Veranstaltungsverzeichnis

Veranstaltungsverzeichnis

Institute of English and American Studies Click here for PDF-Download

Summer semester 2024 114 Seminars
VAK Course Number Title Type Lecture
Preliminary studies
Advanced courses
Practical course
Colloquium
Research group
Workgroup
Project group
Council conference
Internship
Language course
Subject didactics
Excursion
Tutorial
Committee
SWS Semester weekly hours Teachers Degree
3.02.003 Review: Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 03/04/24)

Description:
This voluntary revision course is designed to provide a systematic review of content the lecture ang 049 covers. By focusing on skills participants are expected to have aquired prior to the end-of-term testpaper, our sessions are designed to provide hands-on revision tasks and the opportunity to explore and discuss issues in EFL teaching from different angles. Your personal views and experiences will also be taken into account in order to create a comprehensive picture of your future role and skillset as EFL classroom practitioner. Teaching methods comprise -exercises and tasks, -group assignments, -short presentations among your peers. Learning materials will be provided. Intended Learning Outcomes: By the end of term, participants are expected to -be familiar with the content of lecture ang 049. -be able to tackle tasks applying the knowledge gained. -reflect on their own role as future EFL practitioner. Formative assessment methods due to voluntary basis of participation: -self & peer assessment -opportunity for individual coaching and tutoring at the end of each session Please note that the language used in this course is English! If the need arises, however, I am happy to discuss aspects in German, too. This voluntary revision course is designed to provide a systematic review of content the lecture ang 049 covers. By focusing on skills participants are expected to have aquired prior to the end-of-term testpaper, our sessions are designed to provide hands-on revision tasks and the opportunity to explore and discuss issues in EFL teaching from different angles. Your personal views and experiences will also be taken into account in order to create a comprehensive picture of your future role and skillset as EFL classroom practitioner. Teaching methods comprise -exercises and tasks, -group assignments, -short presentations among your peers. Learning materials will be provided. Intended Learning Outcomes: By the end of term, participants are expected to -be familiar with the content of lecture ang 049. -be able to tackle tasks applying the knowledge gained. -reflect on their own role as future EFL practitioner. Formative assessment methods due to voluntary basis of participation: -self & peer assessment -opportunity for individual coaching and tutoring at the end of each session Please note that the language used in this course is English! If the need arises, however, I am happy to discuss aspects in German, too.
Exercises 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.110 Ü Written English: British pop music and society - the case of Morrissey Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 10/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. David William West
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.081 Informationen zum Basismodul ang080 Wednesday: 14:00 - 15:00, fortnightly (from 22/05/24)
Wednesday: 14:00 - 15:00, weekly (from 03/04/24)
Friday: 12:00 - 12:30, weekly (from 20/10/23), Language Resource Blocks
Dates on Tuesday, 19.03.2024 10:00 - 11:30

Description:
miscellaneous - Lauren Freede
Johanna Hasanen
Rachel Ramsay
Inga Zalyevska
Dylan Rhea Rush
John-Martin Winter
Dr. David William West
  • Bachelor
3.02.130 Female subjectivities in Caribbean fiction Friday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 05/04/24)

Description:
COURSE DESCRIPTION AND GOALS: While, traditionally, the study of anglophone literature and culture, both in universities and schools, has often focused on material from the British Isles and the United States, recent decades have brought increased awareness that it is important to extend our perspective and also consider other parts of the anglophone world, such as the Caribbean. Thus, this seminar gives students (many of whom will probably be new to Caribbean Studies) the opportunity to familiarise themselves with the history and culture/s of this region, as well as exploring some key authors, texts and topics of anglophone Caribbean literature from the mid-20th century to the present. Our thematic focus will be on the portrayal of female sensibilities (mainly by female, but partly also male, writers), in different generations and life situations. For instance, we will reflect on representations of how Caribbean women’s lives have been affected by colonial history and its long-lasting after-effects; by social hierarchies in terms of ‘race’, class and gender; by intercultural encounters and cultural hybridity; migration and diaspora; by familial and textual genealogies; as well as by experiences of trauma, resistance and recuperation. Depending on student interests, we may also spend a little time reflecting on how Caribbean literary texts, and the issues they raise, can be included in EFL school-teaching. SET TEXTS: We will read two novels in their entirety; these are: • Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea (1st publ. 1966) • Ramabai Espinet, The Swinging Bridge (1st publ. 2003) Student should purchase these in advance (no prescribed editions). In addition, we will read a selection of short stories (e.g. by Paule Marshall, Pauline Melville, Olive Senior and Jacob Ross), as well as some secondary literature. All these shorter texts will be made available via our online course platform Stud.IP. OPTIONAL EXTRA READING: If you would like to do some preliminary / extra reading on social and literary history, and/or need advice on texts to read in preparation for your presentations, you will be able to access a bibliography of key introductory texts on Stud.IP from the beginning of term onwards. Some of those texts will also be made available via our course bookshelf in the university library. COURSEWORK, CREDITS AND ASSIGNMENTS: Requirements for passing this course and acquiring credits are: 1) Regular attendance & active participation 2) 1 graded assignment / Prüfungsleistung. In this course, this takes the form of a presentation (c.15–30 min.) with subsequent write-up (c.10 pp.) COURSE DESCRIPTION AND GOALS: While, traditionally, the study of anglophone literature and culture, both in universities and schools, has often focused on material from the British Isles and the United States, recent decades have brought increased awareness that it is important to extend our perspective and also consider other parts of the anglophone world, such as the Caribbean. Thus, this seminar gives students (many of whom will probably be new to Caribbean Studies) the opportunity to familiarise themselves with the history and culture/s of this region, as well as exploring some key authors, texts and topics of anglophone Caribbean literature from the mid-20th century to the present. Our thematic focus will be on the portrayal of female sensibilities (mainly by female, but partly also male, writers), in different generations and life situations. For instance, we will reflect on representations of how Caribbean women’s lives have been affected by colonial history and its long-lasting after-effects; by social hierarchies in terms of ‘race’, class and gender; by intercultural encounters and cultural hybridity; migration and diaspora; by familial and textual genealogies; as well as by experiences of trauma, resistance and recuperation. Depending on student interests, we may also spend a little time reflecting on how Caribbean literary texts, and the issues they raise, can be included in EFL school-teaching. SET TEXTS: We will read two novels in their entirety; these are: • Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea (1st publ. 1966) • Ramabai Espinet, The Swinging Bridge (1st publ. 2003) Student should purchase these in advance (no prescribed editions). In addition, we will read a selection of short stories (e.g. by Paule Marshall, Pauline Melville, Olive Senior and Jacob Ross), as well as some secondary literature. All these shorter texts will be made available via our online course platform Stud.IP. OPTIONAL EXTRA READING: If you would like to do some preliminary / extra reading on social and literary history, and/or need advice on texts to read in preparation for your presentations, you will be able to access a bibliography of key introductory texts on Stud.IP from the beginning of term onwards. Some of those texts will also be made available via our course bookshelf in the university library. COURSEWORK, CREDITS AND ASSIGNMENTS: Requirements for passing this course and acquiring credits are: 1) Regular attendance & active participation 2) 1 graded assignment / Prüfungsleistung. In this course, this takes the form of a presentation (c.15–30 min.) with subsequent write-up (c.10 pp.)
Seminar 2 PD Dr. Silke Stroh
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.309 KO Research Colloquium in Language Use, Variation and Change Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 03/04/24)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.191 S Dimensions of Diversity in the Inclusive EFL Classroom Monday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 08/04/24), Location: A14 1-112, V03 0-D001

Description:
Starting out with a definition of diversity and the application of diversity education in different contexts, this class aims at exploring different manifestations of the term both at school and classroom level. Using curriculum research as a starting point, national, European and multicultural values will be regarded against the backdrop of educational policies. A postcolonial perspective and the phenomenon of globalisation contribute to a more complex grasp the issues at hand. Looking at the situation in countries such as the UK or the US, home and school languages will be contrasted. A special focus on EAL (English as an additional language) and bilingual upbringing add to the topic of linguistic diversity. As a next step, language diversity in education will be examined as a broader term and then specified as “translanguaging across the bilingual continuum” (Ofelia García). Language policies as a political statement will be an important point of discussion and possibly contention. This will also include the idea (or ideology?) of the native speaker ideal, which will be deconstructed but also regarded as a powerful influence on TESOL discourse and teaching traditions. Finally, the concept of language-sensitive teaching and its impact on the TESOL classroom will be put under scrutiny. Participants are encouraged to contribute more examples of diversity to our discourse in class. Heteronormativity, e.g. as reflected in textbooks, could be a starting point for a critical discussion of the state of affairs in German schools. Besides, trauma-sensitive teaching will also be part of the syllabus due to its increasing relevance, How can equality, diversity and inclusion actually be put into practice? What are practical tools for pluralistic approaches in TESOL classes? The idea of an inclusive classroom in Lower Saxony and its curricular manifestations will be amended by examples of other institutions, e.g. the British Council. In this context, different documents, concepts, resources and interviews with practitioners will be studied and critically reflected upon. One particular displacement story will serve as a starting point to ask how literary learning can contribute to a more diverse approach towards TESOL teaching. The course finishes by focusing on the question how differentiation can foster learning in the TESOL classroom. The concept of differentiation will be examined from a variety of angles and examples from teaching materials and textbooks serve as an opportunity to practise one`s analytical skills. Scaffolding is another important term participants need to be familiar with. Relevant references in the field will have to be studied in order to prepare for the final assessment. Assessment issues: Participants are expected to -contribute to discourse during class. (“Aktive Teilnahme”) -provide samples of their work. (“Aktive Teilnahme”) -pass an end-of-term test ON CAMPUS!!! (written assessment / Klausur) Starting out with a definition of diversity and the application of diversity education in different contexts, this class aims at exploring different manifestations of the term both at school and classroom level. Using curriculum research as a starting point, national, European and multicultural values will be regarded against the backdrop of educational policies. A postcolonial perspective and the phenomenon of globalisation contribute to a more complex grasp the issues at hand. Looking at the situation in countries such as the UK or the US, home and school languages will be contrasted. A special focus on EAL (English as an additional language) and bilingual upbringing add to the topic of linguistic diversity. As a next step, language diversity in education will be examined as a broader term and then specified as “translanguaging across the bilingual continuum” (Ofelia García). Language policies as a political statement will be an important point of discussion and possibly contention. This will also include the idea (or ideology?) of the native speaker ideal, which will be deconstructed but also regarded as a powerful influence on TESOL discourse and teaching traditions. Finally, the concept of language-sensitive teaching and its impact on the TESOL classroom will be put under scrutiny. Participants are encouraged to contribute more examples of diversity to our discourse in class. Heteronormativity, e.g. as reflected in textbooks, could be a starting point for a critical discussion of the state of affairs in German schools. Besides, trauma-sensitive teaching will also be part of the syllabus due to its increasing relevance, How can equality, diversity and inclusion actually be put into practice? What are practical tools for pluralistic approaches in TESOL classes? The idea of an inclusive classroom in Lower Saxony and its curricular manifestations will be amended by examples of other institutions, e.g. the British Council. In this context, different documents, concepts, resources and interviews with practitioners will be studied and critically reflected upon. One particular displacement story will serve as a starting point to ask how literary learning can contribute to a more diverse approach towards TESOL teaching. The course finishes by focusing on the question how differentiation can foster learning in the TESOL classroom. The concept of differentiation will be examined from a variety of angles and examples from teaching materials and textbooks serve as an opportunity to practise one`s analytical skills. Scaffolding is another important term participants need to be familiar with. Relevant references in the field will have to be studied in order to prepare for the final assessment. Assessment issues: Participants are expected to -contribute to discourse during class. (“Aktive Teilnahme”) -provide samples of their work. (“Aktive Teilnahme”) -pass an end-of-term test ON CAMPUS!!! (written assessment / Klausur)
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.980 S 19th-Century American Women's Fiction Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
This class focuses on women writers of the nineteenth century and several major discourses such as the transition from the social order of the Early Republic into Jacksonian Democracy, women's equality the Civil War, slavery and emancipation/racial uplift and, not least, women and literature. This class is interested not only in how women writers discursively represent nation, womanhood, equality, and racial uplift, but also in the artistic and literary ways in which these women’s writings contributed to shaping nineteenth century American literature and culture. Throughout April, we will collaborate with a class from Salem State University in Salem, Massachusetts. Because of the time difference, we won't meet online as a class. Rather, while jointly studying Catharine Maria Sedgwick's travelogue from Europe, you will work together in small groups according to your own time preferences across the Atlantic. Therefore, please make sure you have access to a decent internet connection for these meetings. The plan is to thus undertake a scholarly research project together that focuses on Catharine Maria Sedgwick's travels to Europe - and Germany in particular (e.g. a collaborative scholarly edition with annotations of her travels to Germany that we might eventually publish digitally). Alongside various nonfictional texts and short stories that will be made available on Stud.IP, students are asked to purchase and read the following novels: Catherine Maria Sedgwick, A New England Tale (1822); Louisa May Alcott, Hospital Sketches (1863); Harriet E. Wilson, Our Nig (1859). No specific editions are required. This class focuses on women writers of the nineteenth century and several major discourses such as the transition from the social order of the Early Republic into Jacksonian Democracy, women's equality the Civil War, slavery and emancipation/racial uplift and, not least, women and literature. This class is interested not only in how women writers discursively represent nation, womanhood, equality, and racial uplift, but also in the artistic and literary ways in which these women’s writings contributed to shaping nineteenth century American literature and culture. Throughout April, we will collaborate with a class from Salem State University in Salem, Massachusetts. Because of the time difference, we won't meet online as a class. Rather, while jointly studying Catharine Maria Sedgwick's travelogue from Europe, you will work together in small groups according to your own time preferences across the Atlantic. Therefore, please make sure you have access to a decent internet connection for these meetings. The plan is to thus undertake a scholarly research project together that focuses on Catharine Maria Sedgwick's travels to Europe - and Germany in particular (e.g. a collaborative scholarly edition with annotations of her travels to Germany that we might eventually publish digitally). Alongside various nonfictional texts and short stories that will be made available on Stud.IP, students are asked to purchase and read the following novels: Catherine Maria Sedgwick, A New England Tale (1822); Louisa May Alcott, Hospital Sketches (1863); Harriet E. Wilson, Our Nig (1859). No specific editions are required.
Seminar 2 Priv.-Doz. Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.075 Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: British culture and society Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. David William West
  • Bachelor
3.02.115 Ü Written English: British pop music and society - the case of Morrissey Wednesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 10/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. David William West
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.970 S Global Health, Biocapitalism and Literature: An Indian Case Study Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 03/04/24)

Description:
Objectives In the course of this seminar, you will - engage yourself with postcolonial theory on global health, biocapitalism, pharmocracy, stratified healthcare, and, more generally, with postcolonial medical humanities. - explore postcolonial perspectives on biotech-industries and global inequality, especially with regard to phenomena such as surrogacy, organ donation, pharmaceutical testing and patent trading. - analyse how these issues are negotiated in three Anglophone Indian literary texts. - discuss issues such as re-biologisation, species thinking and new universalisms in contemporary thinking and literary responses. - listen to two international guest lectures and participate in the opening of an international workshop. - develop individual research questions related to the seminar’s topic. Objectives In the course of this seminar, you will - engage yourself with postcolonial theory on global health, biocapitalism, pharmocracy, stratified healthcare, and, more generally, with postcolonial medical humanities. - explore postcolonial perspectives on biotech-industries and global inequality, especially with regard to phenomena such as surrogacy, organ donation, pharmaceutical testing and patent trading. - analyse how these issues are negotiated in three Anglophone Indian literary texts. - discuss issues such as re-biologisation, species thinking and new universalisms in contemporary thinking and literary responses. - listen to two international guest lectures and participate in the opening of an international workshop. - develop individual research questions related to the seminar’s topic.
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Julia Wurr
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.951 S Dual Language Development: Word Order Phenomena Friday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 05/04/24)

Description:
This class deals with the development of English as one of more languages in the broad sense, from birth or successively. Since bilinguals seldom use their languages in a balanced way, different dominance patterns arise and change over the lifespan, including the forgetting of the first language, referred to as language attrition - a phenomenon induced by the acquisition of an L2. We will look at various developmental settings, different language phenomena in the domain of syntax and consider the impact of cross-linguistic differences on attrition, acquisition and processing. In addition, we will deal with language acquisition theory and its research methods. By the end of the term students will be able to give an elaborate description of the phenomena of bilingualism in question and the factors of influence involved but also conduct a small research project themselves. This class deals with the development of English as one of more languages in the broad sense, from birth or successively. Since bilinguals seldom use their languages in a balanced way, different dominance patterns arise and change over the lifespan, including the forgetting of the first language, referred to as language attrition - a phenomenon induced by the acquisition of an L2. We will look at various developmental settings, different language phenomena in the domain of syntax and consider the impact of cross-linguistic differences on attrition, acquisition and processing. In addition, we will deal with language acquisition theory and its research methods. By the end of the term students will be able to give an elaborate description of the phenomena of bilingualism in question and the factors of influence involved but also conduct a small research project themselves.
Seminar 2 Dobrinka Genevska-Hanke
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.220 S Screening Europe: Representations of Europe in US-American Film and TV Dates on Friday, 26.04.2024 16:00 - 18:00, Friday, 31.05.2024 14:00 - 19:00, Monday, 08.07.2024 - Tuesday, 09.07.2024, Thursday, 11.07.2024 09:00 - 14:00, Location: A01 0-010 a, A05 1-159
Description:
Seminar - Lea Brenningmeyer
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.602 Ü Begleitveranstaltung für TutorInnen der Anglistik/ Amerikanistik: Fachdidaktik The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
miscellaneous - Christian Kramer, M.A., (he/him)
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.070 Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Lands Down Under Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.078 Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: American history, society and culture Friday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 05/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.02.043 SÜ Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Friday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 05/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Rebecca Käpernick, M.A.
  • Bachelor
3.02.308 KO Anglistisches-Amerikanistisches Forschungskolloquium Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Master
3.02.029 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 17/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dobrinka Genevska-Hanke
  • Bachelor
3.02.180 S Non-native speech perception Friday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 05/04/24)

Description:
Seminar 2 Stephanie Kaucke, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.100 Ü Spoken English: Food, glorious food Monday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.079 Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: The Melting Pot and the Salad Bowl Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dylan Rhea Rush
  • Bachelor
3.02.076 Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: British culture and society Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. David William West
  • Bachelor
3.02.301 KO Abschlusskolloquium: BA, MEd, DoktorandInnen Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.111 Ü Written English: From Appalachia to Alaska Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 15/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dylan Rhea Rush
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.998 Multiple Imaginations: Germany's Pasts and Presents – Part 1: Colonialism and Migration Dates on Friday, 03.05.2024 16:00 - 20:00, Saturday, 04.05.2024 - Sunday, 05.05.2024 10:00 - 19:00, Location: A05 1-160, A01 0-010 a, ((Deutsches Auswandererhaus Bremerhaven))
Description:
In this seminar, we will work on different narratives about and representations of what is imagined – in different times and under different (political, social, economic) circumstances – as ‘Germany’. We will explore what ‘Germany’ supposedly is and gain a deeper understanding of it. With a cultural studies perspective we will look at what and who is represented by whom as ‘German(y)’, who and what is excluded by the narratives, what the specific circumstances for specific narratives are, and which counter-narratives can be found. The aim of the seminar is not to study what is called ‘Germany’ or ‘Europe’ but to learn about representation and perspectives of (multiple) self-imaginations, how they are constructed in different narratives and which functions these imaginations serve. In the context of this seminar, we do a joint study trip to the Auswandererhaus in Bremerhaven to explore different narratives and representations about Germany’s past and present. With a selection of texts and short films we will examine issues of exclusion and inclusion, and their implications. In this seminar, we will work on different narratives about and representations of what is imagined – in different times and under different (political, social, economic) circumstances – as ‘Germany’. We will explore what ‘Germany’ supposedly is and gain a deeper understanding of it. With a cultural studies perspective we will look at what and who is represented by whom as ‘German(y)’, who and what is excluded by the narratives, what the specific circumstances for specific narratives are, and which counter-narratives can be found. The aim of the seminar is not to study what is called ‘Germany’ or ‘Europe’ but to learn about representation and perspectives of (multiple) self-imaginations, how they are constructed in different narratives and which functions these imaginations serve. In the context of this seminar, we do a joint study trip to the Auswandererhaus in Bremerhaven to explore different narratives and representations about Germany’s past and present. With a selection of texts and short films we will examine issues of exclusion and inclusion, and their implications.
Seminar - Sunday Omwenyeke
  • Master
3.02.402 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Writing in the Classroom Wednesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 17/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dylan Rhea Rush
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.190 S Beginning Language Learners Monday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.483 S Teaching Literature in the Inclusive EFL Classroom Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
Teaching literature in the EFL Classroom Amongst the current generation of teaching professionals, the question whether literature – both with a capital and a small `l´- should be used in the EFL classroom is usually answered with a resounding “yes!”. For years critics of the competence-based approach have been calling for literature to be re-established as a means of fostering an education that goes beyond a mere acquisition of a certain skill set. In our digital age the number of literary texts available online as well as the products emerging from the communication between readers, texts and authors open up new types of literary discourse and expression transcending age, nationality and educational background. On the other hand, future teachers of English are bound to come across restrictions regarding their choice of literary works as well as the topics connected to them. German Abitur exams in particular require close scrutiny of the curriculum. Set texts and a variety of linguistic and analytical skills will be required to meet the assessment standards stipulated by the Ministry of Education. From primary school through to the final years of secondary school and Abitur-level both extensive reading of literary texts as well as reading with a view of composing a piece of writing are expected to be fostered systematically. The seminar aims at providing an overview of different literary texts, approaches and methods viable in the EFL classroom. Starting with visualisation techniques, story telling, scenic interpretation and creative writing participants are expected to get actively involved in classes by creating their own literary products and exchanging ideas about the viability of different didactic approaches. Against the backdrop of current research in Didactics, participants are expected to analyse teaching and learning materials as well as (excerpts from) current textbooks for various age groups. Different approaches towards teaching literature will be explored. The development of units of work and lesson plans will be informed by relevant theories of language learning and teaching and can be critically applied to a selection of tasks, resources and ideas for projects connected to teaching literature. Lesson planning and the analysis of lessons involves • realistic target setting, • allowing for differentiation, • an appropriate choice of materials and media • as well as devising appropriate assessment strategies. Schemes of work submitted by students will be put under close scrutiny by peers and the lecturer in order to determine their viability in the classroom. Ideally, concepts and strategies will be put into practice during subsequent internships. As regards the submission of coursework as part of your final assessment, all participants are required to hand in two parts of a portfolio, thus showing their ability to plan and reflect on lessons and schemes of work or tasks. The first assessment is scheduled to take place ON CAMPUS on 14th May 2024 . Make sure to be available! Teaching literature in the EFL Classroom Amongst the current generation of teaching professionals, the question whether literature – both with a capital and a small `l´- should be used in the EFL classroom is usually answered with a resounding “yes!”. For years critics of the competence-based approach have been calling for literature to be re-established as a means of fostering an education that goes beyond a mere acquisition of a certain skill set. In our digital age the number of literary texts available online as well as the products emerging from the communication between readers, texts and authors open up new types of literary discourse and expression transcending age, nationality and educational background. On the other hand, future teachers of English are bound to come across restrictions regarding their choice of literary works as well as the topics connected to them. German Abitur exams in particular require close scrutiny of the curriculum. Set texts and a variety of linguistic and analytical skills will be required to meet the assessment standards stipulated by the Ministry of Education. From primary school through to the final years of secondary school and Abitur-level both extensive reading of literary texts as well as reading with a view of composing a piece of writing are expected to be fostered systematically. The seminar aims at providing an overview of different literary texts, approaches and methods viable in the EFL classroom. Starting with visualisation techniques, story telling, scenic interpretation and creative writing participants are expected to get actively involved in classes by creating their own literary products and exchanging ideas about the viability of different didactic approaches. Against the backdrop of current research in Didactics, participants are expected to analyse teaching and learning materials as well as (excerpts from) current textbooks for various age groups. Different approaches towards teaching literature will be explored. The development of units of work and lesson plans will be informed by relevant theories of language learning and teaching and can be critically applied to a selection of tasks, resources and ideas for projects connected to teaching literature. Lesson planning and the analysis of lessons involves • realistic target setting, • allowing for differentiation, • an appropriate choice of materials and media • as well as devising appropriate assessment strategies. Schemes of work submitted by students will be put under close scrutiny by peers and the lecturer in order to determine their viability in the classroom. Ideally, concepts and strategies will be put into practice during subsequent internships. As regards the submission of coursework as part of your final assessment, all participants are required to hand in two parts of a portfolio, thus showing their ability to plan and reflect on lessons and schemes of work or tasks. The first assessment is scheduled to take place ON CAMPUS on 14th May 2024 . Make sure to be available!
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.082 Compulsory Stay Abroad [Anglistik/Amerikanistik] Dates on Wednesday, 08.11.2023, Wednesday, 29.11.2023, Wednesday, 17.01.2024, Wednesday, 24.01.2024, Wednesday, 17.04.2024, Wednesday, 22.05.2024, Wednesday, 03.07.2024 13:30 - 14:30
Description:
miscellaneous - Lauren Freede
Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.02.041 SÜ Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
3.02.077 Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: American history, society and culture Friday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 05/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.02.193 S Teaching and Learning in the Diversity-sensitive EFL Classroom (Blockveranstaltung) Dates on Friday, 28.06.2024 - Saturday, 29.06.2024, Friday, 05.07.2024 - Saturday, 06.07.2024 09:00 - 16:00, Location: V03 0-C001, A01 0-005
Description:
Plurilingual (and pluricultural) competences are defined by the Education Policy Division of the Council of Europe (2018) as the ability to critically reflect and strategically use linguistic and cultural resources and knowledge across languages in order to successfully manage intercultural communication as well as life-long (language) learning. Foreign language teaching and thus foreign language teachers play a pivotal role in fostering plurilingual and pluricultural education. In this seminar we are going to operationalize plurilingual and pluricultural competence for foreign language learning contexts in relation to relevant European and German education policy documents such as the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages and Cultures (2001) and its companion volume (2018/2020), the KMK standards and the English curricula for Lower Saxony as well as other orientational frameworks such as the Framework for Pluralistic Approaches to Languages and Cultures (2009); we will discuss relevant theoretical concepts such as translanguaging (see García, 2009, 2013), (functional) mono-/multi- and plurilingualism, linguistic repertoire and English as a multilingua franca; and discuss ways of implementation of pluralistic/plurilingual approaches in foreign language classrooms such as mediation, intercomprehension and language portraits. This course’s assessment requirement and formats will be discussed in the first session. Key Words: plurilingualism, multilingualism, translanguaging, plurilingual competence, English as a Foreign Language, English as multilingua franca, intercomprehension, mediation, language learning/teaching, learner empowerment, Plurilingual (and pluricultural) competences are defined by the Education Policy Division of the Council of Europe (2018) as the ability to critically reflect and strategically use linguistic and cultural resources and knowledge across languages in order to successfully manage intercultural communication as well as life-long (language) learning. Foreign language teaching and thus foreign language teachers play a pivotal role in fostering plurilingual and pluricultural education. In this seminar we are going to operationalize plurilingual and pluricultural competence for foreign language learning contexts in relation to relevant European and German education policy documents such as the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages and Cultures (2001) and its companion volume (2018/2020), the KMK standards and the English curricula for Lower Saxony as well as other orientational frameworks such as the Framework for Pluralistic Approaches to Languages and Cultures (2009); we will discuss relevant theoretical concepts such as translanguaging (see García, 2009, 2013), (functional) mono-/multi- and plurilingualism, linguistic repertoire and English as a multilingua franca; and discuss ways of implementation of pluralistic/plurilingual approaches in foreign language classrooms such as mediation, intercomprehension and language portraits. This course’s assessment requirement and formats will be discussed in the first session. Key Words: plurilingualism, multilingualism, translanguaging, plurilingual competence, English as a Foreign Language, English as multilingua franca, intercomprehension, mediation, language learning/teaching, learner empowerment,
Seminar - Dr. Jana Oldendörp
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.210 Informationen zum Kombinationsmodul The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
miscellaneous - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.072 Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Lands Down Under Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.481 S Methodology in ELT Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Master of Education
3.02.170 S Introduction to Old English Wednesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 03/04/24)

Description:
“Hwæt sceolan we drinkan?”, what looks like an odd mixture of English and German is actually correct English – just more or less 1300 years old. One can still rather easily recognize the interrogative pronoun “what” only that the “hw” is nowadays reversed. “Sceolan” is probably a little hard to decipher at first glance, however at least for German natives it should – especially in combination with the last word of the question – be quickly identifiable as the equivalent to Modern English “shall” (or sollen – in OE the “sc” was pronounced as “sh”). The fellow who phrased this particular question therefore spoke perfect (Old) English, and yet how come that it looks more like a heavy German dialect than proper English? This issue will be one of the leading questions for this seminar. Where did the English language come from? Why is it even called English? Where did the languages before English go? Was there something like an “Old English period”? To answer those (and other questions) a period of language history lasting around 800 years will be examined. The focus will thereby not only lay with understanding the basics of Old English spelling, phonology and surface structure, but also in identifying key concepts of language contact and language change and how they have left traces within the everyday language we use. “Hwæt sceolan we drinkan?”, what looks like an odd mixture of English and German is actually correct English – just more or less 1300 years old. One can still rather easily recognize the interrogative pronoun “what” only that the “hw” is nowadays reversed. “Sceolan” is probably a little hard to decipher at first glance, however at least for German natives it should – especially in combination with the last word of the question – be quickly identifiable as the equivalent to Modern English “shall” (or sollen – in OE the “sc” was pronounced as “sh”). The fellow who phrased this particular question therefore spoke perfect (Old) English, and yet how come that it looks more like a heavy German dialect than proper English? This issue will be one of the leading questions for this seminar. Where did the English language come from? Why is it even called English? Where did the languages before English go? Was there something like an “Old English period”? To answer those (and other questions) a period of language history lasting around 800 years will be examined. The focus will thereby not only lay with understanding the basics of Old English spelling, phonology and surface structure, but also in identifying key concepts of language contact and language change and how they have left traces within the everyday language we use.
Seminar 2 Moss Bohrer, (they/them)
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.400 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Working with grammar and vocabulary Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.510 Ü Betreuung des Praxisblocks vor Ort (HR) im Unterrichtsfach Englisch The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
This course aims at widening your planning and teaching skills as a reflective practitioner. In a school environment you are going to put your knowledge and previous teaching expertise to the test by checking its viability in a real-life classroom. Please invite me for teaching observations at the earliest opportunity. For a supervised lesson observation you will be required to submit a lesson plan and be prepared to discuss lesson outcomes afterwards. The aim is to make the most of your field experience. This course aims at widening your planning and teaching skills as a reflective practitioner. In a school environment you are going to put your knowledge and previous teaching expertise to the test by checking its viability in a real-life classroom. Please invite me for teaching observations at the earliest opportunity. For a supervised lesson observation you will be required to submit a lesson plan and be prepared to discuss lesson outcomes afterwards. The aim is to make the most of your field experience.
Exercises - Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.307 KO New Research on English Literatures and Cultures Wednesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 03/04/24)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.971 S Narratives and Cultural Difference: Fiction and Other Cultural Narratives from South Asia Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 03/04/24)

Description:
In this course we will compare a novel (Amitav Ghosh's The Hungry Tide, 2004) to a range of shorter narratives set in the same region in India drawing on other narrative traditions than the realist novel. We will discuss and examine similarities and differences between various forms and formats of narrative, gaining some insight into the specific characteristics and richness of this particular region of India, as well as debating the cultural place of narrative and the perspectives for a 'cultural narratology'. Participants should purchase and read the following text as early as possible, since this will be analysed first: Amitav Ghosh, The Hungry Tide, London: HarperCollins / Borough Press, 2004. Information on the additional shorter text will follow in due course. Some shorter excerpts will be provided via Stud.IP. (The novel is locally available.) Please note that this course will be complemented by optional complementary units offered by two guest instructors from the IIT Kharagpur in West Bengal (In order to fit into the time schedules of many students, these units have been scheduled for Fri May 17 and May 31 (14-18 h) and Sat June 1 (10-18 h). The units cover a similar set of texts as our seminar, but from a complementary angle. Participation in the complementary units is not a requirement for taking the seminar, but MA English Students can elect to obtain their 3 KP for the “Project” in the context of these complementary units. Participation will also be open to students who do not participate in this course, and will be a great opportunity for gaining additional international perspectives on the study of English. The full course schedule will be presented in the first meeting. Credit for ang971 and 972 is based on an oral input and a shorter term paper (Referat mit Ausarbeitung) (6 KP or 9 KP respectively) Credit for ang973, for students who are doing the MA English Studies, requires an additional project (3KP) Students with other aims in this course please consult me individually. In this course we will compare a novel (Amitav Ghosh's The Hungry Tide, 2004) to a range of shorter narratives set in the same region in India drawing on other narrative traditions than the realist novel. We will discuss and examine similarities and differences between various forms and formats of narrative, gaining some insight into the specific characteristics and richness of this particular region of India, as well as debating the cultural place of narrative and the perspectives for a 'cultural narratology'. Participants should purchase and read the following text as early as possible, since this will be analysed first: Amitav Ghosh, The Hungry Tide, London: HarperCollins / Borough Press, 2004. Information on the additional shorter text will follow in due course. Some shorter excerpts will be provided via Stud.IP. (The novel is locally available.) Please note that this course will be complemented by optional complementary units offered by two guest instructors from the IIT Kharagpur in West Bengal (In order to fit into the time schedules of many students, these units have been scheduled for Fri May 17 and May 31 (14-18 h) and Sat June 1 (10-18 h). The units cover a similar set of texts as our seminar, but from a complementary angle. Participation in the complementary units is not a requirement for taking the seminar, but MA English Students can elect to obtain their 3 KP for the “Project” in the context of these complementary units. Participation will also be open to students who do not participate in this course, and will be a great opportunity for gaining additional international perspectives on the study of English. The full course schedule will be presented in the first meeting. Credit for ang971 and 972 is based on an oral input and a shorter term paper (Referat mit Ausarbeitung) (6 KP or 9 KP respectively) Credit for ang973, for students who are doing the MA English Studies, requires an additional project (3KP) Students with other aims in this course please consult me individually.
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.020 V Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 03/04/24), Location: A14 1-101 (Hörsaal 1)
Dates on Wednesday, 10.07.2024 11:00 - 12:00, Location: A14 1-102 (Hörsaal 2), A14 1-101 (Hörsaal 1)

Description:
Lecture 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.027 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 15/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dobrinka Genevska-Hanke
  • Bachelor
3.02.996 S Cultural Theory for MA Students: Digital Media and AI: Histories, Concepts, Approaches Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
The seminar explores theoretical perspectives on digital media and technologies, focusing on artificial intelligence. It makes students familiar with different cultural studies-based concepts of and approaches to digital media and AI. Students will apply these concepts and approaches to examples of their own choice and will also be given the opportunity to create a podcast in cooperation with the Kulturbüro of the city of Oldenburg. Course requirements: - Regular attendance & active participation (e.g. reading assignments, in-class discussions) - Paper on the basis of a presentation (“Referat und schriftliche Ausarbeitung”, c. 12-15 pp.) or “Hausarbeit” (15-20pp.) due September 15th 2024. As an alternative, you can also take part in preparing two podcast-episodes for the “Digitalog” produced by the ‘Oldenburger Kulturbüro’, one of which will be recorded live on June 6. The seminar explores theoretical perspectives on digital media and technologies, focusing on artificial intelligence. It makes students familiar with different cultural studies-based concepts of and approaches to digital media and AI. Students will apply these concepts and approaches to examples of their own choice and will also be given the opportunity to create a podcast in cooperation with the Kulturbüro of the city of Oldenburg. Course requirements: - Regular attendance & active participation (e.g. reading assignments, in-class discussions) - Paper on the basis of a presentation (“Referat und schriftliche Ausarbeitung”, c. 12-15 pp.) or “Hausarbeit” (15-20pp.) due September 15th 2024. As an alternative, you can also take part in preparing two podcast-episodes for the “Digitalog” produced by the ‘Oldenburger Kulturbüro’, one of which will be recorded live on June 6.
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
  • Master
3.02.401 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Error Correction Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 10/04/24)
Dates on Friday, 12.07.2024 16:00 - 17:00

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.080 Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: The Melting Pot and the Salad Bowl Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dylan Rhea Rush
  • Bachelor
3.02.071 Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Lands Down Under Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.045 SÜ Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Priv.-Doz. Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
3.02.311 KO Doing Research in Didactics Monday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

Description:
PLEASE NOTE THAT IN THIS COURSE, THERE IS ONLY A LIMITED NUMBER OF PLACES FOR BA / MA CANDIDATES! HENCE, IT IS IMPERATIVE FOR PARTICIPANTS TO LIAISE WITH THE LECTURER PRIOR TO REGISTRATION! This course is designed for students preparing to write their final thesis (BA or MA) in the field of Didactics. Looking for suitable and, above all, viable topics, presenting first ideas and subsequently coming up with a plan on how to carry out your actual research will be at the centre of the preparatory process. Candidates will be required to submit and present different types of documents, e.g. literature overview, research proposal, abstract, etc. You will be working independently outside class, preparing findings to peers and supervisors on a regular basis. Standards of academic research and writing will be discussed in plenary sessions. Students are expected to use feedback constructively and thus gradually commit to a final version of their research project. PLEASE NOTE THAT IN THIS COURSE, THERE IS ONLY A LIMITED NUMBER OF PLACES FOR BA / MA CANDIDATES! HENCE, IT IS IMPERATIVE FOR PARTICIPANTS TO LIAISE WITH THE LECTURER PRIOR TO REGISTRATION! This course is designed for students preparing to write their final thesis (BA or MA) in the field of Didactics. Looking for suitable and, above all, viable topics, presenting first ideas and subsequently coming up with a plan on how to carry out your actual research will be at the centre of the preparatory process. Candidates will be required to submit and present different types of documents, e.g. literature overview, research proposal, abstract, etc. You will be working independently outside class, preparing findings to peers and supervisors on a regular basis. Standards of academic research and writing will be discussed in plenary sessions. Students are expected to use feedback constructively and thus gradually commit to a final version of their research project.
Colloquium 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.313 KO: Research Colloquium in Anglophone Literary and Cultural Studies Wednesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 03/04/24)

Description:
COURSE DESCRIPTION AND GOALS: This colloquium is designed to support students currently planning or already undertaking research in their Recherchemodul or for their Bachelor, Master or PhD thesis. The course will start by providing guidance on how to develop and systematise your ideas, prepare a research proposal, plan your research and writing process, and improve your academic writing skills. We will then identify theoretical approaches, concepts and texts that are particularly relevant for participants’ research projects, do some reading and discussion in these theoretical areas, and test ways in which these could be made productive for the projects in hand. You will then get the opportunity to present your projects (via an overview and, if desired, a draft chapter) to the class in a more extended manner (ideally 1 session per project), discuss them with classmates and the course teacher, and get feedback and advice. Learning about, and being asked to discuss, the projects of others will also give you valuable insights into subject areas you may not have studied before, broadening your general knowledge and intellectual horizons in a way that is sure to benefit your future studies and careers. SET TEXTS: All texts will be made available via our online course platform Stud.IP. COURSE DESCRIPTION AND GOALS: This colloquium is designed to support students currently planning or already undertaking research in their Recherchemodul or for their Bachelor, Master or PhD thesis. The course will start by providing guidance on how to develop and systematise your ideas, prepare a research proposal, plan your research and writing process, and improve your academic writing skills. We will then identify theoretical approaches, concepts and texts that are particularly relevant for participants’ research projects, do some reading and discussion in these theoretical areas, and test ways in which these could be made productive for the projects in hand. You will then get the opportunity to present your projects (via an overview and, if desired, a draft chapter) to the class in a more extended manner (ideally 1 session per project), discuss them with classmates and the course teacher, and get feedback and advice. Learning about, and being asked to discuss, the projects of others will also give you valuable insights into subject areas you may not have studied before, broadening your general knowledge and intellectual horizons in a way that is sure to benefit your future studies and careers. SET TEXTS: All texts will be made available via our online course platform Stud.IP.
Colloquium 2 PD Dr. Silke Stroh
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.131 S Multiculture beyond the Metropoles: Writing the Rural in Black and Asian British Literature Friday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 05/04/24)

Description:
COURSE DESCRIPTION AND GOALS: Black and Asian British literature is a vibrant and highly dynamic field of cultural production which, in recent decades has also become a well-established and popular topic in universities and schools. But so far, attention to British multicultural spaces has mainly focused on a few large urban centres in and around London, Leeds or Manchester. Partly, this makes sense, because these places are indeed major diversity hubs. But there are people of colour in all corners of the UK, even in small and supposedly remote villages, and these non-metropolitan voices are often overlooked. Even where this oversight is unintentional, it implies that diversity is an anomaly, limited to a few big cities, while the rest of the country is still seen as a quintessentially white space. By contrast, this seminar looks beyond the big cities and examines texts from Black and Asian British literature (incl. novels for children and adults, poetry and drama, mainly from the last 20 years) that decidedly engage with rural spaces, inscribing various diasporic presences and multicultural connections into places where they might not, at first, be expected. This complicates conventional concepts of national and regional identity, diasporicity, city and country, tradition, (post)modernity and progress, to give a more nuanced picture of British diversity in the 21st century. Depending on student interests, we may also spend a little time reflecting on how such literary texts, and the issues they raise, can be included in EFL school-teaching. SET TEXTS: One of our set texts is Leila Aboulela’s novel Bird Summons (1st publ. 2019); this book should be purchased in advance (no prescribed edition). The other set texts (excerpts from other longer texts, whole texts of shorter works like poems, etc.) will be made available via our online course platform Stud.IP. COURSEWORK, CREDITS AND ASSIGNMENTS: Requirements for passing this course and acquiring credits are: 1) Regular attendance & active participation 2) 1 graded assignment / Prüfungsleistung. In this course, this takes the form of a presentation (c.15–30 min.) with subsequent write-up (c.10 pp.) COURSE DESCRIPTION AND GOALS: Black and Asian British literature is a vibrant and highly dynamic field of cultural production which, in recent decades has also become a well-established and popular topic in universities and schools. But so far, attention to British multicultural spaces has mainly focused on a few large urban centres in and around London, Leeds or Manchester. Partly, this makes sense, because these places are indeed major diversity hubs. But there are people of colour in all corners of the UK, even in small and supposedly remote villages, and these non-metropolitan voices are often overlooked. Even where this oversight is unintentional, it implies that diversity is an anomaly, limited to a few big cities, while the rest of the country is still seen as a quintessentially white space. By contrast, this seminar looks beyond the big cities and examines texts from Black and Asian British literature (incl. novels for children and adults, poetry and drama, mainly from the last 20 years) that decidedly engage with rural spaces, inscribing various diasporic presences and multicultural connections into places where they might not, at first, be expected. This complicates conventional concepts of national and regional identity, diasporicity, city and country, tradition, (post)modernity and progress, to give a more nuanced picture of British diversity in the 21st century. Depending on student interests, we may also spend a little time reflecting on how such literary texts, and the issues they raise, can be included in EFL school-teaching. SET TEXTS: One of our set texts is Leila Aboulela’s novel Bird Summons (1st publ. 2019); this book should be purchased in advance (no prescribed edition). The other set texts (excerpts from other longer texts, whole texts of shorter works like poems, etc.) will be made available via our online course platform Stud.IP. COURSEWORK, CREDITS AND ASSIGNMENTS: Requirements for passing this course and acquiring credits are: 1) Regular attendance & active participation 2) 1 graded assignment / Prüfungsleistung. In this course, this takes the form of a presentation (c.15–30 min.) with subsequent write-up (c.10 pp.)
Seminar 2 PD Dr. Silke Stroh
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.055 Repetitorium: Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Friday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 05/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.02.021 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Monday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 15/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.302 KO Research Colloquium in Language Use, Variation and Change Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.990 S American Soundscapes Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)
Dates on Friday, 17.05.2024 12:00 - 15:00

Description:
The seminar explores the sonic dimension of US American cultures. It makes students familiar with different theoretical approaches to the study of sound and music studies, which will be used to analyze a variety of acoustic phenomena and practices, including sounds of the city, the sounds of nature, the significance of voice, the poetics and politics of silence, and, last but not least, different musical styles and genres and their social and political relevance. For the period of two weeks in May, the course will be taught by Prof. Dr. Thomas M. Kitts from St. John’s University, New York City, who will bring in his expertise of music and sounds of and in the Big Apple. Also, students will participate in the Annual Meeting of the German Association of American Studies (23-25 May), which will focus on the course’s topic. Course requirements: - Regular attendance & active participation (e.g. reading assignments, in-class discussions), including the block-session by Prof. Dr. Kitts - Participation in at least one panel of the GAAS Annual Meeting on “American Soundscapes” - Paper on the basis of a presentation (“Referat und schriftliche Ausarbeitung”, c. 12-15 pp.) due September 15th 2024. The seminar explores the sonic dimension of US American cultures. It makes students familiar with different theoretical approaches to the study of sound and music studies, which will be used to analyze a variety of acoustic phenomena and practices, including sounds of the city, the sounds of nature, the significance of voice, the poetics and politics of silence, and, last but not least, different musical styles and genres and their social and political relevance. For the period of two weeks in May, the course will be taught by Prof. Dr. Thomas M. Kitts from St. John’s University, New York City, who will bring in his expertise of music and sounds of and in the Big Apple. Also, students will participate in the Annual Meeting of the German Association of American Studies (23-25 May), which will focus on the course’s topic. Course requirements: - Regular attendance & active participation (e.g. reading assignments, in-class discussions), including the block-session by Prof. Dr. Kitts - Participation in at least one panel of the GAAS Annual Meeting on “American Soundscapes” - Paper on the basis of a presentation (“Referat und schriftliche Ausarbeitung”, c. 12-15 pp.) due September 15th 2024.
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.960 S American English Monday: 17:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

Description:
Seminar 3 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.171 S Interlanguage Pragmatics: Studying EFL Learners' Pragmatic Competence Monday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

Description:
“Hwæt sceolan we drinkan?”, what looks like an odd mixture of English and German is actually correct English – just more or less 1300 years old. One can still rather easily recognize the interrogative pronoun “what” only that the “hw” is nowadays reversed. “Sceolan” is probably a little hard to decipher at first glance, however at least for German natives it should – especially in combination with the last word of the question – be quickly identifiable as the equivalent to Modern English “shall” (or sollen – in OE the “sc” was pronounced as “sh”). The fellow who phrased this particular question therefore spoke perfect (Old) English, and yet how come that it looks more like a heavy German dialect than proper English? This issue will be one of the leading questions for this seminar. Where did the English language come from? Why is it even called English? Where did the languages before English go? Was there something like an “Old English period”? To answer those (and other questions) a period of language history lasting around 800 years will be examined. The focus will thereby not only lay with understanding the basics of Old English spelling, phonology and surface structure, but also in identifying key concepts of language contact and language change and how they have left traces within the everyday language we use. “Hwæt sceolan we drinkan?”, what looks like an odd mixture of English and German is actually correct English – just more or less 1300 years old. One can still rather easily recognize the interrogative pronoun “what” only that the “hw” is nowadays reversed. “Sceolan” is probably a little hard to decipher at first glance, however at least for German natives it should – especially in combination with the last word of the question – be quickly identifiable as the equivalent to Modern English “shall” (or sollen – in OE the “sc” was pronounced as “sh”). The fellow who phrased this particular question therefore spoke perfect (Old) English, and yet how come that it looks more like a heavy German dialect than proper English? This issue will be one of the leading questions for this seminar. Where did the English language come from? Why is it even called English? Where did the languages before English go? Was there something like an “Old English period”? To answer those (and other questions) a period of language history lasting around 800 years will be examined. The focus will thereby not only lay with understanding the basics of Old English spelling, phonology and surface structure, but also in identifying key concepts of language contact and language change and how they have left traces within the everyday language we use.
Seminar 2 Nils Rademacher
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.032 Ü Repetitorium: Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Monday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.104 Ü Spoken English: Urban life (WED) Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 24/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.160 S Issues in English Psycholinguistics Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 03/04/24)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Marcel Schlechtweg
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.073 Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: The Melting Pot and the Salad Bowl Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dylan Rhea Rush
  • Bachelor
3.02.112 Ü Written English: From Appalachia to Alaska Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 15/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dylan Rhea Rush
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.185 V Methods in Linguistics Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 03/04/24)

Description:
Lecture 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.024 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Monday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 15/04/24), Location: A14 1-113, A05 1-160, (online)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dobrinka Genevska-Hanke
  • Bachelor
3.02.074 Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: The Melting Pot and the Salad Bowl Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dylan Rhea Rush
  • Bachelor
3.02.042 SÜ Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Friday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 05/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.02.930 S World Englishes Monday: 14:00 - 17:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

Description:
Seminar 3 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.161 S English Phonology: Theoretical and Experimental Approaches Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
Seminar 2 Leah Klußmann
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.316 KO Research Colloquium in English Linguistics Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 05/04/24)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Dobrinka Genevska-Hanke
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.046 SÜ Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
3.02.086 Organisation and Supervision of Erasmus+ study abroad and internships [Anglistik/Amerikanistik] The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Exercises - Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.044 SÜ Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Priv.-Doz. Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
3.02.480 S Current Issues in ELT Monday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Master of Education
3.02.999 S Multiple Imaginations: Germany's Pasts and Presents Part 2: National Socialism and German Reunification Dates on Friday, 24.05.2024 16:00 - 20:00, Saturday, 25.05.2024 - Sunday, 26.05.2024 10:00 - 19:00
Description:
The second part of the seminar builds on the main themes of the first seminar on representations, imaginations, narratives and power relations (see announcement for Part 1 in December). The focus this weekend will be on the German culture of remembrance after the Second World War with regard to National Socialism and the so-called German re-unification. We will deal with the question of how the memory of National Socialism in general and voices of Jews and other persecutees and survivors have long been, and still are, warded off and repressed. Further, we will look at how, especially survivors and their descendants have fought for and established spaces of remembrance. With regard to re-unification, the question also arises as to which events/voices and contents are remembered and which are suppressed and why, in societal discourse. Also of interest is how denial is linked to anti-Semitism and racism and how other/counter narratives can challenge anti-Semitic and racist conditions and relations. Part of this seminar is an excursion to the submarine bunker "Valentin" in Bremen-Farge, which was built by forced labourers under National Socialism. In addition, we will use selected texts and films to engage in a conversation about remembrance culture and representations in the German context. It is possible to participate in this second part independent of participation in the first part in December although we recommend you participate in both. The second part of the seminar builds on the main themes of the first seminar on representations, imaginations, narratives and power relations (see announcement for Part 1 in December). The focus this weekend will be on the German culture of remembrance after the Second World War with regard to National Socialism and the so-called German re-unification. We will deal with the question of how the memory of National Socialism in general and voices of Jews and other persecutees and survivors have long been, and still are, warded off and repressed. Further, we will look at how, especially survivors and their descendants have fought for and established spaces of remembrance. With regard to re-unification, the question also arises as to which events/voices and contents are remembered and which are suppressed and why, in societal discourse. Also of interest is how denial is linked to anti-Semitism and racism and how other/counter narratives can challenge anti-Semitic and racist conditions and relations. Part of this seminar is an excursion to the submarine bunker "Valentin" in Bremen-Farge, which was built by forced labourers under National Socialism. In addition, we will use selected texts and films to engage in a conversation about remembrance culture and representations in the German context. It is possible to participate in this second part independent of participation in the first part in December although we recommend you participate in both.
Seminar - Dr. Tobias Linnemann
Sunday Omwenyeke
  • Master
3.02.026 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Monday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 15/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dobrinka Genevska-Hanke
  • Bachelor
3.02.521 Ü Begleitung und Nachbereitung der Praxisphase GHR 300 im Unterrichtsfach Englisch Dates on Friday, 01.03.2024, Friday, 15.03.2024, Friday, 12.04.2024, Friday, 26.04.2024, Friday, 17.05.2024, Friday, 31.05.2024, Friday, 14.06.2024 12:00 - 14:00, Monday, 24.06.2024 - Tuesday, 25.06.2024 08:00 - 16:00, Location: A05 0-056, A01 0-010 b, A01 0-009 (+1 more)
Description:
Exercises - Edeltraud Breiter
Alexandra Köhler
Christian Kramer, M.A., (he/him)
  • Master of Education
3.02.482 S Teaching Advanced EFL Students Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
This class aims at providing an overview of what teaching advanced EFL classes (B1-B2+) actually involves in terms of lesson preparation and assessment strategies. Using standardised tests as a starting point to sharpen one`s diagnostic skills, we shall then turn to different types of tasks designed to foster language learning and thus help pupils to reach a higher level on the CEFR scale. Due to the sheer scope of the various skills that need to be fostered in an average EFL classroom, we shall focus our attention on different learning and teaching materials in order to critically assess whether they are actually fit for purpose. Consequently, designing adequate worksheets, tests and online resources will be the next step in an effort to improve teaching skills and to develop proper units of work (rather than "spur of the moment" teaching). Criteria of successful EFL teaching - both from Germany and the UK - will be applied to all the products designed in class in order to enhance lesson planning expertise. As EFL teachers in Germany are expected to deliver the national (KMK standards) and the regional curriculum (KC Niedersachsen), a rigorous study of the documents in question is required. Against the backdrop of the Pandemic, opportunities and limits of digital EFL teaching will be examined. Relevant reference needs to be studied in order to work on an expert view on the issue. By the end of term participants are expected to -sit two in-class assessments in the course of the term -compose a 1500 word essay based on relevant literature -take part in classroom discourse by providing comments and results from academic reading -be able to critically examine lesson plans against the backdrop of the competence-based approach All these skills shall be demonstrated and displayed in a portfolio which will be awarded a final grade. The two in-class (and ON CAMPUS!!!) tests and the essay comprise said portfolio so that participants will receive their grade by the end of term. This class aims at providing an overview of what teaching advanced EFL classes (B1-B2+) actually involves in terms of lesson preparation and assessment strategies. Using standardised tests as a starting point to sharpen one`s diagnostic skills, we shall then turn to different types of tasks designed to foster language learning and thus help pupils to reach a higher level on the CEFR scale. Due to the sheer scope of the various skills that need to be fostered in an average EFL classroom, we shall focus our attention on different learning and teaching materials in order to critically assess whether they are actually fit for purpose. Consequently, designing adequate worksheets, tests and online resources will be the next step in an effort to improve teaching skills and to develop proper units of work (rather than "spur of the moment" teaching). Criteria of successful EFL teaching - both from Germany and the UK - will be applied to all the products designed in class in order to enhance lesson planning expertise. As EFL teachers in Germany are expected to deliver the national (KMK standards) and the regional curriculum (KC Niedersachsen), a rigorous study of the documents in question is required. Against the backdrop of the Pandemic, opportunities and limits of digital EFL teaching will be examined. Relevant reference needs to be studied in order to work on an expert view on the issue. By the end of term participants are expected to -sit two in-class assessments in the course of the term -compose a 1500 word essay based on relevant literature -take part in classroom discourse by providing comments and results from academic reading -be able to critically examine lesson plans against the backdrop of the competence-based approach All these skills shall be demonstrated and displayed in a portfolio which will be awarded a final grade. The two in-class (and ON CAMPUS!!!) tests and the essay comprise said portfolio so that participants will receive their grade by the end of term.
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.114 Ü Written English: Reimagining education (THUR) Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 25/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.002 Review: Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 03/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Christian Kramer, M.A., (he/him)
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.304 KO New Research in American Literary and Cultural Studies Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.102 Ü Spoken English: Social Issues in North America Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 19/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dylan Rhea Rush
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.310 DS Directed Studies Friday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 05/04/24)

Description:
miscellaneous 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.485 Prüfungsverwaltung: Module ang702 und ang713 im Fach Englisch The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Diese Stud.IP Veranstaltung wird für die digitale Prüfungsanmeldung und -verwaltung der Mastermodule ang702 (M.Ed. Grundschule) und ang713 (M.Ed. Haupt-/Realschule) verwendet. Studierende der entsprechenden Masterstudiengänge müssen sich in dem Semester eintragen, in dem Sie das Modul belegen. Die Anmeldung zur Prüfung ist nur über diese Veranstaltung möglich! Diese Stud.IP Veranstaltung wird für die digitale Prüfungsanmeldung und -verwaltung der Mastermodule ang702 (M.Ed. Grundschule) und ang713 (M.Ed. Haupt-/Realschule) verwendet. Studierende der entsprechenden Masterstudiengänge müssen sich in dem Semester eintragen, in dem Sie das Modul belegen. Die Anmeldung zur Prüfung ist nur über diese Veranstaltung möglich!
miscellaneous - Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
Christian Kramer, M.A., (he/him)
  • Master of Education
3.02.201 S Why literature (still) matters: Finding, adapting and using literary texts in the EFL Classroom Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.520 Ü Begleitung und Nachbereitung der Praxisphase GHR 300 im Unterrichtsfach Englisch Dates on Friday, 01.03.2024, Friday, 15.03.2024, Friday, 12.04.2024, Friday, 26.04.2024, Friday, 17.05.2024, Friday, 31.05.2024, Friday, 14.06.2024 08:00 - 10:00, Monday, 24.06.2024 - Tuesday, 25.06.2024 08:00 - 16:00, Location: V03 0-C001, A03 4-403
Description:
Exercises - Christian Kramer, M.A., (he/him)
Verena Weustermann
  • Master of Education
3.02.221 S Physics and Fiction Wednesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 03/04/24)
Dates on Wednesday, 29.05.2024, Wednesday, 26.06.2024 13:00 - 18:00

Description:
You can find a list of books to buy and our syllabus here: https://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/2024_AM_Physics_and_Fiction You can find a list of books to buy and our syllabus here: https://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/2024_AM_Physics_and_Fiction
Seminar 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
Priv.-Doz. Dr. Petra Groß, Ph.D.
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.050 SÜ Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 05/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Alena Cicholewski
  • Bachelor
3.02.410 Ü Academic Discourse: Media Translation Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 11/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.192 S Digital EFL Learning Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 04/04/24), Location: A01 0-007
Dates on Wednesday, 25.09.2024 10:00 - 12:00, Location: A01 0-006

Description:
It is undisputed that digitalization and digitization have become ever-present features of our daily life. As such, digital and social media as well as the processes and possibilities they enable – immediate and ever-ready access to a seemingly infinite (yet not always reliable) stream of information on any topic imaginable; simplified modes of communication and mobility; instantaneous availability of numerous tools, apps and services within a finger tap or swipe – are also an integral part of educational contexts that focus on foreign language learning and teaching. On the end of foreign language learners digital media and the competence(s) and skills to efficiently and intelligently use them form a relevant asset for their (professional) future lives in and of themselves and pose the potential to support and facilitate the learning of English as a foreign language. On the end of foreign language teachers digital media offer means to enhance and transform pretty much every stage of lesson planning and conduction: from mere substitution and augmentation of established forms of teaching to the modification and ultimately redefinition of task designs and classroom activities. Theoretically, this seminar offers insights into approaches that integrate communicative foreign language teaching/learning and blended/digital learning as well as relevant competence models as defined by educational policy documents from the European (e.g. Common European Framework of Reference + Companion Volume; European Framework for the Digital Competence of Educators) and national (KMK Bildungsstandards; Strategiepaper ‘Bildung in der digitalen Welt’) down to the federal (curricula for lower saxony for English as a foreign language) level. Practically, it offers the opportunity to work with various digital tools in the context of lesson planning and foreign language learning (e.g. courseware, ChatGPT, Kahoot, ONCOO, Quizzlet, classcraft, etc.). The seminar will profit from combining theoretically and practically informed perspectives on the topic and will include a workshop during which students will form groups to develop and present school form specific blended learning units with the outlook of those units being incorporated into future seminars. This course’s assessment requirements and formats will be explained in the first session. They can also be accessed on Stud.IP in the section course information. Key Words: digital competence, digital literacy, teaching & learning English as a foreign language, digital media, digitalization, tasked-based learning, flipped classrooms, blended learning, gamification, artificial intelligence It is undisputed that digitalization and digitization have become ever-present features of our daily life. As such, digital and social media as well as the processes and possibilities they enable – immediate and ever-ready access to a seemingly infinite (yet not always reliable) stream of information on any topic imaginable; simplified modes of communication and mobility; instantaneous availability of numerous tools, apps and services within a finger tap or swipe – are also an integral part of educational contexts that focus on foreign language learning and teaching. On the end of foreign language learners digital media and the competence(s) and skills to efficiently and intelligently use them form a relevant asset for their (professional) future lives in and of themselves and pose the potential to support and facilitate the learning of English as a foreign language. On the end of foreign language teachers digital media offer means to enhance and transform pretty much every stage of lesson planning and conduction: from mere substitution and augmentation of established forms of teaching to the modification and ultimately redefinition of task designs and classroom activities. Theoretically, this seminar offers insights into approaches that integrate communicative foreign language teaching/learning and blended/digital learning as well as relevant competence models as defined by educational policy documents from the European (e.g. Common European Framework of Reference + Companion Volume; European Framework for the Digital Competence of Educators) and national (KMK Bildungsstandards; Strategiepaper ‘Bildung in der digitalen Welt’) down to the federal (curricula for lower saxony for English as a foreign language) level. Practically, it offers the opportunity to work with various digital tools in the context of lesson planning and foreign language learning (e.g. courseware, ChatGPT, Kahoot, ONCOO, Quizzlet, classcraft, etc.). The seminar will profit from combining theoretically and practically informed perspectives on the topic and will include a workshop during which students will form groups to develop and present school form specific blended learning units with the outlook of those units being incorporated into future seminars. This course’s assessment requirements and formats will be explained in the first session. They can also be accessed on Stud.IP in the section course information. Key Words: digital competence, digital literacy, teaching & learning English as a foreign language, digital media, digitalization, tasked-based learning, flipped classrooms, blended learning, gamification, artificial intelligence
Seminar 2 Christian Kramer, M.A., (he/him)
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.140 S Australian Expedition Narratives Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
Some of the earliest documentary films, such as In the Land of the Head Hunters (1914) and Nanook of the North (1922), explore the relationship between human beings and their natural environments. Both Head Hunters and Nanook are also (pseudo-)scientific films, (purported) ethnographic studies of "primitive" peoples. As such, they demonstrate the close interconnection between science and motion pictures--indeed, motion pictures became important tools of scientific observation and inquiry practically as soon as they were discovered. In this seminar, we will explore ways in which documentary films frame (scientific) knowledge about nature, the environment, and humankind's varied relationships and entanglements with the natural world. In so doing, we will soon discover that films that seem to center on nature often say more about humans than the natural world they purport to represent. Films likely to be discussed (selection): Nanook of the North (1922) The Living Desert (1953) The Vanishing Prairie (1954) Life on Earth (1979) An Inconvenient Truth (2006) The National Parks: America's Best Idea (2009) Life (2009) Racing Extinction (2015) Anthropocene: The Human Epoch (2017) Some of the earliest documentary films, such as In the Land of the Head Hunters (1914) and Nanook of the North (1922), explore the relationship between human beings and their natural environments. Both Head Hunters and Nanook are also (pseudo-)scientific films, (purported) ethnographic studies of "primitive" peoples. As such, they demonstrate the close interconnection between science and motion pictures--indeed, motion pictures became important tools of scientific observation and inquiry practically as soon as they were discovered. In this seminar, we will explore ways in which documentary films frame (scientific) knowledge about nature, the environment, and humankind's varied relationships and entanglements with the natural world. In so doing, we will soon discover that films that seem to center on nature often say more about humans than the natural world they purport to represent. Films likely to be discussed (selection): Nanook of the North (1922) The Living Desert (1953) The Vanishing Prairie (1954) Life on Earth (1979) An Inconvenient Truth (2006) The National Parks: America's Best Idea (2009) Life (2009) Racing Extinction (2015) Anthropocene: The Human Epoch (2017)
Seminar 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.403 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Listening in the language classroom Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 24/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.047 SÜ Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 05/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
3.02.004 Review: Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Wednesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 03/04/24)

Description:
This voluntary revision course is designed to provide a systematic review of content the lecture ang 049 covers. By focusing on skills participants are expected to have aquired prior to the end-of-term testpaper, our sessions are designed to provide hands-on revision tasks and the opportunity to explore and discuss issues in EFL teaching from different angles. Your personal views and experiences will also be taken into account in order to create a comprehensive picture of your future role and skillset as EFL classroom practitioner. Teaching methods comprise -exercises and tasks, -group assignments, -short presentations among your peers. Learning materials will be provided. Intended Learning Outcomes: By the end of term, participants are expected to -be familiar with the content of lecture ang 049. -be able to tackle tasks applying the knowledge gained. -reflect on their own role as future EFL practitioner. Formative assessment methods due to voluntary basis of participation: -self & peer assessment -opportunity for individual coaching and tutoring at the end of each session Please note that the language used in this course is English! If the need arises, however, I am happy to discuss aspects in German, too. This voluntary revision course is designed to provide a systematic review of content the lecture ang 049 covers. By focusing on skills participants are expected to have aquired prior to the end-of-term testpaper, our sessions are designed to provide hands-on revision tasks and the opportunity to explore and discuss issues in EFL teaching from different angles. Your personal views and experiences will also be taken into account in order to create a comprehensive picture of your future role and skillset as EFL classroom practitioner. Teaching methods comprise -exercises and tasks, -group assignments, -short presentations among your peers. Learning materials will be provided. Intended Learning Outcomes: By the end of term, participants are expected to -be familiar with the content of lecture ang 049. -be able to tackle tasks applying the knowledge gained. -reflect on their own role as future EFL practitioner. Formative assessment methods due to voluntary basis of participation: -self & peer assessment -opportunity for individual coaching and tutoring at the end of each session Please note that the language used in this course is English! If the need arises, however, I am happy to discuss aspects in German, too.
Exercises 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.113 Ü Written English: Reimagining education (TUE) Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 23/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.950 S Experimental Perspectives on Contemporary English Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 03/04/24)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Marcel Schlechtweg
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.305 KO New Research in American Literary and Cultural Studies Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 03/04/24)

Description:
This course is open to all students who are preparing to write - or who are already in the process of writing - their BA and MA theses in American literary and cultural studies, as well as to students who want to do a research module ("Recherchemodul"). Students will hone their academic writings skills with the help of various written assignments, develop and work on an exposé, share and revise their work in progress. Requirements: Regular attendance to the scheduled sessions; completion of all writing assignments; development of an exposé; active participation in class discussions. This course is open to all students who are preparing to write - or who are already in the process of writing - their BA and MA theses in American literary and cultural studies, as well as to students who want to do a research module ("Recherchemodul"). Students will hone their academic writings skills with the help of various written assignments, develop and work on an exposé, share and revise their work in progress. Requirements: Regular attendance to the scheduled sessions; completion of all writing assignments; development of an exposé; active participation in class discussions.
Colloquium 2 Priv.-Doz. Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.141 S Murder, She Wrote: American Women Writers and Detective Fiction Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
This course studies American women writers’ contributions to detective fiction from their (Gothic) beginnings in the nineteenth century to Mary Roberts Rinehart's and Avery Howood's popular play "The Bat," which premiered on stage in 1920. Although the American authors that we will study are recognized in literary histories of the detective genre and crime fiction, many of their works have not been given as much scholarly attention as they deserve and await further in-depth interpretations and analyses, recovery work that students can undertake in their term paper projects. The course will focus on – but is not limited to – the ways in which American women writers narrate, represent, and comment on issues of gender, power, class, domesticity, vision, literature, and genre. We will study the following primary materials: • Detective fiction by Harriet Prescott Spofford: “In a Cellar” (1859); “Mr. Furbush” (1865); “In the Maguerriwock” (1868) [see Stud.IP] • Anna Katharine Green, The Leavenworth Case (1878). Please purchase the Penguin Classic edition, with an introduction by Michael Sims, 2010. • Mary Roberts Rinehart and Avery Hopwood, The Bat (1945). The play is in the public domain and can be downloaded here: https://web.archive.org/web/20170412143959/http://digital.library.pitt.edu/u/ulsmanuscripts/pdf/31735037970435.pdf. This course studies American women writers’ contributions to detective fiction from their (Gothic) beginnings in the nineteenth century to Mary Roberts Rinehart's and Avery Howood's popular play "The Bat," which premiered on stage in 1920. Although the American authors that we will study are recognized in literary histories of the detective genre and crime fiction, many of their works have not been given as much scholarly attention as they deserve and await further in-depth interpretations and analyses, recovery work that students can undertake in their term paper projects. The course will focus on – but is not limited to – the ways in which American women writers narrate, represent, and comment on issues of gender, power, class, domesticity, vision, literature, and genre. We will study the following primary materials: • Detective fiction by Harriet Prescott Spofford: “In a Cellar” (1859); “Mr. Furbush” (1865); “In the Maguerriwock” (1868) [see Stud.IP] • Anna Katharine Green, The Leavenworth Case (1878). Please purchase the Penguin Classic edition, with an introduction by Michael Sims, 2010. • Mary Roberts Rinehart and Avery Hopwood, The Bat (1945). The play is in the public domain and can be downloaded here: https://web.archive.org/web/20170412143959/http://digital.library.pitt.edu/u/ulsmanuscripts/pdf/31735037970435.pdf.
Seminar 2 Priv.-Doz. Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.306 KO New Research on English Literatures and Cultures Friday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 05/04/24)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.315 KO Doing Research in Didactics/Begleitung und Nachbereitung Projektband (GHR300) im Fach Englisch Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
Dieser Kurs richtet sich an Studierende, die ihre Abschlussarbeit (B.A. oder M.Ed.) in der englischen Fremsprachendidaktik schreiben wollen sowie an Studierende in den Masterstudiengängen M.Ed. Grundschule und M.Ed. Haupt-/Realschule, die daran interessiert sind, ihr Forschungsprojekt (Projektband) im Rahmen des GHR Praxisblocks in der englischen Fremdsprachendidaktik abzuleisten. Der Kurs hat zum Ziel Studierende prozessbegleitend zu unterstützen: Von der Themenfindung und -ausschärfung über die Recherche bis hin zur Entwicklung und Operationalisierung passender Forschungsmethodologie. Es werden zudem beispielhafte Einblicke in verschiedene Formen der empirischen Datenerhebung, -verarbeitung und -auswertung gegeben. Bitte beachten Sie, dass der Kurs begrenzte Kapazitäten hat. Sofern angestrebt wird eine Abschlussarbeit zu schreiben, wird erwartet, dass vor Kursbeginn bereits ein Themenvorschlag (oder ggfs. auch mehrere Themenvorschläge) per E-Mail oder in einer Sprechstunde abgesprochen wird/werden. Im Rahmen des Projektbands wird ein Schwerpunkt auf Aktionsforschung gelegt mit dem Ziel mehrsprachigkeitssensible Formate lernzielförderlich in den eigenen Englischunterricht im Rahmen des GHR Praxisblocks zu integrieren. Dieser Kurs richtet sich an Studierende, die ihre Abschlussarbeit (B.A. oder M.Ed.) in der englischen Fremsprachendidaktik schreiben wollen sowie an Studierende in den Masterstudiengängen M.Ed. Grundschule und M.Ed. Haupt-/Realschule, die daran interessiert sind, ihr Forschungsprojekt (Projektband) im Rahmen des GHR Praxisblocks in der englischen Fremdsprachendidaktik abzuleisten. Der Kurs hat zum Ziel Studierende prozessbegleitend zu unterstützen: Von der Themenfindung und -ausschärfung über die Recherche bis hin zur Entwicklung und Operationalisierung passender Forschungsmethodologie. Es werden zudem beispielhafte Einblicke in verschiedene Formen der empirischen Datenerhebung, -verarbeitung und -auswertung gegeben. Bitte beachten Sie, dass der Kurs begrenzte Kapazitäten hat. Sofern angestrebt wird eine Abschlussarbeit zu schreiben, wird erwartet, dass vor Kursbeginn bereits ein Themenvorschlag (oder ggfs. auch mehrere Themenvorschläge) per E-Mail oder in einer Sprechstunde abgesprochen wird/werden. Im Rahmen des Projektbands wird ein Schwerpunkt auf Aktionsforschung gelegt mit dem Ziel mehrsprachigkeitssensible Formate lernzielförderlich in den eigenen Englischunterricht im Rahmen des GHR Praxisblocks zu integrieren.
Colloquium 2 Christian Kramer, M.A., (he/him)
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.049 SÜ Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 PD Dr. Silke Stroh
  • Bachelor
3.02.040 V Historical Backgrounds and Critical Concepts Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 04/04/24), Location: A11 1-101 (Hörsaal B)
Dates on Thursday, 04.07.2024 12:00 - 14:00, Location: V03 0-C002

Description:
Lecture 2 Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
Prof. Dr. Julia Wurr
  • Bachelor
3.02.028 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 17/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dobrinka Genevska-Hanke
  • Bachelor
3.02.103 Ü Spoken English: Urban life (MON) Monday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 22/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.101 Ü Spoken English: Social Issues in North America Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 18/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dylan Rhea Rush
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.404 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Listening in the language classroom Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 25/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.025 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 15/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dobrinka Genevska-Hanke
  • Bachelor
3.02.048 SÜ Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 PD Dr. Silke Stroh
  • Bachelor
3.02.151 S Scientists and Alien Life in Contemporary Fiction Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
Scientists and Aliens have been two of the major ingredients in the popular genre of science fiction in the twentieth century. In more recent fiction, the representation both of scientist characters of alien life have arguably taken on new qualities. They even take on a kind of urgency when placed in the context of discussions about the Anthropocene. Our seminar is set against the background of a wider development in literary writing and literary studies over the past few decades: At least since the turn of the twenty-first century, literary writing has incorporated elements from science fiction, and science fiction has moved much closer towards recognition as literary writing, than was traditionally the case, and literary scholarship has widely begun to take notice. Our seminar approaches some key aspects of such cross-over writing by focusing on two fairly recent novels, examining their representations of scientists and of alien life in connection with relevant traditions and current debates. The following texts will be covered: Jeff Vandermeer. Annihilation. London: HarperCollins / Fourth Estate, 2014. Peter Watts. Blindsight. New York: Tor, 2006. Additional shorter materials will also be included. Please purchase and read the two novels as early as possible. (Both are available locally, though Blindsight has a longer delivery span, so please order early). Participation as a rule requires an oral input as part of active participation. Credits for BA Anglistik based on “Referat mit Ausarbeitung” (6 KP). All students with different course goals or requirements, please contact me. Scientists and Aliens have been two of the major ingredients in the popular genre of science fiction in the twentieth century. In more recent fiction, the representation both of scientist characters of alien life have arguably taken on new qualities. They even take on a kind of urgency when placed in the context of discussions about the Anthropocene. Our seminar is set against the background of a wider development in literary writing and literary studies over the past few decades: At least since the turn of the twenty-first century, literary writing has incorporated elements from science fiction, and science fiction has moved much closer towards recognition as literary writing, than was traditionally the case, and literary scholarship has widely begun to take notice. Our seminar approaches some key aspects of such cross-over writing by focusing on two fairly recent novels, examining their representations of scientists and of alien life in connection with relevant traditions and current debates. The following texts will be covered: Jeff Vandermeer. Annihilation. London: HarperCollins / Fourth Estate, 2014. Peter Watts. Blindsight. New York: Tor, 2006. Additional shorter materials will also be included. Please purchase and read the two novels as early as possible. (Both are available locally, though Blindsight has a longer delivery span, so please order early). Participation as a rule requires an oral input as part of active participation. Credits for BA Anglistik based on “Referat mit Ausarbeitung” (6 KP). All students with different course goals or requirements, please contact me.
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.022 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 15/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.105 Ü Spoken English: Talking about Great Britain Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 16/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. David William West
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.511 Ü Betreuung des Praxisblocks vor Ort (GHR) im Unterrichtsfach Englisch The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Exercises - Edeltraud Breiter
  • Master of Education
3.02.202 S Media Literacy in ELT Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Birte Sause
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.023 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 15/04/24)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.005 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Tuesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 09/04/24)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Edda Hagemann
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.200 S Postcolonialism and Literature in ELT contexts Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

Description:
The seminar provides an overview of postcolonial storytelling and the concept of multiculturalism followed by an analysis of a variety of literary products ranging from the early 90s to the present. Questions of national identity will be covered as well as cultural, political and religious issues. Excerpts from novels but also chapters from textbooks, e.g. Year 7 will be analysed. London as a hub of the British multicultural experience will be explored in greater detail. Excerpts from selected texts comprise works by e.g. - Hanif Kureishi, The Buddha of Suburbia, 1990 - Hanif Kureishi, The Black Album, 1995 - Monica Ali, Brick Lane, 2000 Each text will be analysed and assessed with regard to its suitability for classroom use. Excerpts from textbook units along with the accompanying tasks and media will be critically examined. Additional material from a variety of sources will be collected, presented and prepared for classroom use. Task design will be practiced by providing motivating challenges for young adult readers and learners of English. London as a topic for younger learners exploring the postcolonial heritage will also be examined using current textbook chapters and abridged literary texts. Recent discussions on Britains colonial past and the "black-lives-matter" discussion will also be taken into account. Relevant reading in this field comprises e.g. -Akala, Natives. Race & Class in the Ruins of the Empire (2018) -Eddo-Lodge, R. Why I`m No Longer Talking to White People About Race (2018) -Hirsch, A., British. On Race, Identity and Belonging (2018) -Shukla, N. (Ed.) The Good Immigrant (2016) A special focus will be put on the experience of displacement and seeking refuge from the perspective of children (picture book “My Name is not Refugee”) respectively teenagers (“Refugee Boy”). Please note that details on the structure and focus of each class can be found at files. -On successful completion of this module, students should - be familiar with the British Empire and the literature emerging from the post-colonial experience -know about London`s significance for contemporary multicultural life -be able to explain the role of English in post-colonial storytelling -be able to analyse narrative texts reflecting the multicultural experience -be familiar with the content and interpretation of the texts dealt with in class -be able to assess the viability of select texts for classroom use -be aware of the rules and regulations the Core Curriculum in Lower Saxony stipulates for the topic -be able to critically assess literary products for teaching purposes and, if necessary, modify and edit them - provide tasks accompanying literary texts reflecting the multicultural experience Participants are expected to: - provide commentaries on topics discussed in class (“Aktive Teilnahme”) -submit samples of work (“Aktive Teilnahme”) -pass a test at the end of term. The seminar provides an overview of postcolonial storytelling and the concept of multiculturalism followed by an analysis of a variety of literary products ranging from the early 90s to the present. Questions of national identity will be covered as well as cultural, political and religious issues. Excerpts from novels but also chapters from textbooks, e.g. Year 7 will be analysed. London as a hub of the British multicultural experience will be explored in greater detail. Excerpts from selected texts comprise works by e.g. - Hanif Kureishi, The Buddha of Suburbia, 1990 - Hanif Kureishi, The Black Album, 1995 - Monica Ali, Brick Lane, 2000 Each text will be analysed and assessed with regard to its suitability for classroom use. Excerpts from textbook units along with the accompanying tasks and media will be critically examined. Additional material from a variety of sources will be collected, presented and prepared for classroom use. Task design will be practiced by providing motivating challenges for young adult readers and learners of English. London as a topic for younger learners exploring the postcolonial heritage will also be examined using current textbook chapters and abridged literary texts. Recent discussions on Britains colonial past and the "black-lives-matter" discussion will also be taken into account. Relevant reading in this field comprises e.g. -Akala, Natives. Race & Class in the Ruins of the Empire (2018) -Eddo-Lodge, R. Why I`m No Longer Talking to White People About Race (2018) -Hirsch, A., British. On Race, Identity and Belonging (2018) -Shukla, N. (Ed.) The Good Immigrant (2016) A special focus will be put on the experience of displacement and seeking refuge from the perspective of children (picture book “My Name is not Refugee”) respectively teenagers (“Refugee Boy”). Please note that details on the structure and focus of each class can be found at files. -On successful completion of this module, students should - be familiar with the British Empire and the literature emerging from the post-colonial experience -know about London`s significance for contemporary multicultural life -be able to explain the role of English in post-colonial storytelling -be able to analyse narrative texts reflecting the multicultural experience -be familiar with the content and interpretation of the texts dealt with in class -be able to assess the viability of select texts for classroom use -be aware of the rules and regulations the Core Curriculum in Lower Saxony stipulates for the topic -be able to critically assess literary products for teaching purposes and, if necessary, modify and edit them - provide tasks accompanying literary texts reflecting the multicultural experience Participants are expected to: - provide commentaries on topics discussed in class (“Aktive Teilnahme”) -submit samples of work (“Aktive Teilnahme”) -pass a test at the end of term.
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
114 Seminars

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