Stud.IP Uni Oldenburg
University of Oldenburg
20.04.2019 16:12:55
Veranstaltungsverzeichnis

III: School of Linguistics and Cultural Studies Click here for PDF-Download

Summer semester 2019 121 Seminars
VAK Course Number Title Type Lecture
Preliminary studies
Advanced courses
Practical course
Colloquium
Research group
Workgroup
Project group
Council conference
Internship
Language course
Subject didactics
Excursion
Tutorial
Committee
SWS Semester weekly hours Teachers Degree
3.02.180 S English Grammar Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Cornelia Hamann
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.308 KO Anglistisches-Amerikanistisches Forschungskolloquium Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
3.02.049 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Bettina Soller
  • Bachelor
3.02.055 Repetitorium: Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Friday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 12/04/19)

Description:
Miscellaneous 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.03.312 Fonologie van het Nederlands Wednesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 03/04/19)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Marijke De Belder
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.304 KO New Research in American Studies: Fach Anglistik und Amerikanistik/ Englisch Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
Colloquium - Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
20.01.314 Englisch Aufbaumodul 2 B Thursday: 12:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Language course 4 Geraldine Barry
  • Bachelor
3.02.079 (j) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Discovering Canadian Culture Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
3.02.530 Ü Betreuung des Praxisblocks vor Ort im Fach Englisch (HR) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Exercises - Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Master of Education
3.02.086 Organisation and Supervision of Compulsory Stay Abroad The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Exercises - Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.150 S Margaret Atwood's Dystopian Visions in Text and Film Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
In this course, we will study two dystopias from very different historical contexts by the Canadian writer Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale with its focus on future prospects of neo-conservative political and religious trends from the mid-1980s U.S.; and the The Heart Goes Last, which offers a more recent view of how socio-economic collapse makes Western democracies turn into societies ruled by paranoia and prison regimes. We will read both novels within the larger generic concepts of utopias/dystopias in the tradition of George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four or H. G. Wells’s The Island of Dr. Moreau. But we will also examine how Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale has been adapted as TV series, that is, received and interpreted as a work of its own, taking into consideration its medium-specificity and the present-day concerns and anxieties that infuse this reception of Atwood's 1980s novel. Please purchase and read: Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale (1985); Bruce Miller, The Handmaid’s Tale, TV series, season 1, 2017; Margaret Atwood, The Heart Goes Last (2015).
Seminar 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.047 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Friday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 12/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.02.190 S Intercultural Communicative Competence Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.481 S Methodology in ELT Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 03/04/19)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Master of Education
3.02.101 Ü Spoken English: Social Classes Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 03/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dana Strakova
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.022 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 03/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
3.02.315 DS Directed Studies The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Miscellaneous - Dr. Julius Greve
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
20.01.324 English for University Studies - Writing, Reading A Tuesday: 12:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
Language course - M.A. Eric Ahlberg
  • Bachelor
3.02.104 Ü Spoken English: Social Classes Wednesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 03/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dana Strakova
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.081 (d) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: American history, politics and culture Tuesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
The “Academic Speaking and Writing Skills” courses make up the second part of the Sprachpraxis module ang080. These are practical courses geared toward teaching you how to give effective presentations in an academic setting and developing your academic writing ability, as well as introducing the culture, language and society of the United States of America. In this course, you will prepare and give a short presentation, lead a discussion activity, write an in-class writing task as well as complete language assignments focussing on useful language for academic speaking and writing. As with “Introduction to Integrated Language Skills”, the course is graded on a pass-fail basis.
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
20.01.321 English for University Studies - Comprehensive Language practice Thursday: 08:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Language course - Richard Dawton
  • Bachelor
3.02.405 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Designing Reading Materials Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
What kinds of written materials should English language teachers use in class? Are authentic written texts more appropriate for classroom use than simplified texts? Should teachers provide students with German translations of all the difficult English vocabulary in a text? How can I create a reading comprehension task? How do I write instructions? These are some of the questions we will discuss and find answers to in this course. The main aim of this course is for students to practice selecting effective, level‐appropriate reading materials for the English language classroom and to design tasks to accompany them. In order to achieve this, students will be expected to design their own reading worksheets based on both authentic and simplified texts. Assessment: Students will be assessed via a portfolio, which will include designing two reading worksheets. Additionally, students will be expected to participate actively in class, including taking part in workshops. Note: For students studying MEd (Gym) and MA (English Studies), this course forms half of the compulsory module ang900: Language Skills for Proficiency, and is graded. For students studying Med (GHR) and MEd (WiPäd), the course is part of ang702 and is assessed on a pass-fail basis.
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.044 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
3.02.302 KO Language Use, Variation and Change: Fach Anglistik/ Englisch Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.003 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Monday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 01/04/19)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Nathalie Bies
  • Bachelor
3.02.303 KO New Research in Applied and Theoretical Linguistics Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 01/04/19)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Cornelia Hamann
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.402 Ü Academic Discourse: Media Translation Monday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 01/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.088 Ü English Language Help Centre Monday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 01/04/19)

Description:
This is a drop-in help centre for students who need additional help or would simply like to improve their English language skills. PLEASE NOTE: There are no credit points attached to this course.
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.307 KO New Research on English Literatures and Cultures Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.048 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Wednesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 03/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Bettina Soller
  • Bachelor
3.02.006 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 (Maik Harms) Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 24/04/19)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Maik Harms
  • Bachelor
3.02.023 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 03/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
20.01.326 Wirtschaftsenglisch 1 A Tuesday: 12:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
In der Sprache Englisch wird ein 6-minütiger mündlicher Einstufungstest vorausgesetzt, der zu folgenden Terminen stattfindet: 19.02.2019 von 9-13 Uhr 25.03.2019 von 9-15 Uhr 26.03.2019 von 9-15 Uhr 27.03.2019 von 9-13 Uhr Für die Anmeldung tragen Sie sich bitte bei einer der folgenden Personen in Stud.IP! für die Sprechstundentermine ein: Maike Engelhardt, Richard Dawton, Eric Ahlberg und Geraldine Barry
Language course 4 Geraldine Barry
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.024 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
3.02.080 (g) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: American history, politics and culture Wednesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 03/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.02.026 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
3.03.311 Forensic linguistics: authorship identification Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 03/04/19)

Description:
This course will introduce you to the field of forensic linguistics. Forensic linguistics concerns itself with applying linguistic knowledge and methods to legal settings. It is therefore a very broad field which deals with issues like speaker identification, authorship attribution and profiling, plagiarism but also native language determination for asylum procedures, suicide notes, the authenticity of wills and fabricated evidence or manipulated transcripts of police interviews. We will focus on selected topics within the field of forensic linguistics, namely authorship attribution, native language identification and native language determination. In doing so, we will look at linguistic theory and apply it to forensic settings, paying specific attention to scientific reliability.
Seminar 2 Dr. Ankelien Schippers
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.140 S for Superheroes: Alan Moore's Graphic Novels V for Vendetta, Watchmen, and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
S For Superheroes In the 1980s, the figure of the superhero experienced an unprecedented deconstruction that has had a lasting impact on the perception of this comic-book stock character. Crossing over to the dark side, the (anti-)heroes of Alan Moore's graphic novels %%V for Vendetta%%, %%Watchmen%% and %%The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen%% now come across as the gloomy alter egos of their less complex and certainly less multi-faceted predecessors. In the seminar, we will be investigating the historical, political, and literary contexts that caused this shift in the genre conventions of the graphic novel as well as their cultural side effects, which have moved the genre as a whole onto dystopian terrain. Please read: Moore, Alan and Kevin O'Neill. %%The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen%%. Omnibus Edition. New York, NY: Vertigo, 2013. [ISBN-13: 978-1401240837] Moore, Alan and David Lloyd. %%V for Vendetta%%. New York, NY: Vertigo, 2008 [ISBN-13: 978-1401208417] Moore, Alan and Dave Gibbons. %%Watchmen%%. Burbank, CA: DC Comics, 2014. [ISBN-13: 978-1401245252]
Seminar 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.202 S Media Literacy in ELT Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 01/04/19), Location: A07 0-025
Dates on Monday. 17.06.19 08:00 - 10:00, Room: A01 0-006

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Birte Sause
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.970 S Digital Worlds in Contemporary Fiction and Serial TV Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Digital technologies and digital media continue to become an ever greater part of contemporary individual and social life. There appears to be a consensus that this process is inevitable, but there is next to no agreement with respect to the ways in which individuals and society are affected by it. Responses range from euphoria and enthusiasm on the one hand, to dystopian visions of a future societies totally under surveillance and control. Contradictory assessments of contemporary situations, and contradictory expectations about future developments can be found in the leading media of fictional narratives – the novel and the TV serial – as well. Our course will offer an opportunity to engage with these issues through the analysis of a range of fictional narratives representing worlds which are shaped and informed in various forms by digital technologies. We will focus both on ‘dystopian’ and on ‘realistic’ representations of digital worlds, and analyse two novels as well as (selectively) work on two TV series whose evolving engagement with digital technologies and media may help us also to historicise the evolving perspectives on the digital over the past two decades. The two novels in question are: Hari Kunzru, Transmission (2004), and Lauren Beukes, Moxyland (2008). These are available in the University bookshop. Please purchase and read these as early as possible. The two TV series chosen for this course are Black Mirror (4 seasons, 2011-2017) and South Park (22 seasons, 1997-2018). Please view as many episodes of these series as possible in preparation for the course (South Park is free in Germany on www.southpark.de; Black Mirror is on Netflix; both series are on DVD as part of a Handapparat to our course in the university library). I will suggest a selection of episodes for us to analyse but am happy to discuss suggestions. It may be helpful to use online resources giving short summaries of the episodes (such as, for instance, en.wikipedia.org) in order to pre-select relevant episodes. Credits are obtained by participating in an oral presentation and producing a written term paper based on one aspect of this presentation (6 or 9 KP, depending on your course of study). M.A. students will be required to submit an additional ‘project’ (3 KP). This can take a variety of forms (but you cannot write a second term paper). The general requirement is to take one aspect of the seminar as a point of departure, and pursue some form of empirical research which takes you beyond the scope of the seminar. Details to be discussed individually.
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.040 V Historical Backgrounds and Critical Concepts Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Lecture 2 Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Bachelor
3.02.046 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Exercises - Dr. Julius Greve
  • Bachelor
3.02.073 (a) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Great Britain Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dana Strakova
  • Bachelor
20.01.320 Englisch - Success in Business - Grammar and Vocabulary Skills Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
The Success in Business Course is composed of 3 business courses (Application Skills; Communication Skills; Grammar and Vocabulary Skills). http://www.uni-oldenburg.de/fk3/sprachenzentrum/sprachen/englisch/kursangebot/success-in-business/
Language course - Richard Dawton
  • Bachelor
3.02.111 Ü Written English: Environment Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 01/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dana Strakova
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.162 S Learner Language Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
Seminar 2 M.A. Lina Abed Ibrahim, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.309 KO Language Use, Variation and Change: Fach Anglistik/ Englisch Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 01/04/19)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.070 (h) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Lands Down Under Wednesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 03/04/19), Location: A10 1-121a
Dates on Thursday. 18.07.19 10:00 - 12:00, Room: A11 1-101 (Hörsaal B)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.165 VL Research Methods in Theoretical and Applied Linguistics Friday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 05/04/19)

Description:
Lecture 2 M.A. Lina Abed Ibrahim, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.950 S Pronouns: Syntax, Semantics and Acquisition Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Cornelia Hamann
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.191 S Making Learning Visible in the EFL Classroom Monday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 01/04/19)

Description:
On successful completion of this module, students should - be familiar with current research in the field of evidence-based teaching, especially John Hattie`s Visible Learning and Visible Learning for Teachers -be able to explain the difference between competence-based teaching as opposed to instructive approaches -be familiar with the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) and be able to explain its significance and the impact it has had on language teaching -know and be able to analyze syllabuses and curricula aimed at different age and ability groups -be able to develop and evaluate lesson plans relying on the task-based approach but also on “classical” ways of lesson planning (PPP) - be able to critically consider a variety of assessment methods suitable for classroom use -be able to plan for differentiation in accordance with the syllabus -be able to comment on “real-life” case studies of individuals and groups of language learners thus practicing their diagnostic skills -make informed decisions on methods, seating, use of media etc. in light of current research-be aware of the way culture shapes attitudes towards (language) -learning and teaching and develop realistic goals for intercultural skills and communication, both in the classroom and beyond Participants are expected to: -provide commentaries on topics discussed in class -pass a written exam (“Klausur”) at the end of the semester
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.110 Ü Written English: Exploration and Expeditions Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 04/04/19), Location: A10 1-121a
Dates on Thursday. 18.07.19 12:00 - 14:00, Room: A11 1-101 (Hörsaal B)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
20.01.313 Englisch Aufbaumodul 2 A Tuesday: 12:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
Language course - Dr. Maike Engelhardt
  • Bachelor
3.02.980 S Growing Up/ Growing Sideways: Heteronormativity and the Queer Child Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 01/04/19)

Description:
Growing Up/ Growing Sideways: Heteronormativity and the Queer Child In this seminar, we will be exploring different ways and concepts of growing up, both theoretically and with regard to literary and cinematic representations from Lewis Carroll's %%Alice's Adventures in Wonderland%% (1865) to Peter Cameron's %%Someday this Pain Will Be Useful to You%% (2007). As growth in a (hetero-) normative culture is generally defined as a directed movement toward deeply held values like marriage, parenthood, or a 'carreer', prevalent notions of growing up may turn out to be a stumbling block or even a hindrance to developing a healthy sense of self. In order to examine and deconstruct the ways by which (hetero-) normative culture construes the identity of the Child (in the name of the child), we will be analysing the representation of %%queer%% children – in the widest sense, i.e. from so-called %%problem children%% to %%protogay children%%. Please read/ watch: %%Billy Elliot%%. Dir. Stephen Daldry. Perf. Jamie Bell, Julie Walters, Gary Lewis, Jamie Draven, and Adam Cooper. 2000. Universal, 2003. DVD. Cameron, Peter. %%Someday this Pain Will Be Useful to You%%. New York: Picador, 2011. Carroll, Lewis. %%Alice in Wonderland%%. Ed. Donald J. Gray. New York and London: Norton, 2013. %%Little Miss Sunshine%%. Dir. Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris. Perf. Greg Kinnear, Toni Collette, Steve Carell, Paul Dano, Abigail Breslin, and Alan Alda. 2006. Twentieth Century Fox, 2013. DVD.
Seminar 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.317 DS Directed Studies The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Miscellaneous - Dr. Galena Hashhozheva
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.014 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Thursday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Kim Ahrens
  • Bachelor
3.02.025 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Friday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 05/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Rabea Thorwesten
  • Bachelor
3.02.141 S Nineteenth-Century Fictions of Postapocalyptic England Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
Post-apocalyptic narratives have become quite a popular genre in contemporary fiction and popular culture. In recent years, there has been no shortage of scenarios set in a more or less close or distant future, imagining humanity seriously decimated by various types of catastrophe – from climate change and atomic disasters to invasions by zombies, robots or aliens. In the nineteenth century, such fictional anticipations of the downfall of human society were far less frequent, but they nevertheless existed. This course offers a chance to encounter and analyse two of these early postapocalyptic novels: The Last Man (1826) by Mary Shelley, author of Frankenstein; and After London; or Wild England (1885) by Richard Jefferies. Both novels can be obtained from the university bookshop. They must be used only in the editions provided there: The Last Man in Oxford World’s Classics, ed. by Morton D. Paley; After London in the Edinburgh Critical Edition, ed. by Mark Frost. The regular Prüfungsform for this course is “Referat mit Ausarbeitung”. All alternatives need to be agreed with me, please contact me early if zou have reason to seek such an alternative.
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.403 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Error Correction Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.998 S Multiple Imaginations: Germany's Pasts and Presents Dates on Friday. 10.05.19 16:00 - 20:00, Saturday. 11.05.19, Saturday. 18.05.19 10:00 - 19:00
Description:
In this seminar, we will work on different narratives about and representations of what is imagined – in different times and under different (political, social, economic) circumstances – as ‘Germany’. We will explore what ‘Germany’ supposedly is and gain a deeper understanding of it. With a cultural studies perspective we will look at what and who is represented by whom as ‘German(y)’, who and what is excluded by the narratives, what the specific circumstances for specific narratives are, and which counter-narratives can be found. The aim of the seminar is not to study what is called ‘Germany’ or ‘Europe’ but to learn about representation and perspectives of (multiple) self-imaginations, how they are constructed in different narratives and which functions these imaginations serve. In the context of this seminar, we do a joint study trip to the Auswandererhaus in Bremerhaven to explore different narratives and representations about Germany’s past and present. With a selection of texts and short films we will examine issues of exclusion and inclusion, and their implications.
Seminar - Sunday Omwenyeke
3.02.160 S Comparing Languages: Language Stages and Language Varieties Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Cornelia Hamann
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.029 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Robert Sowa
  • Bachelor
3.02.112 Ü Written English: Environment Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dana Strakova
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.076 (m) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Great Britain Friday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 05/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dana Strakova
  • Bachelor
3.02.004 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 (Maik Harms) Tuesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 23/04/19)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Maik Harms
  • Bachelor
3.02.050 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Friday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 05/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
3.02.077 (b) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Discovering Canadian Culture Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
The “Academic Speaking and Writing Skills” courses make up the second part of the Sprachpraxis module ang080. These are practical courses geared toward teaching you how to give effective presentations in an academic setting and developing your academic writing ability, as well as introducing the culture, language and society of different Anglophone countries. In this course, the focus will be on Canadian history and culture. In this course, you will prepare and give a short presentation, lead a discussion activity, write an in-class writing task as well as complete language assignments focussing on useful language for academic speaking and writing. As with “Introduction to Integrated Language Skills”, the course is graded on a pass-fail basis.
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
3.09.042 Sex, Sexuality and Human Rights – African experiences, with a focus on South Africa Dates on Friday. 21.06.19 12:00 - 18:00, Saturday. 22.06.19 10:00 - 16:00, Friday. 05.07.19 12:00 - 18:00, Saturday. 06.07.19 10:00 - 16:00, Friday. 12.07.19 12:00 - 18:00
Description:
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Sheila Meintjes
Dr. Lydia Potts
  • Bachelor
3.02.074 (e) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Great Britain Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 03/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dana Strakova
  • Bachelor
3.02.305 KO New Research in American Literary and Cultural Studies Tuesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
This course is open to all students who are preparing to write - or are already in the process of writing - their BA and MA theses in American literary and cultural studies, or who want to do a research module (Recherchemodul). Here, students will hone their academic writings skills through various writing exercises, develop an exposé in the course of the term, and present the results of their work in progress. The course also offers opportunities to discuss seminal theoretical texts central to the research projects of the individual participants. Requirements: regular attendance; development and presentation of an exposé; completion of writing assignments; active participation in class discussions.
Colloquium - PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
10.33.346 Introduction to Statistics for Linguists Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 02/04/19), Location: V02 1-112
Friday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 05/04/19), Location: A02 2-203

Description:
Seminar 4 Dr. István Fekete
  • Master
3.02.310 DS Directed Studies The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Miscellaneous - Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.085 Additional Grammar Practice The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Exercises - Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
20.01.318 Englisch - Success in Business - Application Skills Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
The Success in Business Course is composed of 3 business courses (Application Skills; Communication Skills; Grammar and Vocabulary Skills). http://www.uni-oldenburg.de/fk3/sprachenzentrum/sprachen/englisch/kursangebot/success-in-business/
Language course - Richard Dawton
  • Bachelor
3.02.002 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Monday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 01/04/19)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Tobias Rohling
  • Bachelor
3.02.032 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Tom Wessels
  • Bachelor
3.02.401 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Structuring Lessons around Vocabulary/Grammar Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 01/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dana Strakova
  • Master of Education
  • Master
20.01.328 Wirtschaftsenglisch 2 A Wednesday: 12:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 03/04/19)

Description:
In der Sprache Englisch wird ein 6-minütiger mündlicher Einstufungstest vorausgesetzt, der zu folgenden Terminen stattfindet: 19.02.2019 von 9-13 Uhr 25.03.2019 von 9-15 Uhr 26.03.2019 von 9-15 Uhr 27.03.2019 von 9-13 Uhr Für die Anmeldung tragen Sie sich bitte bei einer der folgenden Personen in Stud.IP! für die Sprechstundentermine ein: Maike Engelhardt, Richard Dawton, Eric Ahlberg und Geraldine Barry
Language course 4 Geraldine Barry
  • Bachelor
3.02.075 (l) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Great Britain Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 05/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dana Strakova
  • Bachelor
3.02.404 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Designing Speaking Activities Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
In this course, we will be focusing on teaching speaking through activities such as role plays and discussions. The main goal is for students to learn how to create effective speaking activities and materials that can be used in the classroom. Assessment: Students will be assessed via a portfolio, which will include designing two speaking activities: one to be submitted in written form (a role play) and the second to be presented in an oral test (a discussion activity). Additionally, students will be expected to participate actively in class, including taking part in workshops. Note: For students studying MEd (Gym) and MA (English Studies), this course forms half of the compulsory module ang900: Language Skills for Proficiency, and is graded. For students studying MEd (WiPäd), the course is part of ang702 and is assessed on a pass-fail basis.
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.021 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
3.02.601 Ü Begleitveranstaltung für TutorInnen der Anglistik/ Amerikanistik: Linguistik/ Sprachwissenschaft The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Exercises - Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
  • Master
20.01.325 English for University Studies - Writing, Reading B Wednesday: 12:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 03/04/19)

Description:
Language course - M.A. Eric Ahlberg
  • Bachelor
3.02.120 S Shakespeare's Sonnets Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Galena Hashhozheva
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.930 S World Englishes Thursday: 14:00 - 17:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Seminar 3 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.131 S Writing the Indian Ocean Friday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 12/04/19)

Description:
Recounting his childhood in East Africa under British colonial rule, the Kenyan writer Ngugi wa’Thiongo recalls Christmas feasts with “plentiful of cabaci, thambutha and mandathi, our version of the Indian chapati, paratha, samosa. The spices, curry, hot pepper and all, so very Indian, had become so central a part of Kenyan African cuisine that I could have sworn that these dishes were truly indigenous. … So African it all seemed to me that when I saw Indians drinking tea or making curry, I thought it the result of African influence.” Such culinary borrowing is only a small sign of the social, cultural, and economic interconnections that define the Indian Ocean. While European colonialism has shaped and intensified these connections, there had been trade, migration, and cultural exchange between East Africa, the Indian subcontinent, and South East Asia for centuries before that. The seminar will look at three representations of these connections in fiction: M.G. Vassanji’s The In-Between World of Vikram Lall, Amitav Ghosh’s In an Antique Land, and Abdulrazak Gurnah’s Paradise. Along the way, we will look at the politics of writing in English in Africa and South Asia and at the emerging cultural theory of Indian Ocean interconnections. Students will also be able to join a field trip to the conference “Postcolonial Oceans” that takes place in Bremen 30 May – 2 June. This will give you both a window into current research on the subject and maybe also spark some ideas for your own research papers. Speaking of which: The seminar will put developing your individual research paper front and centre. Researching secondary literature, developing your hypothesis, and structuring your argument will be discussed in class, and smaller working groups will give you the chance to get individual feedback before you start writing. To this end, there will be a tutorial on Fridays, 12:00-14:00 – make sure to reserve this time slot! A precise schedule will be circulated before the term begins.
Seminar 2 Karsten Levihn-Kutzler
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.028 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Wednesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 03/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Robert Sowa
  • Bachelor
3.02.042 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
3.02.990 S Women, Race, and Myth: Classica Africana from Phillis Wheatley to Toni Morrison Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
One branch of the field of Classica Africana focuses on how African Americans adapted and re-narrated ancient myths. This course seeks to gain an overview over a lineage of black women writers from the eighteenth to the twentieth century and their reception and appropriation of classical myths. We will take into consideration the different social realities and concerns that produced their classical adaptations and examine how these black women artists recreated their life experiences as racialized and silenced ‘Other’ through their experimentation with classical myths. With the help of selected texts from myth and race theory, we will approach the nexus of race, gender, and myth, exploring the ways in which the use of classical myth shapes these black artists’ aesthetic expression and political concerns. Please purchase and read the following novels: Pauline Hopkins, Of One Blood: Or, the Hidden Self (1903); Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937); Toni Morrison, Beloved (1987).
Seminar 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.071 (c) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Lands Down Under Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
Exercises - Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.161 S Bilingual Contexts: Language Attrition and Near-native L2 Acquisition Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 05/04/19)

Description:
This class deals with L2 acquisition in the broad sense, including various background L1s and the forgetting of these L1s, referred to as first language attrition - a phenomenon which is viewed as related to the acquisition of an L2. We will look at different domains of language and consider the impact of cross-linguistic differences on attrition and acquisition. In particular, we will engage with the analysis of interlanguage errors in English and German as second/foreign languages. By the end of the term students will be able to give an elaborate description of the phenomena of bilingualism in question, including factors of influence and related examples.
Seminar 2 Dr. Dobrinka Genevska-Hanke
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.100 Ü Spoken English: Food, glorious food Wednesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 03/04/19)

Description:
Please note that this course will actually take place on WEDNESDAYS from 18:00-20:00! The information will be updated on Stud.IP as soon as possible.
Exercises - Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.311 DS Directed Studies Tuesday: 09:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 09/04/19)

Description:
This course is designed for students preparing to write their final thesis (BA or MA) in the field of Didactics. Looking for suitable and, above all, viable topics, presenting first ideas and subsequently coming up with a plan on how to carry out your actual research will be at the centre of the preparatory process. Candidates will be required to submit and present different types of documents, e.g. literature overview, research proposal, abstract, etc. You will be working independently outside class, preparing findings to peers and supervisors on a regular basis. Standards of academic research and writing will be discussed in plenary sessions. Students are expected to use feedback constructively and thus gradually commit to a final version of their research project.
Miscellaneous 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.534b Ü Begleitung und Nachbereitung der Praxisphase GHR 300 im Unterrichtsfach Englisch Dates on Friday. 01.03.19, Friday. 15.03.19, Friday. 05.04.19, Friday. 26.04.19, Friday. 10.05.19, Friday. 24.05.19, Friday. 14.06.19 12:00 - 14:00, Thursday. 04.07.19 14:00 - 18:00, Friday. 05.07.19 12:00 - 18:00, Room: A01 0-010 b, S 2-206, A05 0-054(+2 more)
Description:
Exercises - Edeltraud Breiter
Alexandra Köhler
Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Master of Education
3.02.103 Ü Spoken English: Higher Education in North America Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 01/04/19)

Description:
The university or college experience on the North American continent differs in certain respects from that in Europe. There are also many differences between higher education in Canada and the United States and the individual institutions. Prospective students can choose between public and private institutions, from two-year colleges to ivy league institutions, and even from a number of minority-serving institutions or specialized institutions such as Aboriginal colleges, historically Black colleges and universities, women’s colleges and military colleges. In this course, students will be given ample opportunity to improve their oral skills as we explore university and college education and undergraduate culture in both the United States and Canada. We will discuss, debate as well as critically examine topics such as student campus life, intercollegiate athletics, the role of specialized and minority-serving institutions, tuition fees and financing options, and social organizations, such as Greek-letter organizations. "Spoken English: Higher Education in North America" forms one half of the compulsory module ang311: Integrated Language Skills. The module is assessed via a portfolio. The assessment requirement for this Spoken English course is a 10 minute oral language test at the end of the semester, with the grade to be added to the result from Written English for the module total.
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.012 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 10/04/19)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Michelle Kerkhoff
  • Bachelor
3.02.013 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 (Emel Cerit) Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Emel Cerit
  • Bachelor
3.02.043 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
3.09.043 Sex, Sexuality and Human Rights – South Asian experiences, with a focus on India Dates on Friday. 21.06.19 12:00 - 18:00, Saturday. 22.06.19 10:00 - 16:00, Friday. 05.07.19 12:00 - 18:00, Saturday. 06.07.19 10:00 - 16:00, Friday. 12.07.19 12:00 - 18:00
Description:
Blockseminar mit Prof. Dr. Paula Banerjee, University of Calcutta, India
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Paula Banerjee
Dr. Lydia Potts
  • Bachelor
3.02.482 Teaching Literature Monday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 01/04/19)

Description:
Teaching literature in the EFL Classroom Amongst the current generation of teaching professionals, the question whether literature – both with a capital and a small `l´- should be used in the EFL classroom is usually answered with a resounding “yes!”. For years critics of the competence-based approach have been calling for literature to be re-established as a means of fostering an education that goes beyond a mere acquisition of a certain skill set. In our digital age the number of literary texts available online as well as the products emerging from the communication between readers, texts and authors open up new types of literary discourse and expression transcending age, nationality and educational background. On the other hand, future teachers of English are bound to come across restrictions regarding their choice of literary works as well as the topics connected to them. German Abitur exams in particular require close scrutiny of the curriculum. Set texts and a variety of linguistic and analytical skills will be required to meet the assessment standards stipulated by the Ministry of Education. From primary school through to the final years of secondary school and Abitur-level both extensive reading of literary texts as well as reading with a view of composing a piece of writing are expected to be fostered systematically. The seminar aims at providing an overview of different literary texts, approaches and methods viable in the EFL classroom. Starting with visualisation techniques, story telling, scenic interpretation and creative writing participants are expected to get actively involved in classes by creating their own literary products and exchanging ideas about the viability of different didactic approaches. Other than that, everyone will be required to provide short keynote presentations on a selection of topics connected to teaching literature. You can put your name down for topics from the second week of term. Against the backdrop of current research in Didactics, participants are expected to analyse teaching and learning materials as well as (excerpts from) current textbooks for various age groups. Different approaches towards teaching literature will be explored. The development of units of work and lesson plans will be informed by relevant theories of language learning and teaching and can be critically applied to a selection of tasks, resources and ideas for projects connected to teaching literature. Lesson planning and the analysis of lessons involves • realistic target setting, • allowing for differentiation, • an appropriate choice of materials and media • as well as devising appropriate assessment strategies. Schemes of work submitted by students will be put under close scrutiny by peers and the lecturer in order to determine their viability in the classroom. Ideally, concepts and strategies will be put into practice during subsequent internships. As regards the submission of coursework as part of your final assessment, all participants are required to hand in a portfolio showing their ability to plan and reflect on lessons and schemes of work or tasks.
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.078 (f) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Discovering Canadian Culture Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 03/04/19)

Description:
The “Academic Speaking and Writing Skills” courses make up the second part of the Sprachpraxis module ang080. These are practical courses geared toward teaching you how to give effective presentations in an academic setting and developing your academic writing ability, as well as introducing the culture, language and society of different Anglophone countries. In this course, the focus will be on Canadian history and culture. In this course, you will prepare and give a short presentation, lead a discussion activity, write an in-class writing task as well as complete language assignments focussing on useful language for academic speaking and writing. As with “Introduction to Integrated Language Skills”, the course is graded on a pass-fail basis.
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
3.02.932 S American Englishes Thursday: 17:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Seminar 3 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.045 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 05/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
3.02.113 Ü Written English: Language Education in Canada Wednesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 03/04/19)

Description:
This Written English course forms one half of the compulsory module ang311: Integrated Language Skills. Comment: In this course, students will be introduced to language education in Canada through texts, videos and podcasts. We will explore language education policies, ideas and issues, focussing on second and foreign language education, as well as Indigenous, minority and heritage language education. Students will work on fine-tuning their academic writing skills and language use through writing texts relating to the course topic. Assessment: Students will be assessed on the following three tasks: (i) a take-home essay (1st draft), (ii) final version of take-home essay and (iii) a written language test.
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.027 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
3.02.306 KO New Research in British and Anglophone Literary and Cultural Studies Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Miscellaneous 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
20.01.319 Englisch - Success in Business - Communication Skills Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
The Success in Business Course is composed of 3 business courses (Application Skills; Communication Skills; Grammar and Vocabulary Skills). http://www.uni-oldenburg.de/fk3/sprachenzentrum/sprachen/englisch/kursangebot/success-in-business/
Language course - Richard Dawton
  • Bachelor
3.02.602 Ü Begleitveranstaltung für TutorInnen der Anglistik/ Amerikanistik: Fachdidaktik Friday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 05/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.020 V Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
Lecture 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
3.02.010 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Tuesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 02/04/19), Location: A14 1-113, V02 0-003

Description:
Tutorial 2 Kseniya Tkachuk
  • Bachelor
3.02.203 S Teaching Culture Monday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 01/04/19)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.114 Ü Written English: Music in social movements Wednesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 03/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.301 KO Abschlusskolloquium: BA, MEd, DoktorandInnen Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 03/04/19)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.201 An Introduction to Teaching Literature Monday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 01/04/19)

Description:
Teaching literature in the EFL Classroom Amongst the current generation of teaching professionals, the question whether literature – both with a capital and a small `l´- should be used in the EFL classroom is usually answered with a resounding “yes!”. For years critics of the competence-based approach have been calling for literature to be re-established as a means of fostering an education that goes beyond a mere acquisition of a certain skill set. In our digital age the number of literary texts available online as well as the products emerging from the communication between readers, texts and authors open up new types of literary discourse and expression transcending age, nationality and educational background. On the other hand, future teachers of English are bound to come across restrictions regarding their choice of literary works as well as the topics connected to them. German Abitur exams in particular require close scrutiny of the curriculum. Set texts and a variety of linguistic and analytical skills will be required to meet the assessment standards stipulated by the Ministry of Education. From primary school through to the final years of secondary school and Abitur-level both extensive reading of literary texts as well as reading with a view of composing a piece of writing are expected to be fostered systematically. The seminar aims at providing an overview of different literary texts, approaches and methods viable in the EFL classroom. Starting with visualisation techniques, story telling, scenic interpretation and creative writing participants are expected to get actively involved in classes by creating their own literary products and exchanging ideas about the viability of different didactic approaches. Against the backdrop of current research in Didactics, participants are expected to analyse teaching and learning materials as well as (excerpts from) current textbooks for various age groups. Different approaches towards teaching literature will be explored. The development of units of work and lesson plans will be informed by relevant theories of language learning and teaching and can be critically applied to a selection of tasks, resources and ideas for projects connected to teaching literature. Lesson planning and the analysis of lessons involves • realistic target setting, • allowing for differentiation, • an appropriate choice of materials and media • as well as devising appropriate assessment strategies. As a final assessment, there will be a test paper at the end of term.
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.102 Ü Spoken English: Higher Education in North America Monday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 01/04/19)

Description:
The university or college experience on the North American continent differs in certain respects from that in Europe. There are also many differences between higher education in Canada and the United States and the individual institutions. Prospective students can choose between public and private institutions, from two-year colleges to ivy league institutions, and even from a number of minority-serving institutions or specialized institutions such as Aboriginal colleges, historically Black colleges and universities, women’s colleges and military colleges. In this course, students will be given ample opportunity to improve their oral skills as we explore university and college education and undergraduate culture in both the United States and Canada. We will discuss, debate as well as critically examine topics such as student campus life, intercollegiate athletics, the role of specialized and minority-serving institutions, tuition fees and financing options, and social organizations, such as Greek-letter organizations. "Spoken English: Higher Education in North America" forms one half of the compulsory module ang311: Integrated Language Skills. The module is assessed via a portfolio. The assessment requirement for this Spoken English course is a 10 minute oral language test at the end of the semester, with the grade to be added to the result from Written English for the module total.
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.534a Ü Begleitung und Nachbereitung der Praxisphase GHR 300 im Unterrichtsfach Englisch Dates on Friday. 01.03.19, Friday. 15.03.19, Friday. 05.04.19, Friday. 26.04.19, Friday. 10.05.19, Friday. 24.05.19, Friday. 14.06.19 08:00 - 10:00, Thursday. 04.07.19 12:00 - 16:00, Friday. 05.07.19 12:00 - 18:00, Room: V02 1-113, V04 0-033, A13 0-027(+2 more)
Description:
Exercises - Christian Kramer, M.A.
Elisabeth Lücken
Kerstin Weerts
  • Master of Education
3.02.041 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
Dr. Julius Greve
  • Bachelor
3.02.480 S Current Issues in ELT Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 02/04/19)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Master of Education
3.02.072 (i) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Lands Down Under Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 04/04/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.532 Ü Betreuung des Praxisblocks vor Ort im Fach Englisch (G) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Exercises - Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Master of Education
3.02.200 S Multiculturalism and Literature Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 01/04/19)

Description:
The seminar provides an overview of postcolonial storytelling and the concept of multiculturalism followed by an analysis of a variety of literary products ranging from the early 80s to the present. Questions of national identity will be covered as well as cultural, political and religious issues. London as a hub of the British multicultural experience will be explored in greater detail. Excerpts from selected texts comprise works by e.g. - Salman Rushdie, Midnight Children, 1981 - Hanif Kureishi, The Buddha of Suburbia, 1990 - Hanif Kureishi, The Black Album, 1995 - Arundhati Roy, The God of the Small Things, 1997 - Zadie Smith, White Teeth, 2000 - Monica Ali, Brick Lane, 2000 - Rose Tremain, The Road Home, 2007 - Amanda Craig, Hearts and Minds, 2009 - John Lanchester, Capital, 2013 Each text will be analysed and assessed with regard to its suitability for classroom use. Excerpts from textbook units along with the accompanying tasks and media will be critically examined. Additional material from a variety of sources will be collected, presented and prepared for classroom use. Task design will be practiced by providing motivating challenges for young adult readers and learners of English. Comment: On successful completion of this module, students should - be familiar with the British Empire and the literature emerging from the post-colonial experience -know about London`s significance for contemporary multicultural life -be able to explain the role of English in post-colonial storytelling -be able to analyse narrative texts reflecting the multicultural experience -be familiar with the content and interpretation of the texts dealt with in class -be able to assess the viability of select texts for classroom use -be aware of the rules and regulations the Core Curriculum in Lower Saxony stipulates for the topic -be able to critically assess literary products for teaching purposes and, if necessary, modify and edit them - provide tasks accompanying literary texts reflecting the multicultural experience Participants are expected to: - Provide commentaries on topics discussed in class - Pass a written exam (“Klausur”) at the end of the semester
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
121 Seminars

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