Stud.IP Uni Oldenburg
University of Oldenburg
19.08.2022 20:13:03
Veranstaltungsverzeichnis

Institute of English and American Studies Click here for PDF-Download

Winter semester 2022/2023 120 Seminars
VAK Course Number Title Type Lecture
Preliminary studies
Advanced courses
Practical course
Colloquium
Research group
Workgroup
Project group
Council conference
Internship
Language course
Subject didactics
Excursion
Tutorial
Committee
SWS Semester weekly hours Teachers Degree
3.02.950 S Phonetic Data Analysis Wednesday: 16:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Marcel Schlechtweg
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.028 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Monday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Nils Rademacher
  • Bachelor
3.02.101 Ü Spoken English Tuesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.026 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Tuesday: 14:15 - 15:45, fortnightly (from 25/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.502 Ü Vorbereitung auf das Fachpraktikum Englisch (Gym) Tuesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Erweiterungsfach
  • Master of Education
3.02.003 Review: Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Wednesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.005 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Tutorial - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.401 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Error Correction Wednesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.041 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Bachelor
3.02.220 S Titel folgt The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - Michal Musialowski
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.404 Ü English for Educational Purposes Thursday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.110 Ü Written English: Exploration and Expeditions Thursday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.104 Ü Spoken English Tuesday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.301 KO Abschlusskolloquium: BA, MEd, Projektband GHR 300, DoktorandInnen Tuesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.121 S Rewriting History: Historiographic Metafiction and the English Novel in the 1980s Wednesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.078 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Friday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
3.02.200 S Media Literacy in ELT The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - Dr. Birte Sause
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.060 TUT Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Tutorial - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.511 Ü Betreuung des Fachpraktikums Englisch vor Ort (Gym) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Exercises - Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.410 Ü Academic Discourse Wednesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.302 KO Research Colloquium in Language Use, Variation and Change Wednesday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.059 TUT Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Tutorial - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.079 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Wednesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.02.601 Ü Begleitveranstaltung für TutorInnen der Anglistik/ Amerikanistik: Linguistik/ Sprachwissenschaft The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
miscellaneous - Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.602 Ü Begleitveranstaltung für TutorInnen der Anglistik/ Amerikanistik: Fachdidaktik The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
miscellaneous - Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.114 Ü Written English Tuesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.190 S Beginning Language Learners Monday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.036 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Tutorial - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.047 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
3.02.930 S World Englishes Thursday: 14:15 - 16:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 3 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.505 Ü Vorbereitung auf das Forschungs- und Entwicklungspraktikum Fach Englisch (FEP) Thursday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Master of Education
3.02.994 S The Literary Marketplace for MA Students The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Master
3.02.058 TUT Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Tutorial - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.049 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Alena Cicholewski
  • Bachelor
3.02.025 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Tuesday: 14:15 - 15:45, fortnightly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.100 Ü Spoken English: Food, glorious food Thursday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.057 TUT Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Tutorial - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.201 S Multiculturalism and Literature Monday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.120 S Reading Moby-Dick in the Twenty-First Century Wednesday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
"Call me Ishmal"--even if you haven't read MOBY-DICK, you likely know it's opening line. MOBY-DICK is repeatedly listed among the great American novels (if not THE great American novel) and has been adapted in numerous media and has been referenced across popular culture. This seminar will consist of two main parts: in the first half (or, rather, two thirds) of the semester, we will dive into MOBY-DICK; in the final part of the semester, we will explore the continued presence of MOBY-DICK (and Moby Dick) in post-World War II (popular) culture. Accordingly, we will discuss various adaptations and dissect various cultural artifacts in which MOBY-DICK and/or Moby Dick play(s) a prominent role. This seminar will be online. It will operate in a hybrid fashion insofar as students will have the opportunity to participate live or asynchronously (students may also change their form of participation on a weekly basis). However, the first couple of weeks will be async-only, as students will make their way through MOBY-DICK. Tentative Schedule: Week 1: Seminar Overview (pre-recorded video) Weeks 2-4: Reading weeks (i.e., read MOBY-DICK; no meetings, but a variety of online tasks) Week 5: The American Whaling Industry in the Nineteenth Century Week 6: MOBY-DICK and America Week 7: (American) Romanticism Week 8: Down the Belly of the Whale Week 9: Energy and the Deep Blue Sea Weeks 10-14: I'll provide a selection of adaptations we could discuss--students will decide which ones we will discuss "Call me Ishmal"--even if you haven't read MOBY-DICK, you likely know it's opening line. MOBY-DICK is repeatedly listed among the great American novels (if not THE great American novel) and has been adapted in numerous media and has been referenced across popular culture. This seminar will consist of two main parts: in the first half (or, rather, two thirds) of the semester, we will dive into MOBY-DICK; in the final part of the semester, we will explore the continued presence of MOBY-DICK (and Moby Dick) in post-World War II (popular) culture. Accordingly, we will discuss various adaptations and dissect various cultural artifacts in which MOBY-DICK and/or Moby Dick play(s) a prominent role. This seminar will be online. It will operate in a hybrid fashion insofar as students will have the opportunity to participate live or asynchronously (students may also change their form of participation on a weekly basis). However, the first couple of weeks will be async-only, as students will make their way through MOBY-DICK. Tentative Schedule: Week 1: Seminar Overview (pre-recorded video) Weeks 2-4: Reading weeks (i.e., read MOBY-DICK; no meetings, but a variety of online tasks) Week 5: The American Whaling Industry in the Nineteenth Century Week 6: MOBY-DICK and America Week 7: (American) Romanticism Week 8: Down the Belly of the Whale Week 9: Energy and the Deep Blue Sea Weeks 10-14: I'll provide a selection of adaptations we could discuss--students will decide which ones we will discuss
Seminar 2 Dr. Michael Fuchs
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.046 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
3.02.312 KO Postcolonial Studies: Theories, Literatures and Media Wednesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Julia Wurr
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.210 Informationen zum Kombinationsmodul The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
miscellaneous - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.048 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 12:15 - 13:45, fortnightly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.02.043 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
3.02.020 V Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Wednesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Lecture 2 Prof. Dr. Marcel Schlechtweg
  • Bachelor
3.02.510 Ü Betreuung des Fachpraktikums Englisch vor Ort (Gym) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Exercises - Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.309 KO Research Colloquium in Language Use, Variation and Change Thursday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.075 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Tuesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
3.02.171 S Titel folgt The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
How can we convey meaning to a hearer successfully? How can a hearer understand what a speaker means? This course aims to provide the students with a holistic understanding of the differences between meaning in and out of context. Therefore, we are going to investigate the elusive line between semantics and pragmatics. Although this course introduces pragmatic theories, it nevertheless relies on practical examples of spoken language to show which areas of natural language these theories describe. In other words: The theories introduced in this course are all applicable to communicative situations we all are familiar with. How can we convey meaning to a hearer successfully? How can a hearer understand what a speaker means? This course aims to provide the students with a holistic understanding of the differences between meaning in and out of context. Therefore, we are going to investigate the elusive line between semantics and pragmatics. Although this course introduces pragmatic theories, it nevertheless relies on practical examples of spoken language to show which areas of natural language these theories describe. In other words: The theories introduced in this course are all applicable to communicative situations we all are familiar with.
Seminar - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.500 Ü Vorbereitung der Praxisphase GHR 300 im Unterrichtsfach Englisch Friday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 in Bearbeitung
Kerstin Weerts
Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Master of Education
3.02.160 S Acquiring Language with a Learning Bias Monday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 2 Stephanie Kaucke, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.970 S Me Too: Revisionist Mythmaking in the Fiction of Margaret Atwood, Madeleine Miller, and Pat Barker Tuesday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.185 V Research Methods in Linguistics Thursday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Lecture 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.480 S Current Issues in ELT Monday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Master of Education
3.02.080 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Thursday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.02.042 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.02.029 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Monday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Nils Rademacher
  • Bachelor
3.02.402 Ü English for Educational Purposes Wednesday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.221 S Britain in the 2020s: looking for a role between Europe and the Anglosphere Thursday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Richard Stinshoff
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.307 KO New Research on English Literatures and Cultures Tuesday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.306 KO New Research on English Literatures and Cultures Tuesday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.076 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Tuesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
3.02.140 S Communicating Science - Engaging (with) Nature: Film & Television Documentaries and the Environment Tuesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Some of the earliest documentary films, such as In the Land of the Head Hunters (1914) and Nanook of the North (1922), explore the relationship between human beings and their natural environments. Both Head Hunters and Nanook are also (pseudo-)scientific films, (purported) ethnographic studies of "primitive" peoples. As such, they demonstrate the close interconnection between science and motion pictures--indeed, motion pictures became important tools of scientific observation and inquiry practically as soon as they were discovered. In this seminar, we will explore ways in which documentary films frame (scientific) knowledge about nature, the environment, and humankind's varied relationships and entanglements with the natural world. In so doing, we will soon discover that films that seem to center on nature often say more about humans than the natural world they purport to represent. Films likely to be discussed (selection): Nanook of the North (1922) The Living Desert (1953) The Vanishing Prairie (1954) Life on Earth (1979) An Inconvenient Truth (2006) The National Parks: America's Best Idea (2009) Life (2009) Racing Extinction (2015) Anthropocene: The Human Epoch (2017) Some of the earliest documentary films, such as In the Land of the Head Hunters (1914) and Nanook of the North (1922), explore the relationship between human beings and their natural environments. Both Head Hunters and Nanook are also (pseudo-)scientific films, (purported) ethnographic studies of "primitive" peoples. As such, they demonstrate the close interconnection between science and motion pictures--indeed, motion pictures became important tools of scientific observation and inquiry practically as soon as they were discovered. In this seminar, we will explore ways in which documentary films frame (scientific) knowledge about nature, the environment, and humankind's varied relationships and entanglements with the natural world. In so doing, we will soon discover that films that seem to center on nature often say more about humans than the natural world they purport to represent. Films likely to be discussed (selection): Nanook of the North (1922) The Living Desert (1953) The Vanishing Prairie (1954) Life on Earth (1979) An Inconvenient Truth (2006) The National Parks: America's Best Idea (2009) Life (2009) Racing Extinction (2015) Anthropocene: The Human Epoch (2017)
Seminar 2 Rebecca Käpernick, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.115 Ü Written English Thursday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.503 Ü Vorbereitung auf das Fachpraktikum Englisch (Gym) Tuesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Erweiterungsfach
  • Master of Education
3.02.071 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies [B] Tuesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.040 V Introduction to Literary History and Textual Analysis Thursday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Lecture 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Bachelor
3.02.980 S Island Literature The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - Karsten Levihn-Kutzler
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.072 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies [C] Tuesday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.192 S Purilingualism in the EFL Classroom Tuesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 2 Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.023 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Tuesday: 10:15 - 11:45, fortnightly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.931 S Lexical Semantics Thursday: 17:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 3 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.172 S Interlanguage Pragmatics: Studying EFL Learners' Pragmatic Competence Thursday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
“Hwæt sceolan we drinkan?”, what looks like an odd mixture of English and German is actually correct English – just more or less 1300 years old. One can still rather easily recognize the interrogative pronoun “what” only that the “hw” is nowadays reversed. “Sceolan” is probably a little hard to decipher at first glance, however at least for German natives it should – especially in combination with the last word of the question – be quickly identifiable as the equivalent to Modern English “shall” (or sollen – in OE the “sc” was pronounced as “sh”). The fellow who phrased this particular question therefore spoke perfect (Old) English, and yet how come that it looks more like a heavy German dialect than proper English? This issue will be one of the leading questions for this seminar. Where did the English language come from? Why is it even called English? Where did the languages before English go? Was there something like an “Old English period”? To answer those (and other questions) a period of language history lasting around 800 years will be examined. The focus will thereby not only lay with understanding the basics of Old English spelling, phonology and surface structure, but also in identifying key concepts of language contact and language change and how they have left traces within the everyday language we use. “Hwæt sceolan we drinkan?”, what looks like an odd mixture of English and German is actually correct English – just more or less 1300 years old. One can still rather easily recognize the interrogative pronoun “what” only that the “hw” is nowadays reversed. “Sceolan” is probably a little hard to decipher at first glance, however at least for German natives it should – especially in combination with the last word of the question – be quickly identifiable as the equivalent to Modern English “shall” (or sollen – in OE the “sc” was pronounced as “sh”). The fellow who phrased this particular question therefore spoke perfect (Old) English, and yet how come that it looks more like a heavy German dialect than proper English? This issue will be one of the leading questions for this seminar. Where did the English language come from? Why is it even called English? Where did the languages before English go? Was there something like an “Old English period”? To answer those (and other questions) a period of language history lasting around 800 years will be examined. The focus will thereby not only lay with understanding the basics of Old English spelling, phonology and surface structure, but also in identifying key concepts of language contact and language change and how they have left traces within the everyday language we use.
Seminar 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.045 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Alena Cicholewski
  • Bachelor
3.02.315 KO Doing Research in Didactics/Vorbereitung Projektband (GHR300) im Fach Englisch Tuesday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.074 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Monday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
3.02.304 KO New Research in American Literary and Cultural Studies The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Colloquium - Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.504 Ü Vorbereitung auf das Forschungs- und Entwicklungspraktikum Fach Englisch (FEP) Thursday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Master of Education
3.02.056 TUT Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Tutorial - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.061 TUT Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Tutorial - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.035 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Tutorial - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.400 Ü Academic Discourse: Media Translation Monday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.403 Ü English for Educational Purposes Thursday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.001 V Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Wednesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Lecture 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.191 S Dimensions of Diversity Monday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.073 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Monday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
3.02.032 Ü Repetitorium: Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Monday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.070 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies [A] Monday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.022 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Monday: 08:15 - 09:45, fortnightly (from 24/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.997 Ü English Language Help Centre Monday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
The English Language Help Centre is open to all bachelor and master students in the English Department. Each session has a specific focus; participants can choose what they find useful and relevant to improve their English language skills. Participation is optional. You are welcome to use this course simply as a resource. The English Language Help Centre is open to all bachelor and master students in the English Department. Each session has a specific focus; participants can choose what they find useful and relevant to improve their English language skills. Participation is optional. You are welcome to use this course simply as a resource.
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
3.02.305 KO New Research in American Literary and Cultural Studies Wednesday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
This course is open to all students who are preparing to write - or who are already in the process of writing - their BA and MA theses in American literary and cultural studies, as well as to students who want to do a research module ("Recherchemodul"). Students will hone their academic writings skills with the help of various exercises and written assignments, develop an exposé, and share and revise their work in progress. The course also offers the opportunity to discuss theoretical texts central to the research projects of the participants. Requirements: Regular attendance to the scheduled online sessions; completion of all writing assignments; development of an exposé; active participation in class discussions. This course is open to all students who are preparing to write - or who are already in the process of writing - their BA and MA theses in American literary and cultural studies, as well as to students who want to do a research module ("Recherchemodul"). Students will hone their academic writings skills with the help of various exercises and written assignments, develop an exposé, and share and revise their work in progress. The course also offers the opportunity to discuss theoretical texts central to the research projects of the participants. Requirements: Regular attendance to the scheduled online sessions; completion of all writing assignments; development of an exposé; active participation in class discussions.
Colloquium 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.055 Ü Repetitorium: Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.02.044 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
3.02.021 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Monday: 08:15 - 09:45, fortnightly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.027 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Wednesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.077 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Wednesday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
3.02.024 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Tuesday: 10:15 - 11:45, fortnightly (from 25/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.004 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Tutorial - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.102 Ü Spoken English Tuesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.033 Ü Repetitorium: Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Monday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.481 S Methodology in ELT Tuesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Master of Education
3.02.002 Review: Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Wednesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.308 KO Anglistisches-Amerikanistisches Forschungskolloquium Thursday: 16:15 - 17:45, fortnightly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Master
3.02.006 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Tutorial - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.600 Ü Begleitveranstaltung für Tutor_innen der Anglistik/ Amerikanistik: Literatur/Kultur The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
miscellaneous - Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.112 Ü Written English Thursday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.180 S Introduction to Old English Monday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
The central topic of this seminar is to investigate language change. We will discuss roughly 1500 years focussing on periods that have conventionally been classified as "turning-points" in the linguistic history of the English language. Our inquiry will encompass processes of language internal change as well as the external influence as a result of language contact. The seminar itself will be presented as a downloadable podcast plus ppt-presentation, meaning that there is no weekly live session. However, we will meet a few times to clarify organizational matters and/or any questions that come up. The central topic of this seminar is to investigate language change. We will discuss roughly 1500 years focussing on periods that have conventionally been classified as "turning-points" in the linguistic history of the English language. Our inquiry will encompass processes of language internal change as well as the external influence as a result of language contact. The seminar itself will be presented as a downloadable podcast plus ppt-presentation, meaning that there is no weekly live session. However, we will meet a few times to clarify organizational matters and/or any questions that come up.
Seminar 2 (Moss) Hannah Bohrer
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.310 DS Directed Studies The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
miscellaneous - Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.113 Ü Written English Friday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.103 Ü Spoken English Wednesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.501 Ü Vorbereitung der Praxisphase GHR 300 im Unterrichtsfach Englisch Friday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 21/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Edeltraud Breiter
Alexandra Köhler
Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Master of Education
3.02.151 S The Post-Apocalyptic American City Wednesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
John Winthrop, Puritan leader and first governor of Massachusetts, famously described the British colony in the New World as a "city upon a hill." Winthrop's city established "a model of the American national imagination" (Bercovitch) and epitomized an exceptionalist narrative that imagined "the eyes of all people [...] upon" the Puritans. American cities have since often been associated with the future; however, this future has not always been defined by technological superiority and wealth, with actualizing the seemingly unlimited potentials of the New World. Indeed, post-apocalyptic American cities seem to permeate the popular imagination just as much as optimistic portrayals of American cities. In this seminar, we will discuss representations of various post-apocalyptic American cities. While introductory lectures will trace these representations to the early days of the American national project, our focus will be on cultural artifacts produced since the early twentieth century. We will (largely) progress chronologically through various media. Likely texts: Jack London, The Scarlet Plague (novella, 1912) W.E.B. Du Bois, "The Comet" (short story, 1920) Quiet, Please! (radio program, select episodes, 1947-1949) Dimension X (radio program, select episodes, 1950-1951) Richard Matheson, I Am Legend (novel, 1954) + I Am Legend (movie, 2007) The World, the Flesh, and the Devil (movie, 1959) On the Beach (movie, 1959) Judge Dredd (select comics from the late 1970s and 2012 movie) The Walking Dead (select comics and pilot episode of original TV series) Colson Whitehead, Zone One (novel, 2011) The Last of Us (videogame, 2013) Jeff Vandermeer, Borne (novel, 2017) Blade Runner 2049 (movie, 2017) John Winthrop, Puritan leader and first governor of Massachusetts, famously described the British colony in the New World as a "city upon a hill." Winthrop's city established "a model of the American national imagination" (Bercovitch) and epitomized an exceptionalist narrative that imagined "the eyes of all people [...] upon" the Puritans. American cities have since often been associated with the future; however, this future has not always been defined by technological superiority and wealth, with actualizing the seemingly unlimited potentials of the New World. Indeed, post-apocalyptic American cities seem to permeate the popular imagination just as much as optimistic portrayals of American cities. In this seminar, we will discuss representations of various post-apocalyptic American cities. While introductory lectures will trace these representations to the early days of the American national project, our focus will be on cultural artifacts produced since the early twentieth century. We will (largely) progress chronologically through various media. Likely texts: Jack London, The Scarlet Plague (novella, 1912) W.E.B. Du Bois, "The Comet" (short story, 1920) Quiet, Please! (radio program, select episodes, 1947-1949) Dimension X (radio program, select episodes, 1950-1951) Richard Matheson, I Am Legend (novel, 1954) + I Am Legend (movie, 2007) The World, the Flesh, and the Devil (movie, 1959) On the Beach (movie, 1959) Judge Dredd (select comics from the late 1970s and 2012 movie) The Walking Dead (select comics and pilot episode of original TV series) Colson Whitehead, Zone One (novel, 2011) The Last of Us (videogame, 2013) Jeff Vandermeer, Borne (novel, 2017) Blade Runner 2049 (movie, 2017)
Seminar 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.981 S Muslim American Cultures Freitag: 14:15 - 15:45, wöchentlich (from 21/10/22)

Description:
This seminar will introduce students to Muslim American histories and cultures through diverse visual representations of Muslim Americans. Selected pieces of photography and visual art as well as film scenes will raise awareness for stereotypical representations of Muslim Americans, while cultural artifacts produced by Muslim artists will illustrate how those stereotypes can be disrupted. Additionally, this seminar will cover graphic novels by Muslim American writers: Toufic El Rassi’s "Arab in America" (2007) and G. Willow Wilson’s "Ms. Marvel: No Normal" (2014). Toufic El Rassi’s graphic memoir "Arab in America" addresses his struggles of growing up as a Lebanese immigrant in the United States and his experiences with post-9/11 islamophobia. In contrast to the more realist mode of representation in El Rassi’s work, G. Willow Wilson’s "Ms. Marvel: No Normal" is the first volume of a superhero comic series that features Muslim Pakistani American teenage protagonist Kamala Khan whose secret superhero identity is shaped by her religious orientation and whose desire to fit into Anglo-American mainstream society is thwarted by her classmates’ xenophobic and islamophobic prejudices. We will pay special attention to the graphic novels’ narrative structure and style as well as to the ethical, social, political, and cultural issues they raise. Students will be asked to purchase their own copy of Toufic El Rassi’s "Arab in America" (2007) and G. Willow Wilson’s "Ms. Marvel: No Normal" (2014). Other reading material (including secondary literature) will be made available through Stud.IP. This seminar will introduce students to Muslim American histories and cultures through diverse visual representations of Muslim Americans. Selected pieces of photography and visual art as well as film scenes will raise awareness for stereotypical representations of Muslim Americans, while cultural artifacts produced by Muslim artists will illustrate how those stereotypes can be disrupted. Additionally, this seminar will cover graphic novels by Muslim American writers: Toufic El Rassi’s "Arab in America" (2007) and G. Willow Wilson’s "Ms. Marvel: No Normal" (2014). Toufic El Rassi’s graphic memoir "Arab in America" addresses his struggles of growing up as a Lebanese immigrant in the United States and his experiences with post-9/11 islamophobia. In contrast to the more realist mode of representation in El Rassi’s work, G. Willow Wilson’s "Ms. Marvel: No Normal" is the first volume of a superhero comic series that features Muslim Pakistani American teenage protagonist Kamala Khan whose secret superhero identity is shaped by her religious orientation and whose desire to fit into Anglo-American mainstream society is thwarted by her classmates’ xenophobic and islamophobic prejudices. We will pay special attention to the graphic novels’ narrative structure and style as well as to the ethical, social, political, and cultural issues they raise. Students will be asked to purchase their own copy of Toufic El Rassi’s "Arab in America" (2007) and G. Willow Wilson’s "Ms. Marvel: No Normal" (2014). Other reading material (including secondary literature) will be made available through Stud.IP.
Seminar 2 Dr. Alena Cicholewski
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.037 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Tutorial - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.405 Ü English for Educational Purposes Tuesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.311 KO Doing Research in Didactics Monday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 17/10/22)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.130 S Canadian Climate Change Fiction Thursday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 20/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.482 S Teaching Literature in the EFL Classroom Tuesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 18/10/22)

Description:
Teaching literature in the EFL Classroom Amongst the current generation of teaching professionals, the question whether literature – both with a capital and a small `l´- should be used in the EFL classroom is usually answered with a resounding “yes!”. For years critics of the competence-based approach have been calling for literature to be re-established as a means of fostering an education that goes beyond a mere acquisition of a certain skill set. In our digital age the number of literary texts available online as well as the products emerging from the communication between readers, texts and authors open up new types of literary discourse and expression transcending age, nationality and educational background. On the other hand, future teachers of English are bound to come across restrictions regarding their choice of literary works as well as the topics connected to them. German Abitur exams in particular require close scrutiny of the curriculum. Set texts and a variety of linguistic and analytical skills will be required to meet the assessment standards stipulated by the Ministry of Education. From primary school through to the final years of secondary school and Abitur-level both extensive reading of literary texts as well as reading with a view of composing a piece of writing are expected to be fostered systematically. The seminar aims at providing an overview of different literary texts, approaches and methods viable in the EFL classroom. Starting with visualisation techniques, story telling, scenic interpretation and creative writing participants are expected to get actively involved in classes by creating their own literary products and exchanging ideas about the viability of different didactic approaches. Other than that, everyone will be required to provide short keynote presentations on a selection of topics connected to teaching literature. You can put your name down for topics from the second week of term. Against the backdrop of current research in Didactics, participants are expected to analyse teaching and learning materials as well as (excerpts from) current textbooks for various age groups. Different approaches towards teaching literature will be explored. The development of units of work and lesson plans will be informed by relevant theories of language learning and teaching and can be critically applied to a selection of tasks, resources and ideas for projects connected to teaching literature. Lesson planning and the analysis of lessons involves • realistic target setting, • allowing for differentiation, • an appropriate choice of materials and media • as well as devising appropriate assessment strategies. Schemes of work submitted by students will be put under close scrutiny by peers and the lecturer in order to determine their viability in the classroom. Ideally, concepts and strategies will be put into practice during subsequent internships. As regards the submission of coursework as part of your final assessment, all participants are required to hand in a portfolio showing their ability to plan and reflect on lessons and schemes of work or tasks. Teaching literature in the EFL Classroom Amongst the current generation of teaching professionals, the question whether literature – both with a capital and a small `l´- should be used in the EFL classroom is usually answered with a resounding “yes!”. For years critics of the competence-based approach have been calling for literature to be re-established as a means of fostering an education that goes beyond a mere acquisition of a certain skill set. In our digital age the number of literary texts available online as well as the products emerging from the communication between readers, texts and authors open up new types of literary discourse and expression transcending age, nationality and educational background. On the other hand, future teachers of English are bound to come across restrictions regarding their choice of literary works as well as the topics connected to them. German Abitur exams in particular require close scrutiny of the curriculum. Set texts and a variety of linguistic and analytical skills will be required to meet the assessment standards stipulated by the Ministry of Education. From primary school through to the final years of secondary school and Abitur-level both extensive reading of literary texts as well as reading with a view of composing a piece of writing are expected to be fostered systematically. The seminar aims at providing an overview of different literary texts, approaches and methods viable in the EFL classroom. Starting with visualisation techniques, story telling, scenic interpretation and creative writing participants are expected to get actively involved in classes by creating their own literary products and exchanging ideas about the viability of different didactic approaches. Other than that, everyone will be required to provide short keynote presentations on a selection of topics connected to teaching literature. You can put your name down for topics from the second week of term. Against the backdrop of current research in Didactics, participants are expected to analyse teaching and learning materials as well as (excerpts from) current textbooks for various age groups. Different approaches towards teaching literature will be explored. The development of units of work and lesson plans will be informed by relevant theories of language learning and teaching and can be critically applied to a selection of tasks, resources and ideas for projects connected to teaching literature. Lesson planning and the analysis of lessons involves • realistic target setting, • allowing for differentiation, • an appropriate choice of materials and media • as well as devising appropriate assessment strategies. Schemes of work submitted by students will be put under close scrutiny by peers and the lecturer in order to determine their viability in the classroom. Ideally, concepts and strategies will be put into practice during subsequent internships. As regards the submission of coursework as part of your final assessment, all participants are required to hand in a portfolio showing their ability to plan and reflect on lessons and schemes of work or tasks.
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.990 S The Postcolonial Bildungsroman in Historical Perspective Wednesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Julia Wurr
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.111 Ü Written English Wednesday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 19/10/22)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
120 Seminars

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