Stud.IP Uni Oldenburg
University of Oldenburg
16.12.2019 10:52:56
Veranstaltungsverzeichnis

School of Linguistics and Cultural Studies Click here for PDF-Download

Winter semester 2019/2020 70 Seminars
VAK Course Number Title Type Lecture
Preliminary studies
Advanced courses
Practical course
Colloquium
Research group
Workgroup
Project group
Council conference
Internship
Language course
Subject didactics
Excursion
Tutorial
Committee
SWS Semester weekly hours Teachers Degree
3.02.029 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Thursday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 17/10/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 David Öwerdieck
  • Bachelor
3.05.551 BEYONSENSE - Artist workshop mit Kim Schoen in Kooperation mit dem Edith-Russ-Haus für Medienkunst Oldenburg Dates on Friday. 25.10.19 16:00 - 20:00, Saturday. 26.10.19 10:00 - 20:00, Friday. 15.11.19 16:00 - 20:00, Saturday. 16.11.19 10:00 - 20:00
Description:
Beyonsense Artist workshop with Kim Schoen in cooperation with the Edith Russ Haus für Medienkunst Nonsense raises philosophical problems from the first. In it, there is a confrontation between meaning and non-meaning. The absurd is also born from this conflict. The absurd is not the ridiculous, and nonsense is, of course, not no sense. Although nonsense has roots in literature and performance (the traditions of Commedia dell’arte and ‘grammelot’, Victorian nonsense poetry, as examples), and although there are involuntary confusions between meaning and non-meaning in formal thought disorders such as schizophasia (“word salads”), this seminar will focus specifically on intentional forms of nonsense within the visual art and media landscape. As a current stipend holder with the Edith Russ Haus für Medienkunst, my funded project, entitled Baragouin (named after a French term for unintelligible jargon), is a video installation that gives voice to objects: specifically, copies of sculptures, ranging in origin from Buddhist through rococo and neoclassical to modernist, found in a (now closed) commercial showroom in Los Angeles. Working with the assumption that commerce creates a lingua franca, my proposal is to mount a ‘nonsense opera’ with this cast of sculptures. I am collaborating with an art historian and voice talent who can imitate the sounds of languages from around the world, and Baragouin will present these sculptures appearing to “speak” in relation to their originals’ provenance. Our two weekend workshops together—in October and November, and an artist talk at the exhibition in April—will trace both a short history of nonsense and the working process of Baragouin. There will be slide lectures on works ranging from Zaum to dada to artists working with nonsense today; film screenings; discussions on short assigned readings; and in-class activities. Looking at the various intentions involved in the production of nonsense will lead to further questions as to its effects and affect. These intentions will be also considered within our current media environs, where politicians are currently employing the destabilizing effects of ‘non-meaning’—and this will prompt a line of questioning as to how nonsense is being put into circulation today. This seminar will challenge students with new understandings of nonsense as a practice, and provoke unconventional and creative thinking in regards to art and language. Learning objectives: Use multi-disciplinary methods of thought and inquiry. Methods of assessment: close reading and writing prompts, engaged in-class participation, activities and short presentations. Kim Schoen (b. 1969, Princeton) lives and works in Los Angeles and Berlin. She received an MFA from CalArts in 2005, and a Master of Philosophy from the photography department at The Royal College of Art in London in 2008. Her work in photography and video installation has shown at numerous institutions and galleries worldwide including MoCA, The Los Angeles Museum of Art (LAMOA), Richard Telles Fine Art, Young Projects, Moskowitz Bayse, LM Projects, and LAXART in Los Angeles; MMoCA (Madison Museum of Contemporary Art); BAM, Brooklyn, NY; The South London Gallery, Whitechapel Gallery, and MOT International in London; Museum of Contemporary Art of Rome; Museo de Arte Moderno y Contemporaneo, Spain; Archive Kabinett, Kunstverein Springhornhof, and Kleine Humboldt Galerie in Germany. Her work was recently included in LACMA’s collection, and has been written about in Art Forum, The Los Angeles Times, Mousse, and Art in America. Schoen has lectured widely at Otis College of Art & Design, Goldsmiths, CCA, The Royal College of Art, and The School of Visual Arts and has published her own writing on repetition and photography—“The Serial Attitude Redux”, “The Expansion of the Instant: Photography, Anxiety and Infinity” in X-TRA Contemporary Art Quarterly, as well as various experimental text works: Tolstoyevsky from Book Works, and E.R.O.S. Press, London. Kim is also the co-founder of and co-editor of MATERIAL, a journal of writing by contemporary artists. Beyonsense Artist workshop with Kim Schoen in cooperation with the Edith Russ Haus für Medienkunst Nonsense raises philosophical problems from the first. In it, there is a confrontation between meaning and non-meaning. The absurd is also born from this conflict. The absurd is not the ridiculous, and nonsense is, of course, not no sense. Although nonsense has roots in literature and performance (the traditions of Commedia dell’arte and ‘grammelot’, Victorian nonsense poetry, as examples), and although there are involuntary confusions between meaning and non-meaning in formal thought disorders such as schizophasia (“word salads”), this seminar will focus specifically on intentional forms of nonsense within the visual art and media landscape. As a current stipend holder with the Edith Russ Haus für Medienkunst, my funded project, entitled Baragouin (named after a French term for unintelligible jargon), is a video installation that gives voice to objects: specifically, copies of sculptures, ranging in origin from Buddhist through rococo and neoclassical to modernist, found in a (now closed) commercial showroom in Los Angeles. Working with the assumption that commerce creates a lingua franca, my proposal is to mount a ‘nonsense opera’ with this cast of sculptures. I am collaborating with an art historian and voice talent who can imitate the sounds of languages from around the world, and Baragouin will present these sculptures appearing to “speak” in relation to their originals’ provenance. Our two weekend workshops together—in October and November, and an artist talk at the exhibition in April—will trace both a short history of nonsense and the working process of Baragouin. There will be slide lectures on works ranging from Zaum to dada to artists working with nonsense today; film screenings; discussions on short assigned readings; and in-class activities. Looking at the various intentions involved in the production of nonsense will lead to further questions as to its effects and affect. These intentions will be also considered within our current media environs, where politicians are currently employing the destabilizing effects of ‘non-meaning’—and this will prompt a line of questioning as to how nonsense is being put into circulation today. This seminar will challenge students with new understandings of nonsense as a practice, and provoke unconventional and creative thinking in regards to art and language. Learning objectives: Use multi-disciplinary methods of thought and inquiry. Methods of assessment: close reading and writing prompts, engaged in-class participation, activities and short presentations. Kim Schoen (b. 1969, Princeton) lives and works in Los Angeles and Berlin. She received an MFA from CalArts in 2005, and a Master of Philosophy from the photography department at The Royal College of Art in London in 2008. Her work in photography and video installation has shown at numerous institutions and galleries worldwide including MoCA, The Los Angeles Museum of Art (LAMOA), Richard Telles Fine Art, Young Projects, Moskowitz Bayse, LM Projects, and LAXART in Los Angeles; MMoCA (Madison Museum of Contemporary Art); BAM, Brooklyn, NY; The South London Gallery, Whitechapel Gallery, and MOT International in London; Museum of Contemporary Art of Rome; Museo de Arte Moderno y Contemporaneo, Spain; Archive Kabinett, Kunstverein Springhornhof, and Kleine Humboldt Galerie in Germany. Her work was recently included in LACMA’s collection, and has been written about in Art Forum, The Los Angeles Times, Mousse, and Art in America. Schoen has lectured widely at Otis College of Art & Design, Goldsmiths, CCA, The Royal College of Art, and The School of Visual Arts and has published her own writing on repetition and photography—“The Serial Attitude Redux”, “The Expansion of the Instant: Photography, Anxiety and Infinity” in X-TRA Contemporary Art Quarterly, as well as various experimental text works: Tolstoyevsky from Book Works, and E.R.O.S. Press, London. Kim is also the co-founder of and co-editor of MATERIAL, a journal of writing by contemporary artists.
Seminar - Kimberly Schoen
  • Master
  • Master of Education
3.90.120 EMMIR MM12 Thursday: 08:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 17/10/19)
Dates on Thursday. 10.10.19 08:00 - 12:00, Thursday. 05.12.19 09:00 - 18:00

Description:
Seminar - Dr. phil. Lüder Tietz, M.A.
Dr. Lydia Potts
Dr. rer. pol. Mahmut Murat Ardag
Dr. rer. pol. Berna Öney
  • Master
3.90.124 EMMIR mir120 Research Teams E/F Dates on Wednesday. 02.10.19, Thursday. 10.10.19, Thursday. 17.10.19, Thursday. 07.11.19, Thursday. 14.11.19, Thursday. 21.11.19, Thursday. 28.11.19 14:00 - 16:00
Description:
Exercises - Dr. phil. Lüder Tietz, M.A.
  • Master
3.90.146 EMMIR LS Workshop 7 Women and Migration in contemporary South Asia The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Workshop - Gast Dozent
  • Master
3.02.045 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 17/10/19)

Description:
Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses
Exercises 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.02.049 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 18/10/19), Location: A14 0-030, V03 0-C003

Description:
Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses
Exercises 2 Alena Cicholewski
  • Bachelor
3.02.050 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 17/10/19)

Description:
Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses
Exercises 2 Michal Musialowski
  • Bachelor
20.01.320 English for University Studies- 4-Writing/Speaking Thursday: 12:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 17/10/19)

Description:
Language course 4 Wenny Susanto-Berky
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.90.125 EMMIR WS A Gentle Introduction to Quantitative Methods Application Dates on Wednesday. 04.12.19 09:00 - 17:00
Description:
Workshop - Dr. rer. pol. Mahmut Murat Ardag
Dr. rer. pol. Berna Öney
  • Master
3.02.999 Creative Writing Wednesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 16/10/19)

Description:
The aim of this workshop-style writing group is to get together and share your own work with the group for feedback and discussion. It is a great opportunity for both experienced and novice writers to expand their repertoire, learn new things and experience other people's interpretations and poetry first-hand. Whether you already have a large collection to share, or you've never written a word in your life - people of all levels of skill are welcome to join us. The intended focus of this course is poetic writing, topics for the sessions will be decided among the course participants. The aim of this workshop-style writing group is to get together and share your own work with the group for feedback and discussion. It is a great opportunity for both experienced and novice writers to expand their repertoire, learn new things and experience other people's interpretations and poetry first-hand. Whether you already have a large collection to share, or you've never written a word in your life - people of all levels of skill are welcome to join us. The intended focus of this course is poetic writing, topics for the sessions will be decided among the course participants.
Miscellaneous 2 Jascha Kattmann
  • Bachelor
3.02.048 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 18/10/19)

Description:
Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses
Exercises 2 Alena Cicholewski
  • Bachelor
3.02.140 S The English Sonnet Thursday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 17/10/19)
Dates on Thursday. 14.11.19 18:00 - 20:30

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Galena Hashhozheva
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.072 (j) Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 17/10/19)
Dates on Tuesday. 11.02.20 09:00 - 11:00

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.90.115 Navigating EMMIR The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Miscellaneous - Dr. Lydia Potts
Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
Dr. rer. pol. Mahmut Murat Ardag
Andreas Tilch
Daniela Arias Vargas
Michal Musialowski
  • Master
3.02.020 VL Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 15/10/19), Location: A11 1-101 (Hörsaal B)
Dates on Saturday. 08.02.20 10:00 - 12:00, Room: A14 1-102 (Hörsaal 2), A14 1-101 (Hörsaal 1)

Description:
Lecture 2 Prof. Dr. Cornelia Hamann
  • Bachelor
20.01.314 English for University Studies-3-Comprehensive Language Skills B Monday: 12:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 14/10/19)

Description:
Language course 4 Geraldine Barry
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.040 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 17/10/19)

Description:
Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses
Exercises 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Bachelor
3.02.027 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Friday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 18/10/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lina Abed Ibrahim, M.A.
  • Bachelor
3.02.151 S Writing the Nation: 19th-Century U.S. American Fiction Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 16/10/19)

Description:
From the 1820s and throughout the nineteenth century, the young US-American nation showed a growing cultural and national swagger, not least in its expanding literary activities. In their literary output Americans, on the one hand, looked back to their own recent history – its two successful revolutionary wars in particular – and, on the other, attempted to come to terms with the social, demographic, political, and economic changes of the nineteenth century. Indeed, with the transportation, industrial, and technological revolutions, the nineteenth century kept Americans in motion – physically and figuratively, domestically and internationally. Furthermore, the westward expansion and the escalating sectional conflicts about slavery divided the country, and Americans were required to adapt to swiftly changing circumstances in their daily lives. This course traces the young nation’s literary and cultural aspirations in an age of expansion and upheaval, by combining fresh interpretations with literary history. The aim is to acquire an understanding of nineteenth-century literary periods, genres, and relevant contexts. Please purchase and read the following novels (no specific edition is required for the reading materials): Catherine Maria Sedgwick, Hope Leslie, Or, Early Times in the Massachusetts (1827); Martin Delaney, Blake; Or, The Huts of America (1859-1862); Frederick Douglass, “The Heroic Slave” (1852); and Stephen Crane, The Red Badge of Courage (1895). The syllabus and additional reading materials will be available on Stud.IP. From the 1820s and throughout the nineteenth century, the young US-American nation showed a growing cultural and national swagger, not least in its expanding literary activities. In their literary output Americans, on the one hand, looked back to their own recent history – its two successful revolutionary wars in particular – and, on the other, attempted to come to terms with the social, demographic, political, and economic changes of the nineteenth century. Indeed, with the transportation, industrial, and technological revolutions, the nineteenth century kept Americans in motion – physically and figuratively, domestically and internationally. Furthermore, the westward expansion and the escalating sectional conflicts about slavery divided the country, and Americans were required to adapt to swiftly changing circumstances in their daily lives. This course traces the young nation’s literary and cultural aspirations in an age of expansion and upheaval, by combining fresh interpretations with literary history. The aim is to acquire an understanding of nineteenth-century literary periods, genres, and relevant contexts. Please purchase and read the following novels (no specific edition is required for the reading materials): Catherine Maria Sedgwick, Hope Leslie, Or, Early Times in the Massachusetts (1827); Martin Delaney, Blake; Or, The Huts of America (1859-1862); Frederick Douglass, “The Heroic Slave” (1852); and Stephen Crane, The Red Badge of Courage (1895). The syllabus and additional reading materials will be available on Stud.IP.
Seminar 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.90.410 EMMIR Cohort 8 Proposal Colloquium The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Colloquium - Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
Dr. Lydia Potts
Dr. phil. Lüder Tietz, M.A.
Dr. rer. pol. Berna Öney
  • Master
3.02.120 S E.M. Forster - Aspects of the Novelist Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 15/10/19)

Description:
Forster's continuing popularity as a writer can be attributed to many aspects of his work: first of all, his novels always are a good and pleasurable read - subtle, ironic and highly entertaining. Secondly, the opulent film adaptations of his texts, however nostalgic, have introduced his works to a present-day audience and thus inspired ongoing debates about our modernist heritage. Lastly and most significantly for our purposes, however, his novels display a wide range of topics, from class and social change (in %%Howards End%%), to colonialism, imperialism and orientalism (in %%A Passage to India%%), and on to gender and sexuality (in %%Maurice%%). Therefore, Forster's texts present themselves as the perfect vehicle for discussions that aim to trace the origins of many of today's social debates and to engage in a historical dialogue between the present and the past. Please buy and read: Forster, E.M. %%Howards End%%. 1910. London: Penguin, 2000. Forster, E.M. %%Maurice%%. 1971. London: Penguin, 2005. Forster, E.M. %%A Passage to India%%. 1924. London: Penguin, 2005 Forster, E.M. %%A Room with a View%%. 1908. London: Penguin, 2000. Please buy and watch: %%Howards End%%. 1992. Dir. James Ivory. Perf. Emma Thompson, Helena Bonham Carter, Vanessa Redgrave, and Anthony Hopkins. Arthaus, 2010. DVD. Forster's continuing popularity as a writer can be attributed to many aspects of his work: first of all, his novels always are a good and pleasurable read - subtle, ironic and highly entertaining. Secondly, the opulent film adaptations of his texts, however nostalgic, have introduced his works to a present-day audience and thus inspired ongoing debates about our modernist heritage. Lastly and most significantly for our purposes, however, his novels display a wide range of topics, from class and social change (in %%Howards End%%), to colonialism, imperialism and orientalism (in %%A Passage to India%%), and on to gender and sexuality (in %%Maurice%%). Therefore, Forster's texts present themselves as the perfect vehicle for discussions that aim to trace the origins of many of today's social debates and to engage in a historical dialogue between the present and the past. Please buy and read: Forster, E.M. %%Howards End%%. 1910. London: Penguin, 2000. Forster, E.M. %%Maurice%%. 1971. London: Penguin, 2005. Forster, E.M. %%A Passage to India%%. 1924. London: Penguin, 2005 Forster, E.M. %%A Room with a View%%. 1908. London: Penguin, 2000. Please buy and watch: %%Howards End%%. 1992. Dir. James Ivory. Perf. Emma Thompson, Helena Bonham Carter, Vanessa Redgrave, and Anthony Hopkins. Arthaus, 2010. DVD.
Seminar 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
20.01.311 Englisch Basismodul 1 A Monday: 12:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 14/10/19)

Description:
Language course 4 Richard Dawton
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.077 (k) Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 17/10/19)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
3.02.221 S Screening Europe: Representations of Europe in US-American Film and TV Dates on Friday. 08.11.19 16:00 - 18:00, Saturday. 30.11.19 10:00 - 17:00, Thursday. 12.12.19 18:00 - 20:00, Saturday. 25.01.20 - Sunday. 26.01.20 10:00 - 17:00, Room: A01 0-006, A09 0-004 (Studio E), (A06 2-212)
Description:
“I may not know much but I do know that Europeans love Americans.” This is what Peter Parker’s sidekick Ned tells him as they set off on their school trip to Europe in the new "Spider-Man: Far from Home" movie (2019). This is just one example of a common trope in US-American film: the trip to Europe. Some US-American TV series also dedicate special “vacation episodes” to certain cities in Europe (e.g. "Friends," "Parks and Recreation," or "How I Met Your Mother"). In each of these cases, a certain notion of Europe, European cities, and Europeans is constructed. These notions often times include stereotypes, myths, and romantic ideas, e.g., sexual freedom, cheap alcohol, and old castles. No matter how different the films and TV series are, each of these representations reproduces but also constructs an idea of Europe, certain parts of Europe, and the people who live there. In the seminar, we will have a look at different representations of Europe in film and TV. With a representation-critical approach and the methodological toolkit of film analysis, global perspectives of Europe or parts of Europe and what it means to be European will be examined and analyzed. Guiding questions will be inter alia: - How is Europe represented? - Which filmic devices are employed to construct or support a certain notion of Europe? - What is represented/suggested/identified as (stereo)typical European? - Which voices are heard, which are not? What is made visible and what remains invisible? The course is primarily geared towards international exchange students participating in the "European Studies in Global Perspectives" program, but it is also open to University of Oldenburg students. “I may not know much but I do know that Europeans love Americans.” This is what Peter Parker’s sidekick Ned tells him as they set off on their school trip to Europe in the new "Spider-Man: Far from Home" movie (2019). This is just one example of a common trope in US-American film: the trip to Europe. Some US-American TV series also dedicate special “vacation episodes” to certain cities in Europe (e.g. "Friends," "Parks and Recreation," or "How I Met Your Mother"). In each of these cases, a certain notion of Europe, European cities, and Europeans is constructed. These notions often times include stereotypes, myths, and romantic ideas, e.g., sexual freedom, cheap alcohol, and old castles. No matter how different the films and TV series are, each of these representations reproduces but also constructs an idea of Europe, certain parts of Europe, and the people who live there. In the seminar, we will have a look at different representations of Europe in film and TV. With a representation-critical approach and the methodological toolkit of film analysis, global perspectives of Europe or parts of Europe and what it means to be European will be examined and analyzed. Guiding questions will be inter alia: - How is Europe represented? - Which filmic devices are employed to construct or support a certain notion of Europe? - What is represented/suggested/identified as (stereo)typical European? - Which voices are heard, which are not? What is made visible and what remains invisible? The course is primarily geared towards international exchange students participating in the "European Studies in Global Perspectives" program, but it is also open to University of Oldenburg students.
Seminar - Lea Brenningmeyer
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.90.140 EMMIR LS Workshop 1 Participant Observation The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Workshop - Anna Schwenck
  • Master
3.90.320 EMMIR Focus Module "Migration Research - Theories and Methods in Migration Studies" (Semester 3) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - Dr. Lydia Potts
  • Master
3.02.304 KO New Research in American Literary and Cultural Studies Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 15/10/19)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
  • Bachelor
  • Master
  • Master of Education
20.01.318 English for University Studies -5- Comprehensive Language Practice Thursday: 08:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 17/10/19)

Description:
Language course 4 Richard Dawton
  • Bachelor
3.02.078 (i) Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 17/10/19)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
3.02.175 VL Methods in Language Use, Variation and Change Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 17/10/19)

Description:
The lecture “Methods in Language Variation and Change” accompanies one of the linguistic seminars in ang617/ang618 and is meant for students registered for these courses to develop basic methodological skills in the topic areas of language variation and change. Unlike many other disciplines in the humanities, linguistics has a very empirical research tradition. To get the data needed for empirical research, there are various methods of data collection which all come with a number of limitations and advantages. In this course, we will introduce and evaluate different methods of data collection, making you familiar with the advantages and disadvantages of them all and discuss critically the suitability for your research questions. In the lecture, we will guide students to develop different methodological skills and competences, such as: - the ability to formulate a valid (and manageable) research question - the ability to choose the appropriate approach to answering this research question (i.e. e.g. qualitative vs. quantitative research) - the ability to choose the appropriate method(s) of data collection to answer this question - the ability to choose the appropriate participants/ language corpus to answer this question - the ability to analyse the data - the ability to choose and present relevant results - the ability to structure linguistic papers - etc. The course is meant to give you a hands-on experience in working empirically yourself – from developing a research question to analysing and presenting your data. Therefore, the teaching methods in this course will vary from regular lectures in the first part to (individual) counselling and consultation about your own projects (be it posters, term papers or other kinds of examination). Students who registered for one of the linguistic seminars in ang617 also need to register for this lecture. The lecture “Methods in Language Variation and Change” accompanies one of the linguistic seminars in ang617/ang618 and is meant for students registered for these courses to develop basic methodological skills in the topic areas of language variation and change. Unlike many other disciplines in the humanities, linguistics has a very empirical research tradition. To get the data needed for empirical research, there are various methods of data collection which all come with a number of limitations and advantages. In this course, we will introduce and evaluate different methods of data collection, making you familiar with the advantages and disadvantages of them all and discuss critically the suitability for your research questions. In the lecture, we will guide students to develop different methodological skills and competences, such as: - the ability to formulate a valid (and manageable) research question - the ability to choose the appropriate approach to answering this research question (i.e. e.g. qualitative vs. quantitative research) - the ability to choose the appropriate method(s) of data collection to answer this question - the ability to choose the appropriate participants/ language corpus to answer this question - the ability to analyse the data - the ability to choose and present relevant results - the ability to structure linguistic papers - etc. The course is meant to give you a hands-on experience in working empirically yourself – from developing a research question to analysing and presenting your data. Therefore, the teaching methods in this course will vary from regular lectures in the first part to (individual) counselling and consultation about your own projects (be it posters, term papers or other kinds of examination). Students who registered for one of the linguistic seminars in ang617 also need to register for this lecture.
Lecture 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.970 S Gender Performances: Paranoid and Reparative Uses of Drag Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 16/10/19)

Description:
In Queer and Gender Studies as well as in everyday life, the uses of drag are manifold. Consequently, it may be an unnecessarily limiting perspective to view gender performativity solely as a deconstructivist tool in a struggle against the regulatory regime of heteronormativity. In fact, even though it undoubtedly marks such a tool, and by all means a powerful one, some more uplifting and reparative purposes of drag tend at times to be overlooked, as they may manifest themselves on a personal rather than a political scale. Exploring the full scale of drag acts, this seminar will take a look at literary and cinematic representations of drag from the late 1960s, the historical moment that witnesses the decriminalisation of homosexuality through the passing of the Sexual Offences Act 1967, up until today. In order to trace this historical development, the structure of the seminar will include a subdivision into two parts. In the first part, we will discuss four selected texts from different decades, namely: Quentin Crisp's autobiography %%The Naked Civil Servant%% (1968), Joe Orton's play %%What the Butler Saw%% (1969), Harvey Fierstein's %%Torch Song Trilogy%% (1982), and finally, Stephan Elliott's film %%The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert%% (1994). In the second part, you may choose the primary material of the seminar from a number of selected contemporary texts – e.g. Jackie Kay %%Trumpet%% (1998), Sarah Waters' %%Tipping the Velvet%% (1998), Patrick McCabe's %%Breakfast on Pluto%% (1998), Todd Haynes' %%Velvet Goldmine%% (1998), Kimberly Peirce's %%Boys Don't Cry%% (1999), Stephen Daldry's %%Billy Eliot%% (2000), John Cameron Mitchell's %%Hedwig and the Angry Inch%% (2001), Mark Ravenhill's %%Mother Clap's Molly House%% (2001), Jeffrey Eugenides' %%Middlesex%% (2002), Doug Wright's %%I am My Own Wife%% (2003), Leslie Feinberg's %%Stone Butch Blues%% (2003), Neil Jordan's %%Breakfast on Pluto%% (2005), Duncan Tucker's %%Transamerica%% (2005), John Waters' vs. Adam Shankman's %%Hairspray%% (1988/2007), Amazon's %%Transparent%% (2014 - ), Ali Smith's %%How to Be Both%% (2014), Tom Hooper's %%The Danish Girl%% (2015), Sebastian Barry's %%Days Without End%% (2016), Jeanette Winterson's %%Frankissstein%% (2019), etc. – and thus, carry your own research interests into the seminar. Note bene: This format requires that you are prepared to sign up for a (group) presentation of your chosen material. Please read/ watch the following texts: Quentin Crisp. %%The Naked Civil Servant%%. London: Penguin, 1997. Joe Orton. %%What the Butler Saw%%. London: A & C Black, 1969. Harvey Fierstein. %%Torch Song Trilogy%%. New York: Ballantine, 2018. %%The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert%%. Dir. Stephan Elliott. Perf. Hugo Weaving, Terence Stamp, and Guy Pierce. MGM Home Entertainment, 2009. In Queer and Gender Studies as well as in everyday life, the uses of drag are manifold. Consequently, it may be an unnecessarily limiting perspective to view gender performativity solely as a deconstructivist tool in a struggle against the regulatory regime of heteronormativity. In fact, even though it undoubtedly marks such a tool, and by all means a powerful one, some more uplifting and reparative purposes of drag tend at times to be overlooked, as they may manifest themselves on a personal rather than a political scale. Exploring the full scale of drag acts, this seminar will take a look at literary and cinematic representations of drag from the late 1960s, the historical moment that witnesses the decriminalisation of homosexuality through the passing of the Sexual Offences Act 1967, up until today. In order to trace this historical development, the structure of the seminar will include a subdivision into two parts. In the first part, we will discuss four selected texts from different decades, namely: Quentin Crisp's autobiography %%The Naked Civil Servant%% (1968), Joe Orton's play %%What the Butler Saw%% (1969), Harvey Fierstein's %%Torch Song Trilogy%% (1982), and finally, Stephan Elliott's film %%The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert%% (1994). In the second part, you may choose the primary material of the seminar from a number of selected contemporary texts – e.g. Jackie Kay %%Trumpet%% (1998), Sarah Waters' %%Tipping the Velvet%% (1998), Patrick McCabe's %%Breakfast on Pluto%% (1998), Todd Haynes' %%Velvet Goldmine%% (1998), Kimberly Peirce's %%Boys Don't Cry%% (1999), Stephen Daldry's %%Billy Eliot%% (2000), John Cameron Mitchell's %%Hedwig and the Angry Inch%% (2001), Mark Ravenhill's %%Mother Clap's Molly House%% (2001), Jeffrey Eugenides' %%Middlesex%% (2002), Doug Wright's %%I am My Own Wife%% (2003), Leslie Feinberg's %%Stone Butch Blues%% (2003), Neil Jordan's %%Breakfast on Pluto%% (2005), Duncan Tucker's %%Transamerica%% (2005), John Waters' vs. Adam Shankman's %%Hairspray%% (1988/2007), Amazon's %%Transparent%% (2014 - ), Ali Smith's %%How to Be Both%% (2014), Tom Hooper's %%The Danish Girl%% (2015), Sebastian Barry's %%Days Without End%% (2016), Jeanette Winterson's %%Frankissstein%% (2019), etc. – and thus, carry your own research interests into the seminar. Note bene: This format requires that you are prepared to sign up for a (group) presentation of your chosen material. Please read/ watch the following texts: Quentin Crisp. %%The Naked Civil Servant%%. London: Penguin, 1997. Joe Orton. %%What the Butler Saw%%. London: A & C Black, 1969. Harvey Fierstein. %%Torch Song Trilogy%%. New York: Ballantine, 2018. %%The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert%%. Dir. Stephan Elliott. Perf. Hugo Weaving, Terence Stamp, and Guy Pierce. MGM Home Entertainment, 2009.
Seminar 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Master
  • Master of Education
3.90.127 EMMIR WS Policy Analysis Dates on Friday. 01.11.19 10:00 - 16:00
Description:
Workshop - Dr. rer. pol. Berna Öney
  • Master
20.01.321 English Success at Work -5- Application Skills Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 15/10/19)

Description:
The Success in Business Course is composed of 3 business courses (Application Skills; Communication Skills; Grammar and Vocabulary Skills). http://www.uni-oldenburg.de/fk3/sprachenzentrum/sprachen/englisch/kursangebot/success-in-business/ The Success in Business Course is composed of 3 business courses (Application Skills; Communication Skills; Grammar and Vocabulary Skills). http://www.uni-oldenburg.de/fk3/sprachenzentrum/sprachen/englisch/kursangebot/success-in-business/
Language course 2 Richard Dawton
  • Bachelor
3.90.133 EMMIR Study trip + WS Gender & Genocide Dates on Thursday. 17.10.19 16:00 - 19:00, Monday. 28.10.19 14:00 - 20:00
Description:
Outline Since the second half of the 20th century, the term ‘genocide’, coined by Raphael Lemkin in the 1940s, has become central in international discourses and conventions as well as in research on mass killings and atrocities. The systematic murder of European Jews during the National Socialist Regime is considered the key case of genocide initiated and executed by a modern state’s bureaucratic apparatus backed by the majority of ‘ordinary’ men and women. The study trip provides an introduction to Nazi genocidal politics, its implementation and consequences in and beyond Germany. Starting right after the seizure of power (‘Machtergreifung’) in 1933 the ideal of a German ‘Arian community’ constituted the basis of many forms of societal exclusion and persecution with often lethal consequences for individuals and groups – Germans as well as people of different national and ethnic origin. Hundreds of concentration camps were core sites of the Nazi regime’s strategy for intimidating, punishing, segregating and eliminating those who deviated from the political and societal order and norms of the imagined racialized community. Both, the detention in concentration camps (where death was omnipresent) and the systematic killing in specialized extermination camps resulting in the Holocaust, were interwoven with forms of forced migration and labour. Moreover, the forced labour of East European civilians shoud also be read as an aspect of the genocidal strategies for creating space for German settlements in Poland and the Soviet Union. During WW II millions of civilians, men, women and children were forced to work for the German wartime economy, encompassing all kinds of private, state, municipal or church fields of works. Their working and living conditions differed according to the implemented racial order, but were also framed by wartime politics and the everyday attitudes and actions of Germans in different political and social positions. The majority of forced labourers lived in camps in order to control them and manifest their exclusion from the desirable German population. Many Germans and German companies profited from the system of forced labour taking action to keep the system of exploitation, deprivation and humiliation running. The Nazi past is not just an important historical case of extreme violence; it is also a crucial reference point not only in German and European but also in global memory discourses. Given the fact that atrocities committed before and after the Holocaust have caused further legacies of traumatic experiences and play a crucial role for individuals and groups on national and international scales, it is also essential to discuss how remembrance in the public sphere can address the multitude of perspectives without creating hierarchical memory politics. Recent research scrutinises the effects of globalised Holocaust memory cultures, obligations of remembering and forgetting extreme cases of violence. In the German context, this concerns questions on the marginalisation of remembering genocides committed during colonial times. The Herero and Nama(qua) genocide committed by the German colonial army (1904-1908) in then German South West Africa (now Namibia) has been categorized as the first genocide of the 20th century. Only recently, over a hundred years after the massacre, the German government officially acknowledged the atrocities as genocide. In line with but also beyond the need to decolonise social practices of remembering the European history of extreme violence, it is also crucial to bear in mind that genocide has still been a serious issue in the recent history of different world regions. Despite the adoption of the “Convention on the Prevention and Punishment” of the Crime of Genocide by the UN (1948) and its ratification by many states, geopolitical interests and power constellations influence (inter)national campaigns of awareness raising as well as (inter)national politics of intervention and remembering. In this vein, the genocide in Bangladesh during the liberation war in 1971 will be a further reference point for our reflections on memory politics and knowledge production. This genocide in is one of the nearly forgotten genocides, which even “[w]ithin comparative genocide studies the Bangladesh genocide remains strikingly little known” as the genocide scholar Adam Jones stated. He argues “[t]his reflects the peripheral position of East Pakistan/Bangladesh in the global order – something that also accounts for the lack of international interest and intervention at the time.” Two students from Bangladesh will attend our study trip and introduce us to the history of this genocide and the past and presence of remembrance. Three genocides, the Holocaust, the Herero and Nama(qua) genocide as well as the Bangladesh genocide will serve as case studies to discuss the linkages between power, knowledge production and memory politics. Central to the discussion will be the impact of gender in politics and practices of exclusion in terms of perpetrators, victims and beneficiaries, if such sharply delineated categories are at all applicable. This should include a close scrutiny of gender dimensions of memory (politics). We will visit in particular: • House of the Wannsee Conference, https://www.ghwk.de/en The representative villa in the affluent and respectable neighbourhood at the lake Wannsee on the outskirts of Berlin was used as an SS guesthouse from 1941 to 1945. In 1942, representatives of the SS, the Nazi party and the state met there to discuss their cooperation in the deportation and murder of the European Jews. We will visit the exhibition and have a seminar on the ‘Final Solution’. • Postcolonial Berlin, http://www.berlin-postkolonial.de (in German) The organisation addresses German and European colonialism and its aftermath up to the present. Like other organisations in German cities, their work includes initiatives for remembrance integrating the views of descendants of the colonized and the racialized people in Germany and Europe. We will have a guided tour with a member of the non-governmental organisation focussing on the genocide in German South West Africa. • Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, http://www.stiftung-denkmal.de/en/home.html This national memorial, located in the centre of the capital, was opened in 2006. The erection and design of the memorial was controversially discussed in public and finally approved by the German parliament. The part of the memorial on ground level “the Field of Stelae”, designed by the internationally renowned US-American architect Peter Eisenstein, can be accessed and walked through from all directions. The subterranean information centre provides a permanent exhibition, which documents the persecution and murder of the European Jews. We will visit the two components of the memorial and discuss our impressions and points of view with a guide of the memorial. • Sachsenhausen Memorial and Museum, http://www.stiftung-bg.de/gums/en/index.htm The concentration camp Sachsenhausen, located on the outskirts of the town of Oranienburg near the capital Berlin, operated as role model and education centre for the SS. From 1936 to 1945 more than 200,000 men were incarcerated, first mostly political opponents, then increasingly men from Germany and the occupied countries, who were accused of various transgressions of the social and racial order and/or because they embodied the undesirable population for creating an “Arian society”. The memorial site provides information about the terror system and is perpetrators, the life and death of prisoners in this camp and in the earlier concentration camp for around 3000 male political opponents, which was located in the heart of Oranienburg from March 1933 to July 1934. The subsequent use of the camp Sachsenhausen by the Soviet secret service (1945-1950) is addressed by the memorial site as is the history of commemoration, particularly in the GDR (1950-1990). The visit will be a combination of a tour of the memorial site and a seminar. • The Nazi Forced Labour Documentation Centre, http://www.dz-ns-zwangsarbeit.de/en The documentation centre is a relatively new memorial site, established in 2006 on the historical site of a Berlin camp for forced labourers during the Nazi time. The centre serves to raise awareness for the forced labour of civilians from different European countries. This aspect of the Nazi time, for decades marginalised in official and public memory, became a prominent topic during the (inter)national public debate of the compensation of forced labourers in the late 1990s. A guided tour will provide an overview about forced labour during the Nazi time, its aftermath, particularly the fate of those who were repatriated to the Soviet Union. Students are expected to prepare the study trip through extensive reading. Notes, visual and audio files should be taken during the study trip. The study trip will close with a workshop in Oldenburg (on October 29) to provide space for articulating different perspectives on the topics. Students are also invited to write (photo) essays, poems etc. that can be published in journals or on websites. Costs EMMIR will cover all of the expenses connected to the educational parts of the study trip; you will have to contribute 80 Euro (for accommodation and local travel) and self-fund your travel to and from Berlin. Outline Since the second half of the 20th century, the term ‘genocide’, coined by Raphael Lemkin in the 1940s, has become central in international discourses and conventions as well as in research on mass killings and atrocities. The systematic murder of European Jews during the National Socialist Regime is considered the key case of genocide initiated and executed by a modern state’s bureaucratic apparatus backed by the majority of ‘ordinary’ men and women. The study trip provides an introduction to Nazi genocidal politics, its implementation and consequences in and beyond Germany. Starting right after the seizure of power (‘Machtergreifung’) in 1933 the ideal of a German ‘Arian community’ constituted the basis of many forms of societal exclusion and persecution with often lethal consequences for individuals and groups – Germans as well as people of different national and ethnic origin. Hundreds of concentration camps were core sites of the Nazi regime’s strategy for intimidating, punishing, segregating and eliminating those who deviated from the political and societal order and norms of the imagined racialized community. Both, the detention in concentration camps (where death was omnipresent) and the systematic killing in specialized extermination camps resulting in the Holocaust, were interwoven with forms of forced migration and labour. Moreover, the forced labour of East European civilians shoud also be read as an aspect of the genocidal strategies for creating space for German settlements in Poland and the Soviet Union. During WW II millions of civilians, men, women and children were forced to work for the German wartime economy, encompassing all kinds of private, state, municipal or church fields of works. Their working and living conditions differed according to the implemented racial order, but were also framed by wartime politics and the everyday attitudes and actions of Germans in different political and social positions. The majority of forced labourers lived in camps in order to control them and manifest their exclusion from the desirable German population. Many Germans and German companies profited from the system of forced labour taking action to keep the system of exploitation, deprivation and humiliation running. The Nazi past is not just an important historical case of extreme violence; it is also a crucial reference point not only in German and European but also in global memory discourses. Given the fact that atrocities committed before and after the Holocaust have caused further legacies of traumatic experiences and play a crucial role for individuals and groups on national and international scales, it is also essential to discuss how remembrance in the public sphere can address the multitude of perspectives without creating hierarchical memory politics. Recent research scrutinises the effects of globalised Holocaust memory cultures, obligations of remembering and forgetting extreme cases of violence. In the German context, this concerns questions on the marginalisation of remembering genocides committed during colonial times. The Herero and Nama(qua) genocide committed by the German colonial army (1904-1908) in then German South West Africa (now Namibia) has been categorized as the first genocide of the 20th century. Only recently, over a hundred years after the massacre, the German government officially acknowledged the atrocities as genocide. In line with but also beyond the need to decolonise social practices of remembering the European history of extreme violence, it is also crucial to bear in mind that genocide has still been a serious issue in the recent history of different world regions. Despite the adoption of the “Convention on the Prevention and Punishment” of the Crime of Genocide by the UN (1948) and its ratification by many states, geopolitical interests and power constellations influence (inter)national campaigns of awareness raising as well as (inter)national politics of intervention and remembering. In this vein, the genocide in Bangladesh during the liberation war in 1971 will be a further reference point for our reflections on memory politics and knowledge production. This genocide in is one of the nearly forgotten genocides, which even “[w]ithin comparative genocide studies the Bangladesh genocide remains strikingly little known” as the genocide scholar Adam Jones stated. He argues “[t]his reflects the peripheral position of East Pakistan/Bangladesh in the global order – something that also accounts for the lack of international interest and intervention at the time.” Two students from Bangladesh will attend our study trip and introduce us to the history of this genocide and the past and presence of remembrance. Three genocides, the Holocaust, the Herero and Nama(qua) genocide as well as the Bangladesh genocide will serve as case studies to discuss the linkages between power, knowledge production and memory politics. Central to the discussion will be the impact of gender in politics and practices of exclusion in terms of perpetrators, victims and beneficiaries, if such sharply delineated categories are at all applicable. This should include a close scrutiny of gender dimensions of memory (politics). We will visit in particular: • House of the Wannsee Conference, https://www.ghwk.de/en The representative villa in the affluent and respectable neighbourhood at the lake Wannsee on the outskirts of Berlin was used as an SS guesthouse from 1941 to 1945. In 1942, representatives of the SS, the Nazi party and the state met there to discuss their cooperation in the deportation and murder of the European Jews. We will visit the exhibition and have a seminar on the ‘Final Solution’. • Postcolonial Berlin, http://www.berlin-postkolonial.de (in German) The organisation addresses German and European colonialism and its aftermath up to the present. Like other organisations in German cities, their work includes initiatives for remembrance integrating the views of descendants of the colonized and the racialized people in Germany and Europe. We will have a guided tour with a member of the non-governmental organisation focussing on the genocide in German South West Africa. • Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, http://www.stiftung-denkmal.de/en/home.html This national memorial, located in the centre of the capital, was opened in 2006. The erection and design of the memorial was controversially discussed in public and finally approved by the German parliament. The part of the memorial on ground level “the Field of Stelae”, designed by the internationally renowned US-American architect Peter Eisenstein, can be accessed and walked through from all directions. The subterranean information centre provides a permanent exhibition, which documents the persecution and murder of the European Jews. We will visit the two components of the memorial and discuss our impressions and points of view with a guide of the memorial. • Sachsenhausen Memorial and Museum, http://www.stiftung-bg.de/gums/en/index.htm The concentration camp Sachsenhausen, located on the outskirts of the town of Oranienburg near the capital Berlin, operated as role model and education centre for the SS. From 1936 to 1945 more than 200,000 men were incarcerated, first mostly political opponents, then increasingly men from Germany and the occupied countries, who were accused of various transgressions of the social and racial order and/or because they embodied the undesirable population for creating an “Arian society”. The memorial site provides information about the terror system and is perpetrators, the life and death of prisoners in this camp and in the earlier concentration camp for around 3000 male political opponents, which was located in the heart of Oranienburg from March 1933 to July 1934. The subsequent use of the camp Sachsenhausen by the Soviet secret service (1945-1950) is addressed by the memorial site as is the history of commemoration, particularly in the GDR (1950-1990). The visit will be a combination of a tour of the memorial site and a seminar. • The Nazi Forced Labour Documentation Centre, http://www.dz-ns-zwangsarbeit.de/en The documentation centre is a relatively new memorial site, established in 2006 on the historical site of a Berlin camp for forced labourers during the Nazi time. The centre serves to raise awareness for the forced labour of civilians from different European countries. This aspect of the Nazi time, for decades marginalised in official and public memory, became a prominent topic during the (inter)national public debate of the compensation of forced labourers in the late 1990s. A guided tour will provide an overview about forced labour during the Nazi time, its aftermath, particularly the fate of those who were repatriated to the Soviet Union. Students are expected to prepare the study trip through extensive reading. Notes, visual and audio files should be taken during the study trip. The study trip will close with a workshop in Oldenburg (on October 29) to provide space for articulating different perspectives on the topics. Students are also invited to write (photo) essays, poems etc. that can be published in journals or on websites. Costs EMMIR will cover all of the expenses connected to the educational parts of the study trip; you will have to contribute 80 Euro (for accommodation and local travel) and self-fund your travel to and from Berlin.
Study trip - Dr. Katharina Hoffmann
  • Master
3.02.180 S Ye rude slaves, leave your gaping: Changes in the English Language Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 17/10/19)
Dates on Tuesday. 11.02.20 09:00 - 11:00

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Cornelia Hamann
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
20.01.322 English Success at Work -5- Communication Skills Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 15/10/19)

Description:
The Success in Business Course is composed of 3 business courses (Application Skills; Communication Skills; Grammar and Vocabulary Skills). http://www.uni-oldenburg.de/fk3/sprachenzentrum/sprachen/englisch/kursangebot/success-in-business/ The Success in Business Course is composed of 3 business courses (Application Skills; Communication Skills; Grammar and Vocabulary Skills). http://www.uni-oldenburg.de/fk3/sprachenzentrum/sprachen/englisch/kursangebot/success-in-business/
Language course 2 Richard Dawton
  • Bachelor
3.02.191 S Making Learning Visible in the EFL Classroom Monday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 14/10/19)

Description:
On successful completion of this module, students should - be familiar with current research in the field of evidence-based teaching, especially John Hattie`s Visible Learning and Visible Learning for Teachers -be able to explain the difference between competence-based teaching as opposed to instructive approaches -be familiar with the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) and be able to explain its significance and the impact it has had on language teaching -know and be able to analyze syllabuses and curricula aimed at different age and ability groups -be able to develop and evaluate lesson plans relying on the task-based approach but also on “classical” ways of lesson planning (PPP) - be able to critically consider a variety of assessment methods suitable for classroom use -be able to plan for differentiation in accordance with the syllabus -be able to comment on “real-life” case studies of individuals and groups of language learners thus practicing their diagnostic skills -make informed decisions on methods, seating, use of media etc. in light of current research-be aware of the way culture shapes attitudes towards (language) -learning and teaching and develop realistic goals for intercultural skills and communication, both in the classroom and beyond Participants are expected to: -provide commentaries on topics discussed in class -pass a written exam (“Klausur”) at the end of the semester On successful completion of this module, students should - be familiar with current research in the field of evidence-based teaching, especially John Hattie`s Visible Learning and Visible Learning for Teachers -be able to explain the difference between competence-based teaching as opposed to instructive approaches -be familiar with the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) and be able to explain its significance and the impact it has had on language teaching -know and be able to analyze syllabuses and curricula aimed at different age and ability groups -be able to develop and evaluate lesson plans relying on the task-based approach but also on “classical” ways of lesson planning (PPP) - be able to critically consider a variety of assessment methods suitable for classroom use -be able to plan for differentiation in accordance with the syllabus -be able to comment on “real-life” case studies of individuals and groups of language learners thus practicing their diagnostic skills -make informed decisions on methods, seating, use of media etc. in light of current research-be aware of the way culture shapes attitudes towards (language) -learning and teaching and develop realistic goals for intercultural skills and communication, both in the classroom and beyond Participants are expected to: -provide commentaries on topics discussed in class -pass a written exam (“Klausur”) at the end of the semester
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.05.472 Musik und Gesundheit Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 17/10/19)

Description:
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Gunter Kreutz
  • Bachelor
  • Master
  • Master of Education
3.02.041 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Wednesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 16/10/19)

Description:
Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses
Exercises 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
3.90.144 EMMIR LS Workshop 5 Monitoring and evaluation in practice Dates on Tuesday. 19.11.19 18:00 - 20:00, Wednesday. 20.11.19 08:00 - 12:00
Description:
Workshop - Gast Dozent
  • Master
3.02.220 S Beyond Brexit: Britain, Europe and (the issue of national) Identity Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 24/10/19)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Richard Stinshoff
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
20.01.313 English for University Studies-3-Comprehensive Language Skills A Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 17/10/19)
Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 18/10/19)

Description:
Language course 4 Richard Dawton
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.90.134 EMMIR Study trip + WS Roma in Europe The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Roma are one of the biggest and most under-researched minorities in Europe. While they are under-represented in main sectors of society, such as education and labor market, discrimination remains flagrant among the European states. Only recently the European Commission’s Framework on Roma integration was set up and is slowly being implemented in national agendas. The study trip to the Czech Republic aims at exploring the many layers of discrimination and negative representation of Roma, de-coding the mechanisms and structures behind the processes of exclusion that are not unique to Roma minority only. Another objective of the study trip is to engage students in the current discussions related to this topic and let them reflect upon some examples of good practice in cities of Prague, České Budějovice, Český Krumlov and Brno. In summer 2013, České Budějovice, as one of many Czech cities, experienced a series of violent anti-Roma demonstrations and marches. In a response, many discussions, meetings and conferences were held with an objective to search for a cause of such an unforeseen development and to debate possible solutions. What are the results of these debates? What is the recent development? To what extent the involved institutions and organizations cooperate and what level of cooperation is necessary for improvement of the situation? Are those debates still relevant in 2017 in the light of ‘new and more urgent/visible’ development related to the so-called refugee crisis? Costs EMMIR will cover all of the expenses connected to the educational parts of the study trip; you will have to contribute 80 Euro (for accommodation and local travel) and self-fund your travel to and from the Czech Republic. Readings • OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights. "Hate Crime Laws." (2009). Web. [p.53] • Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada. “Czech Republic: Information on skinheads and other extremist groups”, 1 January 1998, CZE28659.E. http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/Eng. • Růžička, M. “Researching and Politicizing Migration: The Case of Roma/Gypsies in Post-Socialist Czecho-Slovakia.” Boundaries in Motion: Rethinking Contemporary Migration Events. Eds. Hofírek, O., Klvaňová, R., Nekorjak, M. Brno: Centre for the Study of Democracy and Culture, 2009. [pp. 79–103] • Orta, Lucy. Mapping the invisible: EU-Roma Gypsies. Black Dog Publishing, 2010. Costs EMMIR will cover expenses connected to the educational parts of the study trip; you will have to contribute 80 Euro (for accommodation and local travel) and self-fund your travel to and from České Budějovice. More information will be provided by the organisers on September 10. Organisers: Kateřina Marešová & Salim Murad, USB Roma are one of the biggest and most under-researched minorities in Europe. While they are under-represented in main sectors of society, such as education and labor market, discrimination remains flagrant among the European states. Only recently the European Commission’s Framework on Roma integration was set up and is slowly being implemented in national agendas. The study trip to the Czech Republic aims at exploring the many layers of discrimination and negative representation of Roma, de-coding the mechanisms and structures behind the processes of exclusion that are not unique to Roma minority only. Another objective of the study trip is to engage students in the current discussions related to this topic and let them reflect upon some examples of good practice in cities of Prague, České Budějovice, Český Krumlov and Brno. In summer 2013, České Budějovice, as one of many Czech cities, experienced a series of violent anti-Roma demonstrations and marches. In a response, many discussions, meetings and conferences were held with an objective to search for a cause of such an unforeseen development and to debate possible solutions. What are the results of these debates? What is the recent development? To what extent the involved institutions and organizations cooperate and what level of cooperation is necessary for improvement of the situation? Are those debates still relevant in 2017 in the light of ‘new and more urgent/visible’ development related to the so-called refugee crisis? Costs EMMIR will cover all of the expenses connected to the educational parts of the study trip; you will have to contribute 80 Euro (for accommodation and local travel) and self-fund your travel to and from the Czech Republic. Readings • OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights. "Hate Crime Laws." (2009). Web. [p.53] • Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada. “Czech Republic: Information on skinheads and other extremist groups”, 1 January 1998, CZE28659.E. http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/Eng. • Růžička, M. “Researching and Politicizing Migration: The Case of Roma/Gypsies in Post-Socialist Czecho-Slovakia.” Boundaries in Motion: Rethinking Contemporary Migration Events. Eds. Hofírek, O., Klvaňová, R., Nekorjak, M. Brno: Centre for the Study of Democracy and Culture, 2009. [pp. 79–103] • Orta, Lucy. Mapping the invisible: EU-Roma Gypsies. Black Dog Publishing, 2010. Costs EMMIR will cover expenses connected to the educational parts of the study trip; you will have to contribute 80 Euro (for accommodation and local travel) and self-fund your travel to and from České Budějovice. More information will be provided by the organisers on September 10. Organisers: Kateřina Marešová & Salim Murad, USB
Study trip - Gast Dozent
  • Master
3.90.136 EMMIR WS Migration and Refugee Law Courses Dates on Monday. 28.10.19 - Tuesday. 29.10.19 10:00 - 14:00
Description:
Workshop - Gast Dozent
  • Master
3.02.197 S Content and Language Integrated Learning Monday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 14/10/19)

Description:
Seminar 2 Gerrit Alexander Helm
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.998 S Multiple Imaginations: Germany's Pasts and Presents Dates on Friday. 15.11.19 16:00 - 20:00, Saturday. 16.11.19 - Sunday. 17.11.19 10:00 - 19:00, Room: A01 0-009, A01 0-007, (Museum "Deutsches Auswandererhaus" in Bremerhaven)
Description:
In this seminar, we will work on different narratives about and representations of what is imagined – in different times and under different (political, social, economic) circumstances – as ‘Germany’. We will explore what ‘Germany’ supposedly is and gain a deeper understanding of it. With a cultural studies perspective we will look at what and who is represented by whom as ‘German(y)’, who and what is excluded by the narratives, what the specific circumstances for specific narratives are, and which counter-narratives can be found. The aim of the seminar is not to study what is called ‘Germany’ or ‘Europe’ but to learn about representation and perspectives of (multiple) self-imaginations, how they are constructed in different narratives and which functions these imaginations serve. In the context of this seminar, we do a joint study trip to the Auswandererhaus in Bremerhaven to explore different narratives and representations about Germany’s past and present. With a selection of texts and short films we will examine issues of exclusion and inclusion, and their implications. In this seminar, we will work on different narratives about and representations of what is imagined – in different times and under different (political, social, economic) circumstances – as ‘Germany’. We will explore what ‘Germany’ supposedly is and gain a deeper understanding of it. With a cultural studies perspective we will look at what and who is represented by whom as ‘German(y)’, who and what is excluded by the narratives, what the specific circumstances for specific narratives are, and which counter-narratives can be found. The aim of the seminar is not to study what is called ‘Germany’ or ‘Europe’ but to learn about representation and perspectives of (multiple) self-imaginations, how they are constructed in different narratives and which functions these imaginations serve. In the context of this seminar, we do a joint study trip to the Auswandererhaus in Bremerhaven to explore different narratives and representations about Germany’s past and present. With a selection of texts and short films we will examine issues of exclusion and inclusion, and their implications.
Seminar - Sunday Omwenyeke
Lea Brenningmeyer
3.02.001 V Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 16/10/19)

Description:
Lecture 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Bachelor
3.05.471 Psychology of Music and Wellbeing Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 14/10/19)

Description:
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Gunter Kreutz
  • Master
  • Master of Education
3.02.112 b) Written English: Writing About Film Noir Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 16/10/19)

Description:
“How I detest the dawn. The grass looks as though it’s been left out all night” The Dark Corner (1946). The beautiful, seductive and dangerous femme fatale, the private eye, the anti-hero, chiaroscuro, low-key lighting, high-angle shots, rain-washed streets, scuttling footsteps fading into the distance, crime, corruption, death, suffering, paranoia, tragedy, unhappiness and existential despair are all characteristics of film noir, a genre of the 1940s and 1950s with its roots in German Expressionism. This course takes the example of film noir as a way of exploring evaluative and analytical film writing. Whilst websites such as 'Rotten Tomatoes' tend to publish opinion-based reviews, academic film writing, like that found in the journal 'Sight & Sound', is based on a viewer’s “reading” of a film, which is supplemented by critical, technical analysis and argumentation. This course aims to develop your writing in both genres, enabling you to move from having an opinion on a film to augmenting your own “reading” of it with technical, genre-specific knowledge, subject-specific vocabulary and in-depth analysis. This Written English course forms one half of the compulsory module ang311: Integrated Language Skills. The module is assessed via a portfolio and the assessment requirements here are a take-home essay and a written language test. The grade will be added to the result from Spoken English. Homework assignments as required by the lecturer will count towards active participation. “How I detest the dawn. The grass looks as though it’s been left out all night” The Dark Corner (1946). The beautiful, seductive and dangerous femme fatale, the private eye, the anti-hero, chiaroscuro, low-key lighting, high-angle shots, rain-washed streets, scuttling footsteps fading into the distance, crime, corruption, death, suffering, paranoia, tragedy, unhappiness and existential despair are all characteristics of film noir, a genre of the 1940s and 1950s with its roots in German Expressionism. This course takes the example of film noir as a way of exploring evaluative and analytical film writing. Whilst websites such as 'Rotten Tomatoes' tend to publish opinion-based reviews, academic film writing, like that found in the journal 'Sight & Sound', is based on a viewer’s “reading” of a film, which is supplemented by critical, technical analysis and argumentation. This course aims to develop your writing in both genres, enabling you to move from having an opinion on a film to augmenting your own “reading” of it with technical, genre-specific knowledge, subject-specific vocabulary and in-depth analysis. This Written English course forms one half of the compulsory module ang311: Integrated Language Skills. The module is assessed via a portfolio and the assessment requirements here are a take-home essay and a written language test. The grade will be added to the result from Spoken English. Homework assignments as required by the lecturer will count towards active participation.
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.173 S Pragmatic Theories: Meaning in Context Friday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 18/10/19)

Description:
How can we convey meaning to a hearer successfully? How can a hearer understand what a speaker means? This course aims to provide the students with a holistic understanding of the differences between meaning in and out of context. Therefore, we are going to investigate the elusive line between semantics and pragmatics. Although this course introduces pragmatic theories, it nevertheless relies on practical examples of spoken language to show which areas of natural language these theories describe. In other words: The theories introduced in this course are all applicable to communicative situations we all are familiar with. How can we convey meaning to a hearer successfully? How can a hearer understand what a speaker means? This course aims to provide the students with a holistic understanding of the differences between meaning in and out of context. Therefore, we are going to investigate the elusive line between semantics and pragmatics. Although this course introduces pragmatic theories, it nevertheless relies on practical examples of spoken language to show which areas of natural language these theories describe. In other words: The theories introduced in this course are all applicable to communicative situations we all are familiar with.
Seminar 2 Robert Sowa
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
20.01.315 English for University Studies-4-Language Functions Wednesday: 08:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 16/10/19)

Description:
Language course 4 Wenny Susanto-Berky
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.90.147 EMMIR LS Workshop 8 Small culture formation on the go: negotiating blocks and threads Dates on Wednesday. 13.11.19 09:00 - 11:00
Description:
Workshop - Gast Dozent
  • Master
3.90.122 EMMIR mir120 Research Teams A/B Dates on Wednesday. 02.10.19, Thursday. 10.10.19, Thursday. 17.10.19, Thursday. 07.11.19, Thursday. 14.11.19, Thursday. 21.11.19, Thursday. 28.11.19 14:00 - 16:00
Description:
Exercises - Dr. Lydia Potts
  • Master
3.02.141 S Postcolonial Science Fiction Wednesday: 14:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 16/10/19)

Description:
“Arguably, one of the most familiar memes of science fiction is that of going to foreign countries and colonizing the natives, and […] for many of us, that’s not a thrilling adventure story, it’s non-fiction, and we are on the wrong side of the strange-looking ship that appears out of nowhere”, writes Canadian science fiction author Nalo Hopkinson. What do science fiction stories look like when they are imagined from “the wrong side of the strange-looking ship”? How can science fiction be used to criticize the legacy of European colonial exploitation? How do science fiction’s tropes and conventions change in the hands of authors form, say, Africa, India, or the Caribbean? In exploring these questions, we will look at a variety of novels, short stories, and films. Along the way, we might also have to rethink what we mean when we say “science fiction” and we will also discuss what makes a particular story or author “postcolonial”. We will discuss two novels, Amitav Ghosh’s The Calcutta Chromosome and Nnedi Okorafor’s Lagoon, both of which you should purchase and read before the term starts. For our first session, we will discuss Ryan Coogler’s Black Panther (2018) – if you haven’t seen the film yet, do so before our first meeting. We will meet in double sessions every other week (starting on 23 October); this will not only give us the opportunity to delve deeply into the set texts, we will also be able to spend some time on reflecting on your reading and research strategies, as well as on developing ideas for your research paper. “Arguably, one of the most familiar memes of science fiction is that of going to foreign countries and colonizing the natives, and […] for many of us, that’s not a thrilling adventure story, it’s non-fiction, and we are on the wrong side of the strange-looking ship that appears out of nowhere”, writes Canadian science fiction author Nalo Hopkinson. What do science fiction stories look like when they are imagined from “the wrong side of the strange-looking ship”? How can science fiction be used to criticize the legacy of European colonial exploitation? How do science fiction’s tropes and conventions change in the hands of authors form, say, Africa, India, or the Caribbean? In exploring these questions, we will look at a variety of novels, short stories, and films. Along the way, we might also have to rethink what we mean when we say “science fiction” and we will also discuss what makes a particular story or author “postcolonial”. We will discuss two novels, Amitav Ghosh’s The Calcutta Chromosome and Nnedi Okorafor’s Lagoon, both of which you should purchase and read before the term starts. For our first session, we will discuss Ryan Coogler’s Black Panther (2018) – if you haven’t seen the film yet, do so before our first meeting. We will meet in double sessions every other week (starting on 23 October); this will not only give us the opportunity to delve deeply into the set texts, we will also be able to spend some time on reflecting on your reading and research strategies, as well as on developing ideas for your research paper.
Seminar 4 Dr. des. Karsten Levihn-Kutzler
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.90.126 EMMIR WS Qualitative Methods in Migration Research (incl introduction to Atlas TI) Dates on Friday. 06.12.19 09:00 - 17:00
Description:
EMMIR workshop held by Dr. Ulrike Schultz, Adventist University Friedensau The course introduces you to different methods of analyzing qualitative data. The focus will be on the coding procedure of Grounded Theory but you will as well be made familiar with qualitative content analysis and biographical methods. Beside the theoretical discussion of different methods in analyzing qualitative data, you will get the opportunity to apply different methods in exercises. For the exercises, we will make use of the software Atlas TI. A free trial version (you will need to have it installed on your computer for the workshop) can be downloaded at www.atlasti.com/demo.html   Schedule and Readings 9.00 Analyzing Data in Qualitative Research: An Overview Lecture Baptiste, Ian. "Qualitative data analysis: Common phases, strategic differences." Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung/Forum: Qualitative Social Research. Vol. 2. No. 3. 2001. Huberman, A. Michael, and Matthew B. Miles. "Data management and analysis methods." (1994). In: Denzin, Norman K. Collecting and interpreting qualitative materials. Vol. 3. Sage, 2008. 9.30 Introduction in Atlas.ti Exercise Konopásek, Zdeněk. "Making thinking visible with Atlas.ti: Computer assisted qualitative analysis as textual practices." Historical Social Research/Historische Sozialforschung. Supplement (2007): 276-298. 10.00 Coding Procedures in Grounded Theory 1, Open Coding Lecture and Exercise with Atlas.ti Charmaz, Kathy. “Coding in Grounded Theory Practice” Page: 43-71. In: Fàbregues, Sergi, and Marie-Hélène Paré. "Charmaz, Kathy C. (2006). Constructing Grounded Theory: A Practical Guide Through Qualitative Analysis." Papers. Revista De Sociologia 86.86 (2007): 284-287. Web. 11.30 Coding Procedure in Grounded Theory Axial Coding Selective Coding Lecture and Exercise Wilson Scott, Karen, and Dana Howell. "Clarifying Analysis and Interpretation in Grounded Theory: Using a Conditional Relationship Guide and Reflective Coding Matrix." International Journal of Qualitative Methods 7.2 (2008): 1-15. Web. 14.00 Qualitative Content Analysis Lecture and Exercise with Atlas.ti Mayring, Philipp. "Qualitative Content Analysis." Forum: Qualitative Social Research 1.2 (2000): Forum: Qualitative Social Research, 01 June 2000, Vol.1(2). Web. 16.00 Biographical Methods Lecture and Group Work Gültekin, Nevâl, Lena Inowlocki, and Helma Lutz. "Quest and Query: Interpreting a Biographical Interview with a Turkish Woman Laborer in Germany." Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung 31.3 (117) (2006): 50-71. Web. 17.30 Evaluation Bio-Note Dr. Ulrike Schultz is a sociologist with a specialisation in development and gender studies. She currently holds a professorship in development studies at the Adventist University of Friedensau. She is also teaching at African Universities and organised summer schools and workshops in Africa and Germany. Her main research fields are household economics, gender politics in Africa and refugee studies. Her current research project deals with "Ethnic belonging and return migration after the CPA in Sudan". Ulrike Schultz has a long experience of fieldwork in Sudan and Kenya. She uses qualitative research methods and regularly teaches qualitative research methods in African and German universities. EMMIR workshop held by Dr. Ulrike Schultz, Adventist University Friedensau The course introduces you to different methods of analyzing qualitative data. The focus will be on the coding procedure of Grounded Theory but you will as well be made familiar with qualitative content analysis and biographical methods. Beside the theoretical discussion of different methods in analyzing qualitative data, you will get the opportunity to apply different methods in exercises. For the exercises, we will make use of the software Atlas TI. A free trial version (you will need to have it installed on your computer for the workshop) can be downloaded at www.atlasti.com/demo.html   Schedule and Readings 9.00 Analyzing Data in Qualitative Research: An Overview Lecture Baptiste, Ian. "Qualitative data analysis: Common phases, strategic differences." Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung/Forum: Qualitative Social Research. Vol. 2. No. 3. 2001. Huberman, A. Michael, and Matthew B. Miles. "Data management and analysis methods." (1994). In: Denzin, Norman K. Collecting and interpreting qualitative materials. Vol. 3. Sage, 2008. 9.30 Introduction in Atlas.ti Exercise Konopásek, Zdeněk. "Making thinking visible with Atlas.ti: Computer assisted qualitative analysis as textual practices." Historical Social Research/Historische Sozialforschung. Supplement (2007): 276-298. 10.00 Coding Procedures in Grounded Theory 1, Open Coding Lecture and Exercise with Atlas.ti Charmaz, Kathy. “Coding in Grounded Theory Practice” Page: 43-71. In: Fàbregues, Sergi, and Marie-Hélène Paré. "Charmaz, Kathy C. (2006). Constructing Grounded Theory: A Practical Guide Through Qualitative Analysis." Papers. Revista De Sociologia 86.86 (2007): 284-287. Web. 11.30 Coding Procedure in Grounded Theory Axial Coding Selective Coding Lecture and Exercise Wilson Scott, Karen, and Dana Howell. "Clarifying Analysis and Interpretation in Grounded Theory: Using a Conditional Relationship Guide and Reflective Coding Matrix." International Journal of Qualitative Methods 7.2 (2008): 1-15. Web. 14.00 Qualitative Content Analysis Lecture and Exercise with Atlas.ti Mayring, Philipp. "Qualitative Content Analysis." Forum: Qualitative Social Research 1.2 (2000): Forum: Qualitative Social Research, 01 June 2000, Vol.1(2). Web. 16.00 Biographical Methods Lecture and Group Work Gültekin, Nevâl, Lena Inowlocki, and Helma Lutz. "Quest and Query: Interpreting a Biographical Interview with a Turkish Woman Laborer in Germany." Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung 31.3 (117) (2006): 50-71. Web. 17.30 Evaluation Bio-Note Dr. Ulrike Schultz is a sociologist with a specialisation in development and gender studies. She currently holds a professorship in development studies at the Adventist University of Friedensau. She is also teaching at African Universities and organised summer schools and workshops in Africa and Germany. Her main research fields are household economics, gender politics in Africa and refugee studies. Her current research project deals with "Ethnic belonging and return migration after the CPA in Sudan". Ulrike Schultz has a long experience of fieldwork in Sudan and Kenya. She uses qualitative research methods and regularly teaches qualitative research methods in African and German universities.
Workshop - Gast Dozent
  • Master
3.90.123 EMMIR mir120 Research Teams C/D Dates on Wednesday. 02.10.19, Thursday. 10.10.19, Thursday. 17.10.19, Thursday. 07.11.19, Thursday. 14.11.19, Thursday. 21.11.19, Thursday. 28.11.19 14:00 - 16:00
Description:
Exercises - Dr. rer. pol. Mahmut Murat Ardag
Dr. rer. pol. Berna Öney
  • Master
3.02.044 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 18/10/19)

Description:
Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses
Exercises 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.90.135 EMMIR WS Queering Globalization (Wise19/20) Dates on Monday. 28.10.19, Friday. 01.11.19 14:00 - 18:00
Description:
Workshop - Dr. phil. Lüder Tietz, M.A.
  • Master
3.02.082 (h) Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Wednesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 16/10/19)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.02.172 S Variational pragmatics: Investigating (in-) directness across cultures and varieties Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 17/10/19)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.131 S New England Imaginaries: Puritanism to Postmodernism Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 16/10/19), Location: A05 1-160
Dates on Wednesday. 15.01.20 18:00 - 20:00, Room: V03 0-C003

Description:
What is and what was New England? How has this part of the United States—one of the most historically significant of all—been constructed in terms of its name, its image, and its legacy as, precisely, the new England; a recasting of an empire and worldview, the customs and cultural strictures of which were eventually discarded? What is specific about the literature and culture of and about New England, and who are its representative authors and artists? This seminar offers a survey of North American literary history concerned with the large region of New England, from the sermons of the Puritans, via transcendentalism and the historical romance in the nineteenth century, late naturalism and modernist narratives, weird and pulp fiction magazines, all the way to confessionalist writing and postmodern poetry and prose. Focusing on a specific locale, this seminar considers a highly diverse group of authors, including John Winthrop, Anne Bradstreet, Cotton Mather, Phillis Wheatley, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller, Emily Dickinson, Edith Wharton, Arthur Miller, H. P. Lovecraft, Charles Olson, Sylvia Plath, Bret Easton Ellis, and Susan Howe. In addition to the literary trajectory of distinct visions and revisions of New England as a region and a cultural environment, the participants of the seminar will become familiar with the media practices and non-literary forms of expression, such as fine art, photography, and film (such as 'The Trouble with Harry' or 'The Witch: A New England Folktale'). On a theoretical level, we will contemplate the tension between the literary and cultural representation of spaces and places of a region such as New England, on the one hand, and, on the other, the historical and political circumstances at the time of a given representation or cultural form of expression. Aside from the short fiction, poetry, and theoretical texts, which will be made available at the start of the semester, the following novels need to be purchased by the participants: - Nathaniel Hawthorne, 'The House of the Seven Gables' - Edith Wharton, 'Ethan Frome' - Bret Easton Ellis, 'The Rules of Attraction' What is and what was New England? How has this part of the United States—one of the most historically significant of all—been constructed in terms of its name, its image, and its legacy as, precisely, the new England; a recasting of an empire and worldview, the customs and cultural strictures of which were eventually discarded? What is specific about the literature and culture of and about New England, and who are its representative authors and artists? This seminar offers a survey of North American literary history concerned with the large region of New England, from the sermons of the Puritans, via transcendentalism and the historical romance in the nineteenth century, late naturalism and modernist narratives, weird and pulp fiction magazines, all the way to confessionalist writing and postmodern poetry and prose. Focusing on a specific locale, this seminar considers a highly diverse group of authors, including John Winthrop, Anne Bradstreet, Cotton Mather, Phillis Wheatley, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller, Emily Dickinson, Edith Wharton, Arthur Miller, H. P. Lovecraft, Charles Olson, Sylvia Plath, Bret Easton Ellis, and Susan Howe. In addition to the literary trajectory of distinct visions and revisions of New England as a region and a cultural environment, the participants of the seminar will become familiar with the media practices and non-literary forms of expression, such as fine art, photography, and film (such as 'The Trouble with Harry' or 'The Witch: A New England Folktale'). On a theoretical level, we will contemplate the tension between the literary and cultural representation of spaces and places of a region such as New England, on the one hand, and, on the other, the historical and political circumstances at the time of a given representation or cultural form of expression. Aside from the short fiction, poetry, and theoretical texts, which will be made available at the start of the semester, the following novels need to be purchased by the participants: - Nathaniel Hawthorne, 'The House of the Seven Gables' - Edith Wharton, 'Ethan Frome' - Bret Easton Ellis, 'The Rules of Attraction'
Seminar 2 Dr. Julius Greve
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.202 S Media Literacy in ELT Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 14/10/19)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Birte Sause
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
20.01.326 Wirtschaftsenglisch 2 Thursday: 12:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 17/10/19)

Description:
In der Sprache Englisch wird ein 6-minütiger mündlicher Einstufungstest vorausgesetzt, der zu folgenden Terminen stattfindet: 23.09.2019 von 9-13 Uhr 24.09.2019 von 9-15 Uhr 25.09.2019 von 9-15 Uhr 09.10.2019 von 9-13 Uhr 10.10.2019 von 9-13 Uhr Für einen Testtermin tragen Sie sich bitte bei einer der folgenden Personen in Stud.IP! für die Sprechstundentermine ein: Maike Engelhardt Richard Dawton Eric Ahlberg Geraldine Barry Die Ergebnisse der Einstufung werden Ihnen direkt beim Test mitgeteilt. Ab dem 25.09.2019 - 10.00 Uhr bis zum 30.09.2019 - 23.59 Uhr können Sie sich selbst in den entsprechenden Kurs eintragen. In der Sprache Englisch wird ein 6-minütiger mündlicher Einstufungstest vorausgesetzt, der zu folgenden Terminen stattfindet: 23.09.2019 von 9-13 Uhr 24.09.2019 von 9-15 Uhr 25.09.2019 von 9-15 Uhr 09.10.2019 von 9-13 Uhr 10.10.2019 von 9-13 Uhr Für einen Testtermin tragen Sie sich bitte bei einer der folgenden Personen in Stud.IP! für die Sprechstundentermine ein: Maike Engelhardt Richard Dawton Eric Ahlberg Geraldine Barry Die Ergebnisse der Einstufung werden Ihnen direkt beim Test mitgeteilt. Ab dem 25.09.2019 - 10.00 Uhr bis zum 30.09.2019 - 23.59 Uhr können Sie sich selbst in den entsprechenden Kurs eintragen.
Language course 4 Geraldine Barry
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.90.143 EMMIR LS Workshop 4 Visualizing and Explaining Migration Network Data in UCINET Dates on Friday. 15.11.19 10:00 - 15:00
Description:
Workshop - Gast Dozent
  • Master
3.02.407 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Designing Reading Materials (10-12) Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 15/10/19)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Master
  • Master of Education
3.90.141 EMMIR LS Workshop 2 Social Representations Theory & Migration Dates on Tuesday. 15.10.19 18:00 - 20:00, Wednesday. 16.10.19 08:00 - 12:00
Description:
Workshop - Gast Dozent
  • Master
3.02.081 (f) Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 16/10/19)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.90.145 EMMIR LS Workshop 6 Multi-sited matched sampled ethnography Dates on Monday. 25.11.19 14:00 - 16:00, Tuesday. 26.11.19 13:00 - 17:00
Description:
Workshop - Gast Dozent
  • Master
3.90.142 EMMIR LS Workshop 3 Globalisation and Refugee Economy Dates on Tuesday. 29.10.19 18:00 - 20:00, Wednesday. 30.10.19 09:30 - 13:30, Friday. 01.11.19 10:00 - 14:00
Description:
Workshop - Gast Dozent
  • Master
70 Seminars

Top