Stud.IP Uni Oldenburg
University of Oldenburg
25.09.2021 23:19:50
Veranstaltungsverzeichnis

School of Linguistics and Cultural Studies Click here for PDF-Download

Winter semester 2021/2022 130 Seminars
VAK Course Number Title Type Lecture
Preliminary studies
Advanced courses
Practical course
Colloquium
Research group
Workgroup
Project group
Council conference
Internship
Language course
Subject didactics
Excursion
Tutorial
Committee
SWS Semester weekly hours Teachers Degree
3.02.028 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Thursday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lina Abed Ibrahim, M.A.
  • Bachelor
3.02.007 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Tuesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Tobias Rohling
  • Bachelor
3.02.481 S Methodology in ELT Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Master of Education
3.02.304 KO New Research in American Literary and Cultural Studies Tuesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.077 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
3.02.311 KO Doing Research in Didactics Monday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)

Description:
PLEASE NOTE THAT IN THIS COURSE, THERE IS ONLY A LIMITED NUMBER OF PLACES FOR BA / MA CANDIDATES! HENCE, IT IS IMPERATIVE FOR PARTICIPANTS TO LIAISE WITH THE LECTURER PRIOR TO REGISTRATION! This course is designed for students preparing to write their final thesis (BA or MA) in the field of Didactics. Looking for suitable and, above all, viable topics, presenting first ideas and subsequently coming up with a plan on how to carry out your actual research will be at the centre of the preparatory process. Candidates will be required to submit and present different types of documents, e.g. literature overview, research proposal, abstract, etc. You will be working independently outside class, preparing findings to peers and supervisors on a regular basis. Standards of academic research and writing will be discussed in plenary sessions. Students are expected to use feedback constructively and thus gradually commit to a final version of their research project. PLEASE NOTE THAT IN THIS COURSE, THERE IS ONLY A LIMITED NUMBER OF PLACES FOR BA / MA CANDIDATES! HENCE, IT IS IMPERATIVE FOR PARTICIPANTS TO LIAISE WITH THE LECTURER PRIOR TO REGISTRATION! This course is designed for students preparing to write their final thesis (BA or MA) in the field of Didactics. Looking for suitable and, above all, viable topics, presenting first ideas and subsequently coming up with a plan on how to carry out your actual research will be at the centre of the preparatory process. Candidates will be required to submit and present different types of documents, e.g. literature overview, research proposal, abstract, etc. You will be working independently outside class, preparing findings to peers and supervisors on a regular basis. Standards of academic research and writing will be discussed in plenary sessions. Students are expected to use feedback constructively and thus gradually commit to a final version of their research project.
Colloquium 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.078 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
3.02.503 Ü Vorbereitung auf das Fachpraktikum Englisch (Gym) Tuesday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
CLASS ON CAMPUS! Having successfully mastered your initial pedagogical internship (“Allgemeines Schulpraktikum”), the next step is a subject-specific programme for future teachers of English. You will focus on the necessities of the syllabus but also on recognised standards, e.g. the Common European Framework and educational standards established across Germany (“Bildungsstandards”). The course is designed to help you make the transition from your university-based view on teaching to actually mastering the complex role of a classroom practitioner. Since your internship is likely to take place in Lower Saxony, the most recent version of the Core Curriculum (2016) will be explored and applied to the planning process of units of work and individual lessons. Participants are expected to critically analyse and develop complex tasks but also come up with short exercises and practice sessions as a means to foster language learning. Different teaching resources and textbooks will be studied against the backdrop of scientific insights into the subject. Lesson planning and creating units of work will be an integral part of the preparation for the upcoming field experience. A critical reflection of English lessons observed and taught during the initial pedagogical internship will serve as a basis for reflective lesson planning. A hands-on approach to developing key professional skills therefore involves • preparing and planning lessons and units of work, • realistic target setting • administrative skills such as reporting and recording, • assessment / testing and • planning for differentiation. By the end of the course you should be familiar with key requirements of lesson planning and teaching as well as the underlying principles of language learning. CLASS ON CAMPUS! Having successfully mastered your initial pedagogical internship (“Allgemeines Schulpraktikum”), the next step is a subject-specific programme for future teachers of English. You will focus on the necessities of the syllabus but also on recognised standards, e.g. the Common European Framework and educational standards established across Germany (“Bildungsstandards”). The course is designed to help you make the transition from your university-based view on teaching to actually mastering the complex role of a classroom practitioner. Since your internship is likely to take place in Lower Saxony, the most recent version of the Core Curriculum (2016) will be explored and applied to the planning process of units of work and individual lessons. Participants are expected to critically analyse and develop complex tasks but also come up with short exercises and practice sessions as a means to foster language learning. Different teaching resources and textbooks will be studied against the backdrop of scientific insights into the subject. Lesson planning and creating units of work will be an integral part of the preparation for the upcoming field experience. A critical reflection of English lessons observed and taught during the initial pedagogical internship will serve as a basis for reflective lesson planning. A hands-on approach to developing key professional skills therefore involves • preparing and planning lessons and units of work, • realistic target setting • administrative skills such as reporting and recording, • assessment / testing and • planning for differentiation. By the end of the course you should be familiar with key requirements of lesson planning and teaching as well as the underlying principles of language learning.
Exercises 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.201 S Multiculturalism and Literature Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)

Description:
The seminar provides an overview of postcolonial storytelling and the concept of multiculturalism followed by an analysis of a variety of literary products ranging from the early 80s to the present. Questions of national identity will be covered as well as cultural, political and religious issues. London as a hub of the British multicultural experience will be explored in greater detail. Excerpts from selected texts comprise works by e.g. - Hanif Kureishi, The Buddha of Suburbia, 1990 - Hanif Kureishi, The Black Album, 1995 - Arundhati Roy, The God of the Small Things, 1997 - Zadie Smith, White Teeth, 2000 - Monica Ali, Brick Lane, 2000 - Rose Tremain, The Road Home, 2007 - Amanda Craig, Hearts and Minds, 2009 - John Lanchester, Capital, 2013 Each text will be analysed and assessed with regard to its suitability for classroom use. Excerpts from textbook units along with the accompanying tasks and media will be critically examined. Additional material from a variety of sources will be collected, presented and prepared for classroom use. Task design will be practiced by providing motivating challenges for young adult readers and learners of English. Recent discussions on Britains colonial past and the "black-lives-matter" discussion will also be taken into account. Relevant reading in this field comprises: -Akala, Natives. Race & Class in the Ruins of the Empire (2018) -Eddo-Lodge, R. Why I`m No Longer Talking to White People About Race (2018) -Hirsch, A., British. On Race, IIdentitty and Belonging (2018) -Shukla, N. (Ed.) The Good Immigrant (2016) - On successful completion of this module, students should - be familiar with the British Empire and the literature emerging from the post-colonial experience -know about London`s significance for contemporary multicultural life -be able to explain the role of English in post-colonial storytelling -be able to analyse narrative texts reflecting the multicultural experience -be familiar with the content and interpretation of the texts dealt with in class -be able to assess the viability of select texts for classroom use -be aware of the rules and regulations the Core Curriculum in Lower Saxony stipulates for the topic -be able to critically assess literary products for teaching purposes and, if necessary, modify and edit them - provide tasks accompanying literary texts reflecting the multicultural experience Participants are expected to: - provide commentaries on topics discussed in class. -submit samples of work -pass a test at the end of term. The seminar provides an overview of postcolonial storytelling and the concept of multiculturalism followed by an analysis of a variety of literary products ranging from the early 80s to the present. Questions of national identity will be covered as well as cultural, political and religious issues. London as a hub of the British multicultural experience will be explored in greater detail. Excerpts from selected texts comprise works by e.g. - Hanif Kureishi, The Buddha of Suburbia, 1990 - Hanif Kureishi, The Black Album, 1995 - Arundhati Roy, The God of the Small Things, 1997 - Zadie Smith, White Teeth, 2000 - Monica Ali, Brick Lane, 2000 - Rose Tremain, The Road Home, 2007 - Amanda Craig, Hearts and Minds, 2009 - John Lanchester, Capital, 2013 Each text will be analysed and assessed with regard to its suitability for classroom use. Excerpts from textbook units along with the accompanying tasks and media will be critically examined. Additional material from a variety of sources will be collected, presented and prepared for classroom use. Task design will be practiced by providing motivating challenges for young adult readers and learners of English. Recent discussions on Britains colonial past and the "black-lives-matter" discussion will also be taken into account. Relevant reading in this field comprises: -Akala, Natives. Race & Class in the Ruins of the Empire (2018) -Eddo-Lodge, R. Why I`m No Longer Talking to White People About Race (2018) -Hirsch, A., British. On Race, IIdentitty and Belonging (2018) -Shukla, N. (Ed.) The Good Immigrant (2016) - On successful completion of this module, students should - be familiar with the British Empire and the literature emerging from the post-colonial experience -know about London`s significance for contemporary multicultural life -be able to explain the role of English in post-colonial storytelling -be able to analyse narrative texts reflecting the multicultural experience -be familiar with the content and interpretation of the texts dealt with in class -be able to assess the viability of select texts for classroom use -be aware of the rules and regulations the Core Curriculum in Lower Saxony stipulates for the topic -be able to critically assess literary products for teaching purposes and, if necessary, modify and edit them - provide tasks accompanying literary texts reflecting the multicultural experience Participants are expected to: - provide commentaries on topics discussed in class. -submit samples of work -pass a test at the end of term.
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.402 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Working with Grammar and Vocabulary Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Please note that this MM Übung will take place entirely online. Please note that this MM Übung will take place entirely online.
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.400 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Media in the Classroom Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
Please note that this MM Übung will take place entirely online. Please note that this MM Übung will take place entirely online.
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.075 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
3.02.044 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
3.02.308 KO Anglistisches-Amerikanistisches Forschungskolloquium Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, fortnightly (from 28/10/21)

Description:
Colloquium 1 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Master
3.02.061 TUT Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Wednesday: 18:00 - 19:00, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
Tutorial 1 Tabea Hirsch
  • Bachelor
3.02.001 V Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
Lecture 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
Christian Kramer, M.A.
Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.079 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 John-Martin Winter
  • Bachelor
3.02.100 Ü Spoken English: Food, glorious food Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Please note this Spoken English course will take place entirely online. Please note this Spoken English course will take place entirely online.
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.025 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Thursday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
20.01.311 Englisch Basismodul 1 Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)
Wednesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
Language course 4 Tim Dittmann
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.482 S Teaching Literature in the EFL Classroom Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
Teaching literature in the EFL Classroom Amongst the current generation of teaching professionals, the question whether literature – both with a capital and a small `l´- should be used in the EFL classroom is usually answered with a resounding “yes!”. For years critics of the competence-based approach have been calling for literature to be re-established as a means of fostering an education that goes beyond a mere acquisition of a certain skill set. In our digital age the number of literary texts available online as well as the products emerging from the communication between readers, texts and authors open up new types of literary discourse and expression transcending age, nationality and educational background. On the other hand, future teachers of English are bound to come across restrictions regarding their choice of literary works as well as the topics connected to them. German Abitur exams in particular require close scrutiny of the curriculum. Set texts and a variety of linguistic and analytical skills will be required to meet the assessment standards stipulated by the Ministry of Education. From primary school through to the final years of secondary school and Abitur-level both extensive reading of literary texts as well as reading with a view of composing a piece of writing are expected to be fostered systematically. The seminar aims at providing an overview of different literary texts, approaches and methods viable in the EFL classroom. Starting with visualisation techniques, story telling, scenic interpretation and creative writing participants are expected to get actively involved in classes by creating their own literary products and exchanging ideas about the viability of different didactic approaches. Other than that, everyone will be required to provide short keynote presentations on a selection of topics connected to teaching literature. You can put your name down for topics from the second week of term. Against the backdrop of current research in Didactics, participants are expected to analyse teaching and learning materials as well as (excerpts from) current textbooks for various age groups. Different approaches towards teaching literature will be explored. The development of units of work and lesson plans will be informed by relevant theories of language learning and teaching and can be critically applied to a selection of tasks, resources and ideas for projects connected to teaching literature. Lesson planning and the analysis of lessons involves • realistic target setting, • allowing for differentiation, • an appropriate choice of materials and media • as well as devising appropriate assessment strategies. Schemes of work submitted by students will be put under close scrutiny by peers and the lecturer in order to determine their viability in the classroom. Ideally, concepts and strategies will be put into practice during subsequent internships. As regards the submission of coursework as part of your final assessment, all participants are required to hand in a portfolio showing their ability to plan and reflect on lessons and schemes of work or tasks. Teaching literature in the EFL Classroom Amongst the current generation of teaching professionals, the question whether literature – both with a capital and a small `l´- should be used in the EFL classroom is usually answered with a resounding “yes!”. For years critics of the competence-based approach have been calling for literature to be re-established as a means of fostering an education that goes beyond a mere acquisition of a certain skill set. In our digital age the number of literary texts available online as well as the products emerging from the communication between readers, texts and authors open up new types of literary discourse and expression transcending age, nationality and educational background. On the other hand, future teachers of English are bound to come across restrictions regarding their choice of literary works as well as the topics connected to them. German Abitur exams in particular require close scrutiny of the curriculum. Set texts and a variety of linguistic and analytical skills will be required to meet the assessment standards stipulated by the Ministry of Education. From primary school through to the final years of secondary school and Abitur-level both extensive reading of literary texts as well as reading with a view of composing a piece of writing are expected to be fostered systematically. The seminar aims at providing an overview of different literary texts, approaches and methods viable in the EFL classroom. Starting with visualisation techniques, story telling, scenic interpretation and creative writing participants are expected to get actively involved in classes by creating their own literary products and exchanging ideas about the viability of different didactic approaches. Other than that, everyone will be required to provide short keynote presentations on a selection of topics connected to teaching literature. You can put your name down for topics from the second week of term. Against the backdrop of current research in Didactics, participants are expected to analyse teaching and learning materials as well as (excerpts from) current textbooks for various age groups. Different approaches towards teaching literature will be explored. The development of units of work and lesson plans will be informed by relevant theories of language learning and teaching and can be critically applied to a selection of tasks, resources and ideas for projects connected to teaching literature. Lesson planning and the analysis of lessons involves • realistic target setting, • allowing for differentiation, • an appropriate choice of materials and media • as well as devising appropriate assessment strategies. Schemes of work submitted by students will be put under close scrutiny by peers and the lecturer in order to determine their viability in the classroom. Ideally, concepts and strategies will be put into practice during subsequent internships. As regards the submission of coursework as part of your final assessment, all participants are required to hand in a portfolio showing their ability to plan and reflect on lessons and schemes of work or tasks.
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.102 Ü Spoken English: Germany Through an Anglophone Lens Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.056 TUT Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 18:00 - 19:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Tutorial 1 Lea Christina Behrens
  • Bachelor
20.01.314 English for University Studies 4 - Language Functions A Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)
Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
Language course 4 Eric Ahlberg, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.110 Ü Written English: College Commencement Speeches Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.041 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Bachelor
3.02.970 S Reparative Readings: Cultivating Resilience, Mindfulness, and Healing in Contemporary Fiction Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)

Description:
We are, all of us, trained to be – what Eve Sedgwick has called – %%paranoid%% readers, lingering on in a state of permanent alertness in order to anticipate the workings of regulatory regimes; seeking to see through the constructions of normative culture; sounding out the political and ideological effects of representation. Undeniably then, this paranoid approach to the text has characterised cultural studies at least since the pioneering publications of Michel Foucault, Judith Butler and their likes – and rightly so, as a critical attitude towards cultural texts is, of course, mandatory and indeed indispensable. However, does it have to be the %%only%% intelligible approach to cultural texts? In the face of an ongoing impoverishment of affective responses to culture, Sedgwick therefore aspires to reclaim a reading practice that addresses a completely different set of affects, namely those linked to the personal rather than the political and, therefore, to values such as resilience, mindfulness, recovery, healing, or uplift: %%reparative%% readings. Complementing rather than replacing the usual paranoid approaches, reparative reading practices are thus no less attached to the projects of growth and survival than paranoid reading practices; what is more, they may in fact balance out and smooth the straining effects of the latter. Focusing on works that represent affective responses to difficult feelings and emotions like anxiety, fear, loss or grief, this seminar investigates how textual and cultural analysis can benefit from the coexistence of %%paranoid%% and %%reparative%% readings, claiming that both are vital and indeed mutually reinforcing. Please read/watch: Mars-Jones, Adam. %%Monopolies of Loss%%. London: Faber and Faber, 1992. Print. [selected short stories] Edson, Margaret. %%W;t%%. 1993. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1999. Print. Bechdel, Alison. %%Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic%%. London: Jonathan Cape, 2006. Print. ---. %%Are You My Mother: A Comic Drama%%. Boston and New York: Mariner, 2012. Print. %%Breakfast on Pluto%%. Dir. Neil Jordan. Perf. Cillian Murphy, Ruth Negga, Liam Neeson, Stephen Rea, and Brendan Gleeson. 2005. Sony Pictures Home Entertainment, 2006. DVD. [or, alternatively: McCabe, Patrick. %%Breakfast on Pluto%%. London: Picador, 1998. Print. (or any other edition)] %%CitizenFour%%. Dir. Laura Poitras. Perf. Edward Snowdon, Glenn Greenwald, Laura Poitras. 2014. Good Movies/Indigo, 2015. DVD. We are, all of us, trained to be – what Eve Sedgwick has called – %%paranoid%% readers, lingering on in a state of permanent alertness in order to anticipate the workings of regulatory regimes; seeking to see through the constructions of normative culture; sounding out the political and ideological effects of representation. Undeniably then, this paranoid approach to the text has characterised cultural studies at least since the pioneering publications of Michel Foucault, Judith Butler and their likes – and rightly so, as a critical attitude towards cultural texts is, of course, mandatory and indeed indispensable. However, does it have to be the %%only%% intelligible approach to cultural texts? In the face of an ongoing impoverishment of affective responses to culture, Sedgwick therefore aspires to reclaim a reading practice that addresses a completely different set of affects, namely those linked to the personal rather than the political and, therefore, to values such as resilience, mindfulness, recovery, healing, or uplift: %%reparative%% readings. Complementing rather than replacing the usual paranoid approaches, reparative reading practices are thus no less attached to the projects of growth and survival than paranoid reading practices; what is more, they may in fact balance out and smooth the straining effects of the latter. Focusing on works that represent affective responses to difficult feelings and emotions like anxiety, fear, loss or grief, this seminar investigates how textual and cultural analysis can benefit from the coexistence of %%paranoid%% and %%reparative%% readings, claiming that both are vital and indeed mutually reinforcing. Please read/watch: Mars-Jones, Adam. %%Monopolies of Loss%%. London: Faber and Faber, 1992. Print. [selected short stories] Edson, Margaret. %%W;t%%. 1993. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1999. Print. Bechdel, Alison. %%Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic%%. London: Jonathan Cape, 2006. Print. ---. %%Are You My Mother: A Comic Drama%%. Boston and New York: Mariner, 2012. Print. %%Breakfast on Pluto%%. Dir. Neil Jordan. Perf. Cillian Murphy, Ruth Negga, Liam Neeson, Stephen Rea, and Brendan Gleeson. 2005. Sony Pictures Home Entertainment, 2006. DVD. [or, alternatively: McCabe, Patrick. %%Breakfast on Pluto%%. London: Picador, 1998. Print. (or any other edition)] %%CitizenFour%%. Dir. Laura Poitras. Perf. Edward Snowdon, Glenn Greenwald, Laura Poitras. 2014. Good Movies/Indigo, 2015. DVD.
Seminar 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.160 S Motion Events and Language Education Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)

Description:
Seminar 2 Katharina Zaychenko
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.029 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Thursday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lina Abed Ibrahim, M.A.
  • Bachelor
3.02.026 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Wednesday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Nils Rademacher
  • Bachelor
3.02.073 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.059 TUT Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Monday: 18:00 - 19:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)

Description:
Tutorial 1 Matthias Himstedt
  • Bachelor
3.02.410 Ü Academic Discourse: Practical Translation Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Master of Education
  • Master
20.01.319 English for University Studies 5 - Comprehensive Language Practice Thursday: 08:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Language course 4 Richard Dawton
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.003 Review: Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
This voluntary revision course is designed to provide a systematic review of content the lecture ang 049 covers. By focusing on skills participants are expected to have aquired prior to the end-of-term testpaper, our sessions are designed to provide hands-on revision tasks and the opportunity to explore and discuss issues in EFL teaching from different angles. Your personal views and experiences will also be taken into account in order to create a comprehensive picture of your future role and skillset as EFL classroom practitioner. Teaching methods comprise -exercises and tasks, -group assignments, -short presentations among your peers. Learning materials will be provided. Intended Learning Outcomes: By the end of term, participants are expected to -be familiar with the content of lecture ang 049. -be able to tackle tasks applying the knowledge gained. -reflect on their own role as future EFL practitioner. Formative assessment methods due to voluntary basis of participation: -self & peer assessment -opportunity for individual coaching and tutoring at the end of each session Please note that the language used in this course is English! If the need arises, however, I am happy to discuss aspects in German, too. This voluntary revision course is designed to provide a systematic review of content the lecture ang 049 covers. By focusing on skills participants are expected to have aquired prior to the end-of-term testpaper, our sessions are designed to provide hands-on revision tasks and the opportunity to explore and discuss issues in EFL teaching from different angles. Your personal views and experiences will also be taken into account in order to create a comprehensive picture of your future role and skillset as EFL classroom practitioner. Teaching methods comprise -exercises and tasks, -group assignments, -short presentations among your peers. Learning materials will be provided. Intended Learning Outcomes: By the end of term, participants are expected to -be familiar with the content of lecture ang 049. -be able to tackle tasks applying the knowledge gained. -reflect on their own role as future EFL practitioner. Formative assessment methods due to voluntary basis of participation: -self & peer assessment -opportunity for individual coaching and tutoring at the end of each session Please note that the language used in this course is English! If the need arises, however, I am happy to discuss aspects in German, too.
Exercises 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
3.02.200 S Media Literacy in ELT Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Birte Sause
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.141 S Representations of Shark Science/Scientists in Anglophone Literature and Culture Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 08/11/21)

Description:
"Apparently, a great white shark has staked a claim to the waters off Amity Island. And he's going to feed here as long as there is food in the water. [...] A shark is attracted to the exact kind of splashing and activity that occurs whenever human beings go swimming. [...] What we are dealing with here is a perfect engine, an eating machine. It's really a miracle of evolution. All this machine does is swim and eat ... and make little sharks." This is how marine biologist Matt Hooper describes great white sharks in Steven Spielberg's blockbuster Jaws (1975). Arguably, Hooper thus simultaneously drew on long-established ideas about sharks but also reconfigured this machinistic image as a scientifically accepted "fact." At the same time, Hooper represents a textbook example of a scientist: intelligent, idealistic to the point of seemingly spending more money on his science than earning from it, white, and male. In addition to reading actual shark science, we will discuss a selection of representations of shark scientists in fiction and nonfiction, from what could be labeled "the original shark documentary," Blue Water, White Death (1971) and both the Jaws novel (1974) and film to postcolonial examples such as Kojo Laing's Big Bishop Roko and the Altar Gangsters (2006) to trashy rollercoaster rides such as Steve Alten's Meg (1997), and reality television shows such as Shark Wranglers (2012). Of course, we cannot disentangle the representation of shark scientists from their Other, sharks, which is why we will also explore sharks as material bodies and representations in this undergraduate seminar. This seminar will be online. There will be a few weeks of input via video presentations (and quizzes based on the video presentations) at the start of the semester before we will get together to discuss the novels, films, etc. You may participate either synchronously or asynchronously (you may also switch on a weekly basis). Groups for synchronous participation will meet on Mondays, 2pm, and Fridays, 9am. You may join either group. These weekly meetings won't start before November. You will need to collect 50 (of 100) points during the term to have "participated actively," which you need to qualify for the "Prüfungsleistung." "Apparently, a great white shark has staked a claim to the waters off Amity Island. And he's going to feed here as long as there is food in the water. [...] A shark is attracted to the exact kind of splashing and activity that occurs whenever human beings go swimming. [...] What we are dealing with here is a perfect engine, an eating machine. It's really a miracle of evolution. All this machine does is swim and eat ... and make little sharks." This is how marine biologist Matt Hooper describes great white sharks in Steven Spielberg's blockbuster Jaws (1975). Arguably, Hooper thus simultaneously drew on long-established ideas about sharks but also reconfigured this machinistic image as a scientifically accepted "fact." At the same time, Hooper represents a textbook example of a scientist: intelligent, idealistic to the point of seemingly spending more money on his science than earning from it, white, and male. In addition to reading actual shark science, we will discuss a selection of representations of shark scientists in fiction and nonfiction, from what could be labeled "the original shark documentary," Blue Water, White Death (1971) and both the Jaws novel (1974) and film to postcolonial examples such as Kojo Laing's Big Bishop Roko and the Altar Gangsters (2006) to trashy rollercoaster rides such as Steve Alten's Meg (1997), and reality television shows such as Shark Wranglers (2012). Of course, we cannot disentangle the representation of shark scientists from their Other, sharks, which is why we will also explore sharks as material bodies and representations in this undergraduate seminar. This seminar will be online. There will be a few weeks of input via video presentations (and quizzes based on the video presentations) at the start of the semester before we will get together to discuss the novels, films, etc. You may participate either synchronously or asynchronously (you may also switch on a weekly basis). Groups for synchronous participation will meet on Mondays, 2pm, and Fridays, 9am. You may join either group. These weekly meetings won't start before November. You will need to collect 50 (of 100) points during the term to have "participated actively," which you need to qualify for the "Prüfungsleistung."
Seminar 2 Dr. Michael Fuchs
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
20.01.318 English for University Studies 4 - Writing and Speaking Wednesday: 08:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
Language course 4 Wenny Susanto-Berky
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.057 TUT Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Tuesday: 18:00 - 19:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
Tutorial 1 Lea Christina Behrens
  • Bachelor
3.02.042 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 22/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.02.006 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Malte Björn Peick
  • Bachelor
3.02.004 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Sarah Kaltofen
  • Bachelor
3.02.033 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Tutorial - Sarah Kaltofen
  • Bachelor
3.02.480 S Current Issues in ELT Monday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Master of Education
3.02.504 Ü Vorbereitung auf das Forschungs- und Entwicklungspraktikum Fach Englisch (FEP) Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 1 Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Master of Education
3.02.051 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature (Käpernick) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Exercises - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.114 Ü Written English: Environment Thursday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dana Strakova
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.301 KO Abschlusskolloquium: BA, MEd, Projektband GHR 300, DoktorandInnen Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.050 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Alena Cicholewski
  • Bachelor
3.02.502 Ü Vorbereitung auf das Fachpraktikum Englisch (Gym) Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
ONLINE COURSE Having successfully mastered your initial pedagogical internship (“Allgemeines Schulpraktikum”), the next step is a subject-specific programme for future teachers of English. You will focus on the necessities of the syllabus but also on recognised standards, e.g. the Common European Framework and educational standards established across Germany (“Bildungsstandards”). The course is designed to help you make the transition from your university-based view on teaching to actually mastering the complex role of a classroom practitioner. Since your internship is likely to take place in Lower Saxony, the most recent version of the Core Curriculum (2016) will be explored and applied to the planning process of units of work and individual lessons. Participants are expected to critically analyse and develop complex tasks but also come up with short exercises and practice sessions as a means to foster language learning. Different teaching resources and textbooks will be studied against the backdrop of scientific insights into the subject. Lesson planning and creating units of work will be an integral part of the preparation for the upcoming field experience. A critical reflection of English lessons observed and taught during the initial pedagogical internship will serve as a basis for reflective lesson planning. A hands-on approach to developing key professional skills therefore involves • preparing and planning lessons and units of work, • realistic target setting • administrative skills such as reporting and recording, • assessment / testing and • planning for differentiation. By the end of the course you should be familiar with key requirements of lesson planning and teaching as well as the underlying principles of language learning. ONLINE COURSE Having successfully mastered your initial pedagogical internship (“Allgemeines Schulpraktikum”), the next step is a subject-specific programme for future teachers of English. You will focus on the necessities of the syllabus but also on recognised standards, e.g. the Common European Framework and educational standards established across Germany (“Bildungsstandards”). The course is designed to help you make the transition from your university-based view on teaching to actually mastering the complex role of a classroom practitioner. Since your internship is likely to take place in Lower Saxony, the most recent version of the Core Curriculum (2016) will be explored and applied to the planning process of units of work and individual lessons. Participants are expected to critically analyse and develop complex tasks but also come up with short exercises and practice sessions as a means to foster language learning. Different teaching resources and textbooks will be studied against the backdrop of scientific insights into the subject. Lesson planning and creating units of work will be an integral part of the preparation for the upcoming field experience. A critical reflection of English lessons observed and taught during the initial pedagogical internship will serve as a basis for reflective lesson planning. A hands-on approach to developing key professional skills therefore involves • preparing and planning lessons and units of work, • realistic target setting • administrative skills such as reporting and recording, • assessment / testing and • planning for differentiation. By the end of the course you should be familiar with key requirements of lesson planning and teaching as well as the underlying principles of language learning.
Exercises 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
20.01.316 English for University Studies 4 - Listening and Speaking Thursday: 08:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Language course 4 Wenny Susanto-Berky
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.170 S English as a Global Language Wednesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
The central topic of this seminar is to investigate language change. We will discuss roughly 1500 years focussing on periods that have conventionally been classified as "turning-points" in the linguistic history of the English language. Our inquiry will encompass processes of language internal change as well as the external influence as a result of language contact. The seminar itself will be presented as a downloadable podcast plus ppt-presentation, meaning that there is no weekly live session. However, we will meet a few times to clarify organizational matters and/or any questions that come up. The central topic of this seminar is to investigate language change. We will discuss roughly 1500 years focussing on periods that have conventionally been classified as "turning-points" in the linguistic history of the English language. Our inquiry will encompass processes of language internal change as well as the external influence as a result of language contact. The seminar itself will be presented as a downloadable podcast plus ppt-presentation, meaning that there is no weekly live session. However, we will meet a few times to clarify organizational matters and/or any questions that come up.
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.002 Review: Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Bachelor
3.02.220 S Screening Europe: Representations of Europe in US-American Film, TV, and Poetry Thursday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
“I may not know much but I do know that Europeans love Americans.” This is what Peter Parker’s sidekick Ned tells him as they set off on their school trip to Europe in the new "Spider-Man: Far from Home" movie (2019). This is just one example of a common trope in US-American film: the trip to Europe. Some US-American TV series also dedicate special “vacation episodes” to certain cities in Europe (e.g. "Friends," "Parks and Recreation," or "How I Met Your Mother"). In each of these cases, a certain notion of Europe, European cities, and Europeans is constructed. These notions often times include stereotypes, myths, and romantic ideas, e.g., sexual freedom, cheap alcohol, and old castles. No matter how different the films and TV series are, each of these representations reproduces but also constructs an idea of Europe, certain parts of Europe, and the people who live there. In the seminar, we will have a look at different representations of Europe in film and TV. With a representation-critical approach and the methodological toolkit of film analysis, global perspectives of Europe or parts of Europe and what it means to be European will be examined and analyzed. Guiding questions will be inter alia: - How is Europe represented? - Which filmic devices are employed to construct or support a certain notion of Europe? - What is represented/suggested/identified as (stereo)typical European? - Which voices are heard, which are not? What is made visible and what remains invisible? The course is primarily geared towards international exchange students participating in the "European Studies in Global Perspectives" program, but it is also open to University of Oldenburg students. “I may not know much but I do know that Europeans love Americans.” This is what Peter Parker’s sidekick Ned tells him as they set off on their school trip to Europe in the new "Spider-Man: Far from Home" movie (2019). This is just one example of a common trope in US-American film: the trip to Europe. Some US-American TV series also dedicate special “vacation episodes” to certain cities in Europe (e.g. "Friends," "Parks and Recreation," or "How I Met Your Mother"). In each of these cases, a certain notion of Europe, European cities, and Europeans is constructed. These notions often times include stereotypes, myths, and romantic ideas, e.g., sexual freedom, cheap alcohol, and old castles. No matter how different the films and TV series are, each of these representations reproduces but also constructs an idea of Europe, certain parts of Europe, and the people who live there. In the seminar, we will have a look at different representations of Europe in film and TV. With a representation-critical approach and the methodological toolkit of film analysis, global perspectives of Europe or parts of Europe and what it means to be European will be examined and analyzed. Guiding questions will be inter alia: - How is Europe represented? - Which filmic devices are employed to construct or support a certain notion of Europe? - What is represented/suggested/identified as (stereo)typical European? - Which voices are heard, which are not? What is made visible and what remains invisible? The course is primarily geared towards international exchange students participating in the "European Studies in Global Perspectives" program, but it is also open to University of Oldenburg students.
Seminar 2 Michal Musialowski
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.313 DS Directed Studies The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
miscellaneous - Dr. Galena Hashhozheva
  • Bachelor
3.02.130 S Wetlands: Coastal Gothic and New Folk Horror in English Literature Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
The sublime English wetlands, arguably most strikingly brought to mind by the Cornish coast, the North York Moors, and the Fens of East Anglia, traditionally represent liminal spaces where the boundaries between the land and the sea, the earth and the sky are unstable, impermanent, and constantly blurred. Construed in often bleak and uncanny ways that emphasise the liminal notion of the in-between, these landscapes have for a long time served as the settings for traditional horror genres, such as the ghost story or gothic literature more generally. These time-honoured literary and cultural constructions have been revived recently through the emergence of a number of postmodern genres - coastal gothic, new folk horror, or the English eerie – that continue traditional genre conventions, even as they parody, question and re-write them. In this seminar, then, our aim is to analyse literary representations of the English wetlands as we follow them chronologically through a number of different materials, from M.R. James's ghost stories to more recent texts by Daisy Johnson (%%Fen%%), Wyl Menmuir (%%The Many%%), Andrew Michael Hurley (%%The Loney%%), and Robert Macfarlane (%%Ness%%). Please buy and read; James, M.R. %%Collected Ghost Stories%%. 1931. Oxford: OUP, 2013. Print. [selected short stories] Johnson, Daisy. %%Fen%%. London: Vintage, 2016. Print. [selected short stories] Menmuir, Wyl. %%The Many%%. Cromer: Salt, 2016. Print. Hurley, Andrew Michael. %%The Loney%%. London: John Murray, 2014. Print. Macfarlane, Robert and Stanley Donwood. %%Ness%%. London: Hamish Hamilton, 2018. Print. The sublime English wetlands, arguably most strikingly brought to mind by the Cornish coast, the North York Moors, and the Fens of East Anglia, traditionally represent liminal spaces where the boundaries between the land and the sea, the earth and the sky are unstable, impermanent, and constantly blurred. Construed in often bleak and uncanny ways that emphasise the liminal notion of the in-between, these landscapes have for a long time served as the settings for traditional horror genres, such as the ghost story or gothic literature more generally. These time-honoured literary and cultural constructions have been revived recently through the emergence of a number of postmodern genres - coastal gothic, new folk horror, or the English eerie – that continue traditional genre conventions, even as they parody, question and re-write them. In this seminar, then, our aim is to analyse literary representations of the English wetlands as we follow them chronologically through a number of different materials, from M.R. James's ghost stories to more recent texts by Daisy Johnson (%%Fen%%), Wyl Menmuir (%%The Many%%), Andrew Michael Hurley (%%The Loney%%), and Robert Macfarlane (%%Ness%%). Please buy and read; James, M.R. %%Collected Ghost Stories%%. 1931. Oxford: OUP, 2013. Print. [selected short stories] Johnson, Daisy. %%Fen%%. London: Vintage, 2016. Print. [selected short stories] Menmuir, Wyl. %%The Many%%. Cromer: Salt, 2016. Print. Hurley, Andrew Michael. %%The Loney%%. London: John Murray, 2014. Print. Macfarlane, Robert and Stanley Donwood. %%Ness%%. London: Hamish Hamilton, 2018. Print.
Seminar 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
20.01.324 Wirtschaftsenglisch 2 Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)
Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Language course 4 Tim Dittmann
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.045 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
3.02.111 Ü Written English Friday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 22/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.027 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Wednesday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Nils Rademacher
  • Bachelor
3.02.055 Ü Repetitorium: Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 22/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.02.971 S Humanoid Machines in Anglophone Fiction Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Master of Education
  • Master
20.01.313 English for University Studies 3 - Comprehensive Language Skills B Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)
Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Language course 4 Tim Dittmann
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.510 Ü Betreuung des Fachpraktikums Englisch vor Ort (Gym) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
This course aims at widening your planning and teaching skills as a reflective practitioner. In a school environment you are going to put your knowledge and previous teaching expertise to the test by checking its viability in a real-life classroom. Please invite me for teaching observations at the earliest opportunity. For a supervised lesson observation you will be required to submit a lesson plan and be prepared to discuss lesson outcomes afterwards. The aim is to make the most of your field experience. This course aims at widening your planning and teaching skills as a reflective practitioner. In a school environment you are going to put your knowledge and previous teaching expertise to the test by checking its viability in a real-life classroom. Please invite me for teaching observations at the earliest opportunity. For a supervised lesson observation you will be required to submit a lesson plan and be prepared to discuss lesson outcomes afterwards. The aim is to make the most of your field experience.
Exercises - Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.305 KO New Research in American Literary and Cultural Studies Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
This course is open to all students who are preparing to write - or who are already in the process of writing - their BA and MA theses in American literary and cultural studies, as well as to students who want to do a research module ("Recherchemodul"). Students will hone their academic writings skills with the help of various exercises and written assignments, develop an exposé, and share and revise their work in progress. The course also offers the opportunity to discuss theoretical texts central to the research projects of the participants. Requirements: Regular attendance to the scheduled online sessions; completion of all writing assignments; development of an exposé; active participation in class discussions. This course is open to all students who are preparing to write - or who are already in the process of writing - their BA and MA theses in American literary and cultural studies, as well as to students who want to do a research module ("Recherchemodul"). Students will hone their academic writings skills with the help of various exercises and written assignments, develop an exposé, and share and revise their work in progress. The course also offers the opportunity to discuss theoretical texts central to the research projects of the participants. Requirements: Regular attendance to the scheduled online sessions; completion of all writing assignments; development of an exposé; active participation in class discussions.
Colloquium 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.404 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Teacher Talk in ELT Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.076 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
20.01.321 English Success at Work 5 - Application Skills Friday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 22/10/21)

Description:
The Success in Business Course is composed of 3 business courses (Application Skills; Communication Skills; Grammar and Vocabulary Skills). http://www.uni-oldenburg.de/fk3/sprachenzentrum/sprachen/englisch/kursangebot/success-in-business/ The Success in Business Course is composed of 3 business courses (Application Skills; Communication Skills; Grammar and Vocabulary Skills). http://www.uni-oldenburg.de/fk3/sprachenzentrum/sprachen/englisch/kursangebot/success-in-business/
Language course 2 Richard Dawton
  • Bachelor
3.02.047 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 22/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
3.02.105 Ü Spoken English: A Language of Visionaries Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 John-Martin Winter
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.021 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Tuesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.172 S Interlanguage Pragmatics: Studying EFL Learners' Pragmatic Competence Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
“Hwæt sceolan we drinkan?”, what looks like an odd mixture of English and German is actually correct English – just more or less 1300 years old. One can still rather easily recognize the interrogative pronoun “what” only that the “hw” is nowadays reversed. “Sceolan” is probably a little hard to decipher at first glance, however at least for German natives it should – especially in combination with the last word of the question – be quickly identifiable as the equivalent to Modern English “shall” (or sollen – in OE the “sc” was pronounced as “sh”). The fellow who phrased this particular question therefore spoke perfect (Old) English, and yet how come that it looks more like a heavy German dialect than proper English? This issue will be one of the leading questions for this seminar. Where did the English language come from? Why is it even called English? Where did the languages before English go? Was there something like an “Old English period”? To answer those (and other questions) a period of language history lasting around 800 years will be examined. The focus will thereby not only lay with understanding the basics of Old English spelling, phonology and surface structure, but also in identifying key concepts of language contact and language change and how they have left traces within the everyday language we use. “Hwæt sceolan we drinkan?”, what looks like an odd mixture of English and German is actually correct English – just more or less 1300 years old. One can still rather easily recognize the interrogative pronoun “what” only that the “hw” is nowadays reversed. “Sceolan” is probably a little hard to decipher at first glance, however at least for German natives it should – especially in combination with the last word of the question – be quickly identifiable as the equivalent to Modern English “shall” (or sollen – in OE the “sc” was pronounced as “sh”). The fellow who phrased this particular question therefore spoke perfect (Old) English, and yet how come that it looks more like a heavy German dialect than proper English? This issue will be one of the leading questions for this seminar. Where did the English language come from? Why is it even called English? Where did the languages before English go? Was there something like an “Old English period”? To answer those (and other questions) a period of language history lasting around 800 years will be examined. The focus will thereby not only lay with understanding the basics of Old English spelling, phonology and surface structure, but also in identifying key concepts of language contact and language change and how they have left traces within the everyday language we use.
Seminar 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.998 S Multiple Imaginations: Germany's Pasts and Presents The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
In this seminar, we will work on different narratives about and representations of what is imagined – in different times and under different (political, social, economic) circumstances – as ‘Germany’. We will explore what ‘Germany’ supposedly is and gain a deeper understanding of it. With a cultural studies perspective we will look at what and who is represented by whom as ‘German(y)’, who and what is excluded by the narratives, what the specific circumstances for specific narratives are, and which counter-narratives can be found. The aim of the seminar is not to study what is called ‘Germany’ or ‘Europe’ but to learn about representation and perspectives of (multiple) self-imaginations, how they are constructed in different narratives and which functions these imaginations serve. In the context of this seminar, we do a joint study trip to the Auswandererhaus in Bremerhaven to explore different narratives and representations about Germany’s past and present. With a selection of texts and short films we will examine issues of exclusion and inclusion, and their implications. In this seminar, we will work on different narratives about and representations of what is imagined – in different times and under different (political, social, economic) circumstances – as ‘Germany’. We will explore what ‘Germany’ supposedly is and gain a deeper understanding of it. With a cultural studies perspective we will look at what and who is represented by whom as ‘German(y)’, who and what is excluded by the narratives, what the specific circumstances for specific narratives are, and which counter-narratives can be found. The aim of the seminar is not to study what is called ‘Germany’ or ‘Europe’ but to learn about representation and perspectives of (multiple) self-imaginations, how they are constructed in different narratives and which functions these imaginations serve. In the context of this seminar, we do a joint study trip to the Auswandererhaus in Bremerhaven to explore different narratives and representations about Germany’s past and present. With a selection of texts and short films we will examine issues of exclusion and inclusion, and their implications.
Seminar - Michal Musialowski
Sunday Omwenyeke
3.02.023 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Wednesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.140 S "I Can't Breathe": African American Young Adult Fiction Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
This class focuses on African American young adult fiction written by African American authors. Sharing the common trope of the search for identity of young adult literature in general, young adult fiction for and about African American teens specifically illuminates questions of racial and ethnic diversity and hybridity within constructions of (national and black diasporic) identity. We will examine the identity constructions of young black male, female, and queer black protagonists offered by three award-winning young adult novels that also tackle a host of issues such as the criminalization of young black males, police violence, systemic racism, classism, disability, or mental illness. The study of different theoretical perspectives regarding race, representation, childhood/adolescence, and young adult literature will foster our critical analysis of the heterogeneous constructions of young adults of the reading materials as well as the interrogation of our own presumptions about what it means to be young and black in a globalized America today. Please note: This course takes place online and we won’t be meeting every week. You will find the schedule that marks online sessions and study weeks in the course syllabus that will be made available at the beginning of the semester. Please purchase and read the following primary texts: - Walter Dean Myers, Monster. 1999. New York: HarperCollins, 2019. Twentieth Anniversary Edition: https://www.harpercollins.com/products/monster-walter-dean-myers?variant=32117216149538. - Angie Thomas. The Hate U Give. 2017. London: Walker Books, 2018. https://www.walker.co.uk/The-Hate-U-Give-9781406372151.aspx. - Brandy Colbert. Little & Lyon. 2015. New York and Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 2018. https://www.littlebrown.co.uk/titles/brandy-colbert/little-lion/9780316349017/. This class focuses on African American young adult fiction written by African American authors. Sharing the common trope of the search for identity of young adult literature in general, young adult fiction for and about African American teens specifically illuminates questions of racial and ethnic diversity and hybridity within constructions of (national and black diasporic) identity. We will examine the identity constructions of young black male, female, and queer black protagonists offered by three award-winning young adult novels that also tackle a host of issues such as the criminalization of young black males, police violence, systemic racism, classism, disability, or mental illness. The study of different theoretical perspectives regarding race, representation, childhood/adolescence, and young adult literature will foster our critical analysis of the heterogeneous constructions of young adults of the reading materials as well as the interrogation of our own presumptions about what it means to be young and black in a globalized America today. Please note: This course takes place online and we won’t be meeting every week. You will find the schedule that marks online sessions and study weeks in the course syllabus that will be made available at the beginning of the semester. Please purchase and read the following primary texts: - Walter Dean Myers, Monster. 1999. New York: HarperCollins, 2019. Twentieth Anniversary Edition: https://www.harpercollins.com/products/monster-walter-dean-myers?variant=32117216149538. - Angie Thomas. The Hate U Give. 2017. London: Walker Books, 2018. https://www.walker.co.uk/The-Hate-U-Give-9781406372151.aspx. - Brandy Colbert. Little & Lyon. 2015. New York and Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 2018. https://www.littlebrown.co.uk/titles/brandy-colbert/little-lion/9780316349017/.
Seminar 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.046 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
3.02.931 S Lexical Semantics Thursday: 17:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Seminar 3 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.500 Ü Vorbereitung der Praxisphase GHR 300 im Unterrichtsfach Englisch Friday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 22/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 1 Elisabeth Lücken
Kerstin Weerts
Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Master of Education
20.01.312 English for University Studies 3 - Comprehensive Language Skills A Monday: 08:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)

Description:
Language course 4 Wenny Susanto-Berky
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.142 S Environmental Fiction Friday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 22/10/21)

Description:
Seminar - Dr. Galena Hashhozheva
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.112 Ü Written English Friday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 22/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.90.115 EMMIR Master Thesis "Navigating EMMIR" (MM41) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - Dr. Lydia Potts
Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
20.01.315 English for University Studies 4 - Language Functions B Tuesday: 08:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
Language course 4 Wenny Susanto-Berky
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.022 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Wednesday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.190 S Beginning Language Learners Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.032 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Thursday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Tutorial - Patrick Therkorn
  • Bachelor
3.02.104 Ü Spoken English: Higher Education in North America Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.074 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
3.02.950 S Speaking, Hearing, and Language Processing Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Marcel Schlechtweg
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.306 KO New Research in British and Anglophone Literary and Cultural Studies Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.191 S Dimensions of Diversity Monday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)

Description:
Starting out with a definition of diversity and the application of diversity education in different contexts, this class aims at exploring different manifestations of the term both at school and classroom level. Using the PISA results in 2001 as a starting point, national, European and multicultural values will be regarded against the backdrop of educational policies. A postcolonial perspective and the phenomenon of globalisation contribute to a more complex grasp the issues at hand. Looking at the situation in countries such as the UK or the US, home and school languages will be contrasted. A special focus on EAL (English as an additional language) and bilingual upbringing add to the topic of linguistic diversity. As a next step, language diversity in education will be examined as a broader term and then specified as “translanguaging across the bilingual continuum” (Ofelia García). Language policies as a political statement will be an important point of discussion and possibly contention. This will also include the idea (or ideology?) of the native speaker ideal, which will be deconstructed but also regarded as a powerful influence on TESOL discourse and teaching traditions. Finally, the concept of language-sensitive teaching and its impact on the TESOL classroom will be put under scrutiny. Participants are encouraged to contribute more examples of diversity to our discourse in class. Heteronormativity, e.g. as reflected in text books, could be a starting point for a critical discussion of the state of affairs in German schools. How can equality, diversity and inclusion actually be put into practice? What are practical tools for pluralistic approaches in TESOL classes? The idea of an inclusive classroom in Lower Saxony and its curricular manifestations will be amended by examples of other institutions, e.g. the British Council. In this context, different documents, concepts, resources and interviews with practitioners will be studied and critically reflected upon. One particular displacement story will serve as a starting point to ask how literary learning can contribute to a more diverse approach towards TESOL teaching. The course finishes by focusing on the question how differentiation can foster learning in the TESOL classroom. The concept of differentiation will be examined from a variety of angles and examples from teaching materials and textbooks serve as an opportunity to practise one`s analytical skills. Scaffolding is another important term participants need to be familiar with. Relevant references in the field will have to be studied in order to prepare for the final assessment. Assessment issues: Participants are expected to -contribute to discourse during class. -provide samples of their work. -pass an end-of-term test (written assessment / “E-Klausur”) Starting out with a definition of diversity and the application of diversity education in different contexts, this class aims at exploring different manifestations of the term both at school and classroom level. Using the PISA results in 2001 as a starting point, national, European and multicultural values will be regarded against the backdrop of educational policies. A postcolonial perspective and the phenomenon of globalisation contribute to a more complex grasp the issues at hand. Looking at the situation in countries such as the UK or the US, home and school languages will be contrasted. A special focus on EAL (English as an additional language) and bilingual upbringing add to the topic of linguistic diversity. As a next step, language diversity in education will be examined as a broader term and then specified as “translanguaging across the bilingual continuum” (Ofelia García). Language policies as a political statement will be an important point of discussion and possibly contention. This will also include the idea (or ideology?) of the native speaker ideal, which will be deconstructed but also regarded as a powerful influence on TESOL discourse and teaching traditions. Finally, the concept of language-sensitive teaching and its impact on the TESOL classroom will be put under scrutiny. Participants are encouraged to contribute more examples of diversity to our discourse in class. Heteronormativity, e.g. as reflected in text books, could be a starting point for a critical discussion of the state of affairs in German schools. How can equality, diversity and inclusion actually be put into practice? What are practical tools for pluralistic approaches in TESOL classes? The idea of an inclusive classroom in Lower Saxony and its curricular manifestations will be amended by examples of other institutions, e.g. the British Council. In this context, different documents, concepts, resources and interviews with practitioners will be studied and critically reflected upon. One particular displacement story will serve as a starting point to ask how literary learning can contribute to a more diverse approach towards TESOL teaching. The course finishes by focusing on the question how differentiation can foster learning in the TESOL classroom. The concept of differentiation will be examined from a variety of angles and examples from teaching materials and textbooks serve as an opportunity to practise one`s analytical skills. Scaffolding is another important term participants need to be familiar with. Relevant references in the field will have to be studied in order to prepare for the final assessment. Assessment issues: Participants are expected to -contribute to discourse during class. -provide samples of their work. -pass an end-of-term test (written assessment / “E-Klausur”)
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.103 Ü Spoken English: Higher Education in North America Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.150 S Natural History in Contemporary Fiction Thursday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/2021-22_AM_Natural_History_in_Contemporary_Fiction http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/2021-22_AM_Natural_History_in_Contemporary_Fiction
Seminar 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.049 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Alena Cicholewski
  • Bachelor
3.02.221 S Britain after Brexit: Disunited Kingdom? Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Richard Stinshoff
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.070 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.980 S Literature, Gender, and Canon (Trans-)Formation: An Integrated Approach Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
Introductory seminars or lectures about American literature all too often still introduce a white male-dominated literary canon, specifically when it comes to early American literature and the 19th century. Hence, in the course of your studies, you would then choose elective courses with a specific focus on various social (minority) groups and their literary achievements such as women, African Americans, Asian Americans, Native Americans, working class women, etc. In this class, we will attempt an integrated approach, that is, we will discuss and study white male canonical authors alongside the writings of their white and black female peers. In doing so, we will re-consider processes at work which have historically shaped the making of literary canons. Guiding questions will be: How did the 19th century construct the literary category of “women’s literature” and what values/lack of value was attached to this category? How do we construct “women’s literature” today and what values do we assign to it? Who had access to the necessary social and cultural capital in order to be published? What literary conventions were necessary – and which were taboo – to become an author of “high” literature? How did authors resist and circumvent those conventions? What about questions of aesthetics, i.e. what principles were/are used to produce beauty and “artistic greatness”? What feelings and sensations do our reading materials elicit and how do they achieve that? Are questions of aesthetics still relevant today, and how so? Please note: This course will include an online student exchange (ca. 5 study meetings and 1-2 more interpersonal ones) with a class by Prof. Dr. Ginzburg from Oranim College in Israel (http://en.oranim.ac.il/). Because we could not get the same time slots, our joint meetings will probably be scheduled for week day evenings from 18.00-20.00. Students who participate in the sessions with Oranim in the evening meetings can, of course, skip our session in the afternoon. The first meeting with Oranim is anticipated for the second week of the semester/last week of October. Please check the "news" on Stud.IP for the exact day and date. Please also note that this course takes place online. The schedule and reading materials for each session will be made available at the beginning of the semester. Please purchase and read the following primary texts, preferably in the critical Norton edition: - Nathaniel Hawthorne. The House of the Seven Gables. 1851. New York: W.W. Norton, 2020: https://wwnorton.com/books/9780393679465/about-the-book/product-details. - Harriet Jacobs. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. 1861. New York: W.W. Norton, 2018: https://wwnorton.com/books/9780393614565/about-the-book/product-details. The other reading materials are online sources and/or will be made available on Stud.IP: - Edgar Allan Poe. “The Purloined Letter.” Tales. New York: Wiley and Putnam, 1845. 200-218. https://archive.org/details/tales00poee/page/218/mode/2up. - Anna Katharine Green. “XYZ: A Detective Story.” New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1883. EBook. Gutenberg Project: https://archive.org/details/xyz-a-detective-story-1883/page/1/mode/2up. - Henry James. “A Landscape Painter.” Stories Revived. London: Macmillan and Co, 1885. 376-428. https://archive.org/details/storiesrevived0000jame/page/n9/mode/2up. - Harriet Prescott Spofford. “Desert Sands.” The Amber Gods and Other Stories. Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1883. 173-216. https://archive.org/details/ambergodsandothe00spofrich/page/174/mode/2up. Introductory seminars or lectures about American literature all too often still introduce a white male-dominated literary canon, specifically when it comes to early American literature and the 19th century. Hence, in the course of your studies, you would then choose elective courses with a specific focus on various social (minority) groups and their literary achievements such as women, African Americans, Asian Americans, Native Americans, working class women, etc. In this class, we will attempt an integrated approach, that is, we will discuss and study white male canonical authors alongside the writings of their white and black female peers. In doing so, we will re-consider processes at work which have historically shaped the making of literary canons. Guiding questions will be: How did the 19th century construct the literary category of “women’s literature” and what values/lack of value was attached to this category? How do we construct “women’s literature” today and what values do we assign to it? Who had access to the necessary social and cultural capital in order to be published? What literary conventions were necessary – and which were taboo – to become an author of “high” literature? How did authors resist and circumvent those conventions? What about questions of aesthetics, i.e. what principles were/are used to produce beauty and “artistic greatness”? What feelings and sensations do our reading materials elicit and how do they achieve that? Are questions of aesthetics still relevant today, and how so? Please note: This course will include an online student exchange (ca. 5 study meetings and 1-2 more interpersonal ones) with a class by Prof. Dr. Ginzburg from Oranim College in Israel (http://en.oranim.ac.il/). Because we could not get the same time slots, our joint meetings will probably be scheduled for week day evenings from 18.00-20.00. Students who participate in the sessions with Oranim in the evening meetings can, of course, skip our session in the afternoon. The first meeting with Oranim is anticipated for the second week of the semester/last week of October. Please check the "news" on Stud.IP for the exact day and date. Please also note that this course takes place online. The schedule and reading materials for each session will be made available at the beginning of the semester. Please purchase and read the following primary texts, preferably in the critical Norton edition: - Nathaniel Hawthorne. The House of the Seven Gables. 1851. New York: W.W. Norton, 2020: https://wwnorton.com/books/9780393679465/about-the-book/product-details. - Harriet Jacobs. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. 1861. New York: W.W. Norton, 2018: https://wwnorton.com/books/9780393614565/about-the-book/product-details. The other reading materials are online sources and/or will be made available on Stud.IP: - Edgar Allan Poe. “The Purloined Letter.” Tales. New York: Wiley and Putnam, 1845. 200-218. https://archive.org/details/tales00poee/page/218/mode/2up. - Anna Katharine Green. “XYZ: A Detective Story.” New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1883. EBook. Gutenberg Project: https://archive.org/details/xyz-a-detective-story-1883/page/1/mode/2up. - Henry James. “A Landscape Painter.” Stories Revived. London: Macmillan and Co, 1885. 376-428. https://archive.org/details/storiesrevived0000jame/page/n9/mode/2up. - Harriet Prescott Spofford. “Desert Sands.” The Amber Gods and Other Stories. Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1883. 173-216. https://archive.org/details/ambergodsandothe00spofrich/page/174/mode/2up.
Seminar 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Master of Education
  • Master
20.01.320 English for University Studies 5 - Academic Reading an Writing 1 Tuesday: 08:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
Language course 4 Eric Ahlberg, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.990 S Little Women Through the Ages: Film Adaptations of Louisa May Alcott's Classic Children's Story Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)

Description:
Greta Gerwig’s 2019 film adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women (1868) is the latest of numerous adaptations for the theater, television, and film. Indeed, the novel’s many cross-medial versions have not only contributed to the continuing appeal of the 19th-century children’s classic, each of them has also provided its very own interpretation and added yet another layer of meaning to the 19th-century novel. Hence, and alongside our study of Alcott’s children’s classic itself, this class focuses on the four feature films of Little Women from 1933, 1949, 1994, and 2019. The course aims to familiarize students with central theoretical aspects of the adaptation of novels into films in order to develop an understanding of the specific variation, accentuation, and interpretation which each of the film adaptations has produced under changing cultural, historical, and cinematic contexts. Please note: This course takes place online and we won’t be meeting every week. You will find the schedule that marks online sessions and study weeks in the course syllabus that will be made available at the beginning of the semester together with the other reading materials. Please purchase and read/watch the following primary texts: - Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women. 1868. Eds. Anne K. Phillips and Gregory Eiselein. New York: W.W. Norton, 2004: https://wwnorton.com/books/9780393976144/about-the-book/product-details. (part I and II) - the film version directed by Gillian Armstrong (1994); - Greta Gerwig’s adaptation (2019). The other two versions from 1933 and 1949 are available online: - George Cukor’s adaptation with Katharine Hepburn (1933): https://archive.org/details/LittleWomen1933; - Meryn Leroy’s version from 1949: https://archive.org/details/LittleWomen1949. Greta Gerwig’s 2019 film adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women (1868) is the latest of numerous adaptations for the theater, television, and film. Indeed, the novel’s many cross-medial versions have not only contributed to the continuing appeal of the 19th-century children’s classic, each of them has also provided its very own interpretation and added yet another layer of meaning to the 19th-century novel. Hence, and alongside our study of Alcott’s children’s classic itself, this class focuses on the four feature films of Little Women from 1933, 1949, 1994, and 2019. The course aims to familiarize students with central theoretical aspects of the adaptation of novels into films in order to develop an understanding of the specific variation, accentuation, and interpretation which each of the film adaptations has produced under changing cultural, historical, and cinematic contexts. Please note: This course takes place online and we won’t be meeting every week. You will find the schedule that marks online sessions and study weeks in the course syllabus that will be made available at the beginning of the semester together with the other reading materials. Please purchase and read/watch the following primary texts: - Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women. 1868. Eds. Anne K. Phillips and Gregory Eiselein. New York: W.W. Norton, 2004: https://wwnorton.com/books/9780393976144/about-the-book/product-details. (part I and II) - the film version directed by Gillian Armstrong (1994); - Greta Gerwig’s adaptation (2019). The other two versions from 1933 and 1949 are available online: - George Cukor’s adaptation with Katharine Hepburn (1933): https://archive.org/details/LittleWomen1933; - Meryn Leroy’s version from 1949: https://archive.org/details/LittleWomen1949.
Seminar 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.060 TUT Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Wednesday: 19:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
Tutorial 1 Tabea Hirsch
  • Bachelor
3.02.175 V Research Methods in Linguistics Thursday: 14:00 - 15:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
The lecture “Methods in Language Variation and Change” accompanies one of the linguistic seminars in ang617/ang618 and is meant for students registered for these courses to develop basic methodological skills in the topic areas of language variation and change. Unlike many other disciplines in the humanities, linguistics has a very empirical research tradition. To get the data needed for empirical research, there are various methods of data collection which all come with a number of limitations and advantages. In this course, we will introduce and evaluate different methods of data collection, making you familiar with the advantages and disadvantages of them all and discuss critically the suitability for your research questions. In the lecture, we will guide students to develop different methodological skills and competences, such as: - the ability to formulate a valid (and manageable) research question - the ability to choose the appropriate approach to answering this research question (i.e. e.g. qualitative vs. quantitative research) - the ability to choose the appropriate method(s) of data collection to answer this question - the ability to choose the appropriate participants/ language corpus to answer this question - the ability to analyse the data - the ability to choose and present relevant results - the ability to structure linguistic papers - etc. The course is meant to give you a hands-on experience in working empirically yourself – from developing a research question to analysing and presenting your data. Therefore, the teaching methods in this course will vary from regular lectures in the first part to (individual) counselling and consultation about your own projects (be it posters, term papers or other kinds of examination). Students who registered for one of the linguistic seminars in ang617 also need to register for this lecture. The lecture “Methods in Language Variation and Change” accompanies one of the linguistic seminars in ang617/ang618 and is meant for students registered for these courses to develop basic methodological skills in the topic areas of language variation and change. Unlike many other disciplines in the humanities, linguistics has a very empirical research tradition. To get the data needed for empirical research, there are various methods of data collection which all come with a number of limitations and advantages. In this course, we will introduce and evaluate different methods of data collection, making you familiar with the advantages and disadvantages of them all and discuss critically the suitability for your research questions. In the lecture, we will guide students to develop different methodological skills and competences, such as: - the ability to formulate a valid (and manageable) research question - the ability to choose the appropriate approach to answering this research question (i.e. e.g. qualitative vs. quantitative research) - the ability to choose the appropriate method(s) of data collection to answer this question - the ability to choose the appropriate participants/ language corpus to answer this question - the ability to analyse the data - the ability to choose and present relevant results - the ability to structure linguistic papers - etc. The course is meant to give you a hands-on experience in working empirically yourself – from developing a research question to analysing and presenting your data. Therefore, the teaching methods in this course will vary from regular lectures in the first part to (individual) counselling and consultation about your own projects (be it posters, term papers or other kinds of examination). Students who registered for one of the linguistic seminars in ang617 also need to register for this lecture.
Lecture 1 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
20.01.322 English Success at Work 5 - Communication Skills Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 22/10/21)

Description:
The Success in Business Course is composed of 3 business courses (Application Skills; Communication Skills; Grammar and Vocabulary Skills). http://www.uni-oldenburg.de/fk3/sprachenzentrum/sprachen/englisch/kursangebot/success-in-business/ The Success in Business Course is composed of 3 business courses (Application Skills; Communication Skills; Grammar and Vocabulary Skills). http://www.uni-oldenburg.de/fk3/sprachenzentrum/sprachen/englisch/kursangebot/success-in-business/
Language course 2 Richard Dawton
  • Bachelor
20.01.317 English for University Studies 4 - Reading and Speaking Monday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)
Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Language course 4 Dr. Maike Engelhardt
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.997 Ü English Language Help Centre Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
3.02.930 S World Englishes Thursday: 14:00 - 17:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Seminar 3 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.072 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.020 V Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, fortnightly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
Lecture 1 Prof. Dr. Marcel Schlechtweg
  • Bachelor
3.02.995 S Literary Theory for MA Students Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, fortnightly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Seminar 1 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Master
3.02.302 KO Research Colloquium in Language Use, Variation and Change Wednesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.511 Ü Betreuung des Fachpraktikums Englisch vor Ort (Gym) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
This course aims at widening your planning and teaching skills as a reflective practitioner. In a school environment you are going to put your knowledge and previous teaching expertise to the test by checking its viability in a real-life classroom. Please invite me for teaching observations at the earliest opportunity. For a supervised lesson observation you will be required to submit a lesson plan and be prepared to discuss lesson outcomes afterwards. The aim is to make the most of your field experience. This course aims at widening your planning and teaching skills as a reflective practitioner. In a school environment you are going to put your knowledge and previous teaching expertise to the test by checking its viability in a real-life classroom. Please invite me for teaching observations at the earliest opportunity. For a supervised lesson observation you will be required to submit a lesson plan and be prepared to discuss lesson outcomes afterwards. The aim is to make the most of your field experience.
Exercises - Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.024 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Wednesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.101 Ü Spoken English: Germany Through an Anglophone Lens Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.031 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
Tutorial - Edda Hagemann
  • Bachelor
3.02.048 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 22/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.02.071 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Monday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
20.01.323 Wirtschaftsenglisch 1 Monday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)
Wednesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
Language course 4 Tim Dittmann
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.309 KO Research Colloquium in Language Use, Variation and Change Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.310 DS Directed Studies The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
miscellaneous - Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.040 V Introduction to Literary History and Textual Analysis Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Lecture 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Bachelor
3.02.171 S From Semantics to Pragmatics: Putting Meaning into Context Monday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)

Description:
How can we convey meaning to a hearer successfully? How can a hearer understand what a speaker means? This course aims to provide the students with a holistic understanding of the differences between meaning in and out of context. Therefore, we are going to investigate the elusive line between semantics and pragmatics. Although this course introduces pragmatic theories, it nevertheless relies on practical examples of spoken language to show which areas of natural language these theories describe. In other words: The theories introduced in this course are all applicable to communicative situations we all are familiar with. How can we convey meaning to a hearer successfully? How can a hearer understand what a speaker means? This course aims to provide the students with a holistic understanding of the differences between meaning in and out of context. Therefore, we are going to investigate the elusive line between semantics and pragmatics. Although this course introduces pragmatic theories, it nevertheless relies on practical examples of spoken language to show which areas of natural language these theories describe. In other words: The theories introduced in this course are all applicable to communicative situations we all are familiar with.
Seminar - Robert Sowa
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.403 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Designing Speaking Activities Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.113 Ü Written English: College Commencement Speeches Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.405 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Teacher Talk in ELT Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 21/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.043 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Wednesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 20/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
3.02.005 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Monday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Michelle Kerkhoff
  • Bachelor
3.02.030 Ü Repetitorium: Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Monday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 18/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.307 KO New Research on English Literatures and Cultures Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.501 Ü Vorbereitung der Praxisphase GHR 300 im Unterrichtsfach Englisch Friday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 22/10/21)

Description:
Exercises 1 Edeltraud Breiter
Alexandra Köhler
Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Master of Education
3.02.058 TUT Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Tuesday: 19:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
Tutorial 1 Matthias Himstedt
  • Bachelor
3.02.080 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 19/10/21)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 John-Martin Winter
  • Bachelor
130 Seminars

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