the New World as a "city upon a hill." Winthrop's city established "a model of the American national imagination" (Bercovitch) and epitomized an exceptionalist narrative that imagined "the eyes of all people [...] upon" the Puritans. American cities have since often been associated with the future; however, this future has not always been defined by technological superiority and wealth, with actualizing the seemingly unlimited potentials of the New World. Indeed, post-apocalyptic American cities seem to permeate the popular imagination just as much as optimistic portrayals of American cities. In this seminar, we will discuss representations of various post-apocalyptic American cities. While introductory lectures will trace these representations to the early days of the American national project, our focus will be on cultural artifacts produced since the early twentieth century. We will (largely) progress chronologically through various media. Likely texts: Jack London, The Scarlet Plague (novella, 1912) W.E.B. Du Bois, "The Comet" (short story, 1920) Quiet, Please! (radio program, select episodes, 1947-1949) Dimension X (radio program, select episodes, 1950-1951) Richard Matheson, I Am Legend (novel, 1954) + I Am Legend (movie, 2007) The World, the Flesh, and the Devil (movie, 1959) On the Beach (movie, 1959) Judge Dredd (select comics from the late 1970s and 2012 movie) The Walking Dead (select comics and pilot episode of original TV series) Colson Whitehead, Zone One (novel, 2011) The Last of Us (videogame, 2013) Jeff Vandermeer, Borne (novel, 2017) Blade Runner 2049 (movie, 2017)
Seminar 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.981 S Muslim American Cultures Friday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
This seminar will introduce students to Muslim American histories and cultures through diverse visual representations of Muslim Americans. Selected pieces of photography and visual art as well as film scenes will raise awareness for stereotypical representations of Muslim Americans, while cultural artifacts produced by Muslim artists will illustrate how those stereotypes can be disrupted. Additionally, this seminar will cover graphic novels by Muslim American writers: Toufic El Rassi’s "Arab in America" (2007) and G. Willow Wilson’s "Ms. Marvel: No Normal" (2014). Toufic El Rassi’s graphic memoir "Arab in America" addresses his struggles of growing up as a Lebanese immigrant in the United States and his experiences with post-9/11 islamophobia. In contrast to the more realist mode of representation in El Rassi’s work, G. Willow Wilson’s "Ms. Marvel: No Normal" is the first volume of a superhero comic series that features Muslim Pakistani American teenage protagonist Kamala Khan whose secret superhero identity is shaped by her religious orientation and whose desire to fit into Anglo-American mainstream society is thwarted by her classmates’ xenophobic and islamophobic prejudices. We will pay special attention to the graphic novels’ narrative structure and style as well as to the ethical, social, political, and cultural issues they raise. Students will be asked to purchase their own copy of Toufic El Rassi’s "Arab in America" (2007) and G. Willow Wilson’s "Ms. Marvel: No Normal" (2014). Other reading material (including secondary literature) will be made available through Stud.IP. This seminar will introduce students to Muslim American histories and cultures through diverse visual representations of Muslim Americans. Selected pieces of photography and visual art as well as film scenes will raise awareness for stereotypical representations of Muslim Americans, while cultural artifacts produced by Muslim artists will illustrate how those stereotypes can be disrupted. Additionally, this seminar will cover graphic novels by Muslim American writers: Toufic El Rassi’s "Arab in America" (2007) and G. Willow Wilson’s "Ms. Marvel: No Normal" (2014). Toufic El Rassi’s graphic memoir "Arab in America" addresses his struggles of growing up as a Lebanese immigrant in the United States and his experiences with post-9/11 islamophobia. In contrast to the more realist mode of representation in El Rassi’s work, G. Willow Wilson’s "Ms. Marvel: No Normal" is the first volume of a superhero comic series that features Muslim Pakistani American teenage protagonist Kamala Khan whose secret superhero identity is shaped by her religious orientation and whose desire to fit into Anglo-American mainstream society is thwarted by her classmates’ xenophobic and islamophobic prejudices. We will pay special attention to the graphic novels’ narrative structure and style as well as to the ethical, social, political, and cultural issues they raise. Students will be asked to purchase their own copy of Toufic El Rassi’s "Arab in America" (2007) and G. Willow Wilson’s "Ms. Marvel: No Normal" (2014). Other reading material (including secondary literature) will be made available through Stud.IP.
Seminar 2 Dr. Alena Cicholewski
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.037 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Tuesday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 01/11/22)

Description:
Tutorial - Thorben Milde
  • Bachelor
3.02.405 (Tue., 12:00) English for Educational Purposes: Listening in the language classroom Tuesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.311 KO Doing Research in Didactics Monday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
PLEASE NOTE THAT IN THIS COURSE, THERE IS ONLY A LIMITED NUMBER OF PLACES FOR BA / MA CANDIDATES! HENCE, IT IS IMPERATIVE FOR PARTICIPANTS TO LIAISE WITH THE LECTURER PRIOR TO REGISTRATION! This course is designed for students preparing to write their final thesis (BA or MA) in the field of Didactics. Looking for suitable and, above all, viable topics, presenting first ideas and subsequently coming up with a plan on how to carry out your actual research will be at the centre of the preparatory process. Candidates will be required to submit and present different types of documents, e.g. literature overview, research proposal, abstract, etc. You will be working independently outside class, preparing findings to peers and supervisors on a regular basis. Standards of academic research and writing will be discussed in plenary sessions. Students are expected to use feedback constructively and thus gradually commit to a final version of their research project. PLEASE NOTE THAT IN THIS COURSE, THERE IS ONLY A LIMITED NUMBER OF PLACES FOR BA / MA CANDIDATES! HENCE, IT IS IMPERATIVE FOR PARTICIPANTS TO LIAISE WITH THE LECTURER PRIOR TO REGISTRATION! This course is designed for students preparing to write their final thesis (BA or MA) in the field of Didactics. Looking for suitable and, above all, viable topics, presenting first ideas and subsequently coming up with a plan on how to carry out your actual research will be at the centre of the preparatory process. Candidates will be required to submit and present different types of documents, e.g. literature overview, research proposal, abstract, etc. You will be working independently outside class, preparing findings to peers and supervisors on a regular basis. Standards of academic research and writing will be discussed in plenary sessions. Students are expected to use feedback constructively and thus gradually commit to a final version of their research project.
Colloquium 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.130 S Climate Change and Environmental Justice in Contemporary Canadian Fiction Thursday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/2022-23_AM_Climate_Change_and_Environmental_Justice_in_Contemporary_Canadian_Fiction http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/2022-23_AM_Climate_Change_and_Environmental_Justice_in_Contemporary_Canadian_Fiction
Seminar 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.482 S Teaching Literature in the EFL Classroom Tuesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Teaching literature in the EFL Classroom Amongst the current generation of teaching professionals, the question whether literature – both with a capital and a small `l´- should be used in the EFL classroom is usually answered with a resounding “yes!”. For years critics of the competence-based approach have been calling for literature to be re-established as a means of fostering an education that goes beyond a mere acquisition of a certain skill set. In our digital age the number of literary texts available online as well as the products emerging from the communication between readers, texts and authors open up new types of literary discourse and expression transcending age, nationality and educational background. On the other hand, future teachers of English are bound to come across restrictions regarding their choice of literary works as well as the topics connected to them. German Abitur exams in particular require close scrutiny of the curriculum. Set texts and a variety of linguistic and analytical skills will be required to meet the assessment standards stipulated by the Ministry of Education. From primary school through to the final years of secondary school and Abitur-level both extensive reading of literary texts as well as reading with a view of composing a piece of writing are expected to be fostered systematically. The seminar aims at providing an overview of different literary texts, approaches and methods viable in the EFL classroom. Starting with visualisation techniques, story telling, scenic interpretation and creative writing participants are expected to get actively involved in classes by creating their own literary products and exchanging ideas about the viability of different didactic approaches. Other than that, everyone will be required to provide short keynote presentations on a selection of topics connected to teaching literature. You can put your name down for topics from the second week of term. Against the backdrop of current research in Didactics, participants are expected to analyse teaching and learning materials as well as (excerpts from) current textbooks for various age groups. Different approaches towards teaching literature will be explored. The development of units of work and lesson plans will be informed by relevant theories of language learning and teaching and can be critically applied to a selection of tasks, resources and ideas for projects connected to teaching literature. Lesson planning and the analysis of lessons involves • realistic target setting, • allowing for differentiation, • an appropriate choice of materials and media • as well as devising appropriate assessment strategies. Schemes of work submitted by students will be put under close scrutiny by peers and the lecturer in order to determine their viability in the classroom. Ideally, concepts and strategies will be put into practice during subsequent internships. As regards the submission of coursework as part of your final assessment, all participants are required to hand in a portfolio showing their ability to plan and reflect on lessons and schemes of work or tasks. Teaching literature in the EFL Classroom Amongst the current generation of teaching professionals, the question whether literature – both with a capital and a small `l´- should be used in the EFL classroom is usually answered with a resounding “yes!”. For years critics of the competence-based approach have been calling for literature to be re-established as a means of fostering an education that goes beyond a mere acquisition of a certain skill set. In our digital age the number of literary texts available online as well as the products emerging from the communication between readers, texts and authors open up new types of literary discourse and expression transcending age, nationality and educational background. On the other hand, future teachers of English are bound to come across restrictions regarding their choice of literary works as well as the topics connected to them. German Abitur exams in particular require close scrutiny of the curriculum. Set texts and a variety of linguistic and analytical skills will be required to meet the assessment standards stipulated by the Ministry of Education. From primary school through to the final years of secondary school and Abitur-level both extensive reading of literary texts as well as reading with a view of composing a piece of writing are expected to be fostered systematically. The seminar aims at providing an overview of different literary texts, approaches and methods viable in the EFL classroom. Starting with visualisation techniques, story telling, scenic interpretation and creative writing participants are expected to get actively involved in classes by creating their own literary products and exchanging ideas about the viability of different didactic approaches. Other than that, everyone will be required to provide short keynote presentations on a selection of topics connected to teaching literature. You can put your name down for topics from the second week of term. Against the backdrop of current research in Didactics, participants are expected to analyse teaching and learning materials as well as (excerpts from) current textbooks for various age groups. Different approaches towards teaching literature will be explored. The development of units of work and lesson plans will be informed by relevant theories of language learning and teaching and can be critically applied to a selection of tasks, resources and ideas for projects connected to teaching literature. Lesson planning and the analysis of lessons involves • realistic target setting, • allowing for differentiation, • an appropriate choice of materials and media • as well as devising appropriate assessment strategies. Schemes of work submitted by students will be put under close scrutiny by peers and the lecturer in order to determine their viability in the classroom. Ideally, concepts and strategies will be put into practice during subsequent internships. As regards the submission of coursework as part of your final assessment, all participants are required to hand in a portfolio showing their ability to plan and reflect on lessons and schemes of work or tasks.
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.990 S The Postcolonial Bildungsroman in Historical Perspective Wednesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Julia Wurr
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.111 Ü Written English: College Commencement Speeches Wednesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
136 Seminars

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