Stud.IP Uni Oldenburg
University of Oldenburg
10.04.2020 12:49:40
Veranstaltungsverzeichnis

Institute of English and American Studies Click here for PDF-Download

Summer semester 2020 124 Seminars
VAK Course Number Title Type Lecture
Preliminary studies
Advanced courses
Practical course
Colloquium
Research group
Workgroup
Project group
Council conference
Internship
Language course
Subject didactics
Excursion
Tutorial
Committee
SWS Semester weekly hours Teachers Degree
3.02.309 KO Language Use, Variation and Change: Fach Anglistik/ Englisch Monday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 20/04/20)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.044 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 17/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
3.02.101 Ü Spoken English: Germany Through an Anglophone Lens Monday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 20/04/20)

Description:
“Admiration, antagonism & ambivalence” was what characterized British images of Germany before WWI according to the historian Richard Scully. This course explores representations of Germany, its people and its language, and how these images have changed historically. We will explore contexts such as Tatort, German citizenship classes, the World Cup, the German language according to Mark Twain, and stereotypes of Germany in the Anglophone press. The assessment requirement for this Spoken English course is a 15-20 minute oral language test at the end of the semester, with the grade to be added to the result from Written English. In-class presentations will count towards active participation and will provide students with valuable language feedback. “Admiration, antagonism & ambivalence” was what characterized British images of Germany before WWI according to the historian Richard Scully. This course explores representations of Germany, its people and its language, and how these images have changed historically. We will explore contexts such as Tatort, German citizenship classes, the World Cup, the German language according to Mark Twain, and stereotypes of Germany in the Anglophone press. The assessment requirement for this Spoken English course is a 15-20 minute oral language test at the end of the semester, with the grade to be added to the result from Written English. In-class presentations will count towards active participation and will provide students with valuable language feedback.
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.196 S Principles of EFL Teaching: Trends and Traditions Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 14/04/20)

Description:
The class is aimed at advanced Bachelor students who have already covered crucial aspects of EFL teaching in their foundation course (“Basismodul”). The skills and the knowledge acquired are going to be put to good use by adapting them to new and complex contexts. Prof. Gehring`s textbook “Englische Fachdidaktik” (2010) is a solid basis for further steps in the field of “Didactics”. By the end of the module, participants are expected to • be familiar with tradition and change in German EFL teaching and understand the underlying principles of educational policies. • consider different options regarding EFL teacher education in Europe. • be aware of documents such as the CEFR and its companion volume and their impact on FL learning and teaching in Europe. • critically assess the significance of native speaker models against the backdrop of plurilingual and pluricultural approaches. • name, explain and evaluate different approaches towards the use of media in the EFL classroom. • provide insightful commentaries and predictions regarding (the future of) e-learning in the EFL classroom. • explain the connection between testing and learning tasks and their significance for planning and units of work as well as individual lessons. • analyse a variety of tasks for different age groups with a view to collecting evidence of learning. • be familiar with standards and standardized tests. • shed a critical light on lesson plans and their viability based on established research in the field. The end-of term test is scheduled for 07 July and will cover the content and skills listed above. You will be asked to employ your knowledge and display your skills when tackling different tasks frequently based on authentic materials from e.g. textbooks. The class is aimed at advanced Bachelor students who have already covered crucial aspects of EFL teaching in their foundation course (“Basismodul”). The skills and the knowledge acquired are going to be put to good use by adapting them to new and complex contexts. Prof. Gehring`s textbook “Englische Fachdidaktik” (2010) is a solid basis for further steps in the field of “Didactics”. By the end of the module, participants are expected to • be familiar with tradition and change in German EFL teaching and understand the underlying principles of educational policies. • consider different options regarding EFL teacher education in Europe. • be aware of documents such as the CEFR and its companion volume and their impact on FL learning and teaching in Europe. • critically assess the significance of native speaker models against the backdrop of plurilingual and pluricultural approaches. • name, explain and evaluate different approaches towards the use of media in the EFL classroom. • provide insightful commentaries and predictions regarding (the future of) e-learning in the EFL classroom. • explain the connection between testing and learning tasks and their significance for planning and units of work as well as individual lessons. • analyse a variety of tasks for different age groups with a view to collecting evidence of learning. • be familiar with standards and standardized tests. • shed a critical light on lesson plans and their viability based on established research in the field. The end-of term test is scheduled for 07 July and will cover the content and skills listed above. You will be asked to employ your knowledge and display your skills when tackling different tasks frequently based on authentic materials from e.g. textbooks.
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.010 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 17/04/20)

Description:
Tutorial - Nadine Rogalski
  • Bachelor
3.02.534a Ü Begleitung und Nachbereitung der Praxisphase GHR 300 im Unterrichtsfach Englisch Dates on Friday. 28.02.20, Friday. 20.03.20, Friday. 24.04.20, Friday. 08.05.20, Friday. 29.05.20, Friday. 12.06.20, Friday. 26.06.20 08:00 - 10:00, Thursday. 16.07.20 - Friday. 17.07.20 10:00 - 16:00, Location: A04 4-419, V03 0-E003, V03 0-E002(+2 more)
Description:
Exercises - Elisabeth Lücken
Kerstin Weerts
Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Master of Education
3.02.170 S History of English: Old English Wednesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 22/04/20)

Description:
“Hwæt sceolan we drinkan?”, what looks like an odd mixture of English and German is actually correct English – just more or less 1300 years old. One can still rather easily recognize the interrogative pronoun “what” only that the “hw” is nowadays reversed. “Sceolan” is probably a little hard to decipher at first glance, however at least for German natives it should – especially in combination with the last word of the question – be quickly identifiable as the equivalent to Modern English “shall” (or sollen – in OE the “sc” was pronounced as “sh”). The fellow who phrased this particular question therefore spoke perfect (Old) English, and yet how come that it looks more like a heavy German dialect than proper English? This issue will be one of the leading questions for this seminar. Where did the English language come from? Why is it even called English? Where did the languages before English go? Was there something like an “Old English period”? To answer those (and other questions) a period of language history lasting around 800 years will be examined. The focus will thereby not only lay with understanding the basics of Old English spelling, phonology and surface structure, but also in identifying key concepts of language contact and language change and how they have left traces within the everyday language we use. “Hwæt sceolan we drinkan?”, what looks like an odd mixture of English and German is actually correct English – just more or less 1300 years old. One can still rather easily recognize the interrogative pronoun “what” only that the “hw” is nowadays reversed. “Sceolan” is probably a little hard to decipher at first glance, however at least for German natives it should – especially in combination with the last word of the question – be quickly identifiable as the equivalent to Modern English “shall” (or sollen – in OE the “sc” was pronounced as “sh”). The fellow who phrased this particular question therefore spoke perfect (Old) English, and yet how come that it looks more like a heavy German dialect than proper English? This issue will be one of the leading questions for this seminar. Where did the English language come from? Why is it even called English? Where did the languages before English go? Was there something like an “Old English period”? To answer those (and other questions) a period of language history lasting around 800 years will be examined. The focus will thereby not only lay with understanding the basics of Old English spelling, phonology and surface structure, but also in identifying key concepts of language contact and language change and how they have left traces within the everyday language we use.
Seminar 2 Nils Rademacher
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.080 (f) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: The United States Wednesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 22/04/20)

Description:
The “Academic Speaking and Writing Skills” courses make up the second part of the Sprachpraxis module ang080. These are practical courses geared toward teaching you how to give effective presentations in an academic setting and developing your academic writing ability, as well as introducing the culture, language and society of the United States of America. In this course, you will prepare and give a short presentation, lead a discussion activity, write an in-class writing task as well as complete language assignments focussing on useful language for academic speaking and writing. As with “Introduction to Integrated Language Skills”, the course is graded on a pass-fail basis. The “Academic Speaking and Writing Skills” courses make up the second part of the Sprachpraxis module ang080. These are practical courses geared toward teaching you how to give effective presentations in an academic setting and developing your academic writing ability, as well as introducing the culture, language and society of the United States of America. In this course, you will prepare and give a short presentation, lead a discussion activity, write an in-class writing task as well as complete language assignments focussing on useful language for academic speaking and writing. As with “Introduction to Integrated Language Skills”, the course is graded on a pass-fail basis.
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.02.023 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 10/06/20)
Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 22/04/20), Video conference in the course 3.02.022

Description:
Exercises 4 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
3.02.009 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Thursday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 16/04/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Sarah Kaltofen
  • Bachelor
3.02.301 KO Abschlusskolloquium: BA, MEd, DoktorandInnen Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 15/04/20)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.102 Ü Spoken English: Germany Through an Anglophone Lens Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 23/04/20)

Description:
“Admiration, antagonism & ambivalence” was what characterized British images of Germany before WWI according to the historian Richard Scully. This course explores representations of Germany, its people and its language, and how these images have changed historically. We will explore contexts such as Tatort, German citizenship classes, the World Cup, the German language according to Mark Twain, and stereotypes of Germany in the Anglophone press. The assessment requirement for this Spoken English course is a 15-20 minute oral language test at the end of the semester, with the grade to be added to the result from Written English. In-class presentations will count towards active participation and will provide students with valuable language feedback. “Admiration, antagonism & ambivalence” was what characterized British images of Germany before WWI according to the historian Richard Scully. This course explores representations of Germany, its people and its language, and how these images have changed historically. We will explore contexts such as Tatort, German citizenship classes, the World Cup, the German language according to Mark Twain, and stereotypes of Germany in the Anglophone press. The assessment requirement for this Spoken English course is a 15-20 minute oral language test at the end of the semester, with the grade to be added to the result from Written English. In-class presentations will count towards active participation and will provide students with valuable language feedback.
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.305 KO New Research in American Literary and Cultural Studies Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 21/04/20)

Description:
Colloquium 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.011 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Monday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 20/04/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Nathalie Bies
  • Bachelor
3.02.006 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 15/04/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Nadine Rogalski
  • Bachelor
3.02.405 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Designing Speaking Activities Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 16/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.045 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Friday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 17/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
3.02.020 V Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 21/04/20)

Description:
Lecture 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
3.02.150 S Religion and the Stage in Early Modern England Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 16/04/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Galena Hashhozheva
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.160 S Language Acquisition and Disorders Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 14/04/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Cornelia Hamann
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.195 S Methods, Media and Innovations in the EFL Classroom Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 14/04/20)

Description:
The class is aimed at advanced Bachelor students who have already covered crucial aspects of EFL teaching in their foundation course (“Basismodul”). The skills and the knowledge acquired are going to be put to good use by adapting them to new and complex contexts. Prof. Gehring`s textbook “Englische Fachdidaktik” (2010) is a solid basis for further steps in the field of “Didactics”. By the end of the module, participants are expected to • explore the role of digital media in EFL teaching by focusing on relevant scholarly sources and applications, e.g. online games, websites, tests, etc. • be familiar with the way digital learning is reflected in curricula and educational policies. • provide insightful commentaries and predictions regarding (the future of) e-learning in the EFL classroom. • be familiar with tradition and change in German EFL teaching by particularly focusing on the use of different teaching and learning methods. • be aware of documents such as the CEFR and its companion volume and their impact on FL learning and teaching in Europe. • name, explain and evaluate different approaches towards the use of media in the EFL classroom. • explain the connection between testing and learning tasks and their significance for planning and units of work as well as individual lessons. • analyse a variety of tasks for different age groups with a view to collecting evidence of learning. • be familiar with standards and standardized tests. • shed a critical light on lesson plans and their viability based on established research in the field. The end-of term test is scheduled for 07 July and will cover the content and skills listed above. You will be asked to employ your knowledge and display your skills when tackling different tasks frequently based on authentic materials. Digital media as well as methods will be very relevant for test-taking preparations. The class is aimed at advanced Bachelor students who have already covered crucial aspects of EFL teaching in their foundation course (“Basismodul”). The skills and the knowledge acquired are going to be put to good use by adapting them to new and complex contexts. Prof. Gehring`s textbook “Englische Fachdidaktik” (2010) is a solid basis for further steps in the field of “Didactics”. By the end of the module, participants are expected to • explore the role of digital media in EFL teaching by focusing on relevant scholarly sources and applications, e.g. online games, websites, tests, etc. • be familiar with the way digital learning is reflected in curricula and educational policies. • provide insightful commentaries and predictions regarding (the future of) e-learning in the EFL classroom. • be familiar with tradition and change in German EFL teaching by particularly focusing on the use of different teaching and learning methods. • be aware of documents such as the CEFR and its companion volume and their impact on FL learning and teaching in Europe. • name, explain and evaluate different approaches towards the use of media in the EFL classroom. • explain the connection between testing and learning tasks and their significance for planning and units of work as well as individual lessons. • analyse a variety of tasks for different age groups with a view to collecting evidence of learning. • be familiar with standards and standardized tests. • shed a critical light on lesson plans and their viability based on established research in the field. The end-of term test is scheduled for 07 July and will cover the content and skills listed above. You will be asked to employ your knowledge and display your skills when tackling different tasks frequently based on authentic materials. Digital media as well as methods will be very relevant for test-taking preparations.
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.039 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Thursday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 16/04/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Anneke Gerken
  • Bachelor
3.02.088 Ü English Language Help Centre Monday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 20/04/20)

Description:
Exercises - Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
3.02.022 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 22/04/20)
Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 10/06/20)

Description:
Exercises 4 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
3.02.161 S Interlanguages Friday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 17/04/20)

Description:
Seminar - Lina Abed Ibrahim, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.406 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Listening in the language classroom Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 21/04/20)

Description:
Is there more to helping English students develop listening skills than pressing play on a textbook recording or a YouTube video? After all, listening is an imperceptible, individual process. If our students say they 'don't understand', we can't easily hear, see or react to the source of the problem in the same way we can in speaking, writing and even reading activities. And yet, this invisible process is the only one fully controlled by the teacher - he or she is traditionally the only one in control of the play button. In order to tackle this predicament, we will break down the general concept of 'listening skills' into more manageable components that can be targeted through classroom-friendly tasks. We will practice designing and implementing these tasks based on three main sources of listening input: textbook recordings, authentic audio and video materials, and teacher talk. Is there more to helping English students develop listening skills than pressing play on a textbook recording or a YouTube video? After all, listening is an imperceptible, individual process. If our students say they 'don't understand', we can't easily hear, see or react to the source of the problem in the same way we can in speaking, writing and even reading activities. And yet, this invisible process is the only one fully controlled by the teacher - he or she is traditionally the only one in control of the play button. In order to tackle this predicament, we will break down the general concept of 'listening skills' into more manageable components that can be targeted through classroom-friendly tasks. We will practice designing and implementing these tasks based on three main sources of listening input: textbook recordings, authentic audio and video materials, and teacher talk.
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.115 Ü Written English: Reimagining education Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 23/04/20)

Description:
Bring iPads into the classroom! Bring students out of the classroom! These days, there is no shortage of creative approaches to transforming school learning, and yet - the maxim 'teachers teach the way they were taught' still holds true, at least as a stereotype. Why is that the case? And how do we tell a short-lived fad from true innovation? In this Written English course, we will consider the merits of various non-traditional approaches to education and the obstacles in their way. This course forms one half of the compulsory module ang311: Integrated Language Skills. The module is assessed via a portfolio and the assessment requirements here are a take-home essay and a written language test. The grade will be added to the result from Spoken English. Homework assignments as required by the lecturer will count towards active participation. Bring iPads into the classroom! Bring students out of the classroom! These days, there is no shortage of creative approaches to transforming school learning, and yet - the maxim 'teachers teach the way they were taught' still holds true, at least as a stereotype. Why is that the case? And how do we tell a short-lived fad from true innovation? In this Written English course, we will consider the merits of various non-traditional approaches to education and the obstacles in their way. This course forms one half of the compulsory module ang311: Integrated Language Skills. The module is assessed via a portfolio and the assessment requirements here are a take-home essay and a written language test. The grade will be added to the result from Spoken English. Homework assignments as required by the lecturer will count towards active participation.
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.201 S An Introduction to Teaching Literature Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 20/04/20)

Description:
Teaching literature in the EFL Classroom Amongst the current generation of teaching professionals, the question whether literature – both with a capital and a small `l´- should be used in the EFL classroom is usually answered with a resounding “yes!”. For years critics of the competence-based approach have been calling for literature to be re-established as a means of fostering an education that goes beyond a mere acquisition of a certain skill set. In our digital age the number of literary texts available online as well as the products emerging from the communication between readers, texts and authors open up new types of literary discourse and expression transcending age, nationality and educational background. On the other hand, future teachers of English are bound to come across restrictions regarding their choice of literary works as well as the topics connected to them. German Abitur exams in particular require close scrutiny of the curriculum. Set texts and a variety of linguistic and analytical skills will be required to meet the assessment standards stipulated by the Ministry of Education. From primary school through to the final years of secondary school and Abitur-level both extensive reading of literary texts as well as reading with a view of composing a piece of writing are expected to be fostered systematically. The seminar aims at providing an overview of different literary texts, approaches and methods viable in the EFL classroom. Starting with visualisation techniques, story telling, scenic interpretation and creative writing participants are expected to get actively involved in classes by creating their own literary products and exchanging ideas about the viability of different didactic approaches. Against the backdrop of current research in Didactics, participants are expected to analyse teaching and learning materials as well as (excerpts from) current textbooks for various age groups. Different approaches towards teaching literature will be explored. The development of units of work and lesson plans will be informed by relevant theories of language learning and teaching and can be critically applied to a selection of tasks, resources and ideas for projects connected to teaching literature. Lesson planning and the analysis of lessons involves • realistic target setting, • allowing for differentiation, • an appropriate choice of materials and media • as well as devising appropriate assessment strategies. As a final assessment, there will be a test paper at the end of term. Teaching literature in the EFL Classroom Amongst the current generation of teaching professionals, the question whether literature – both with a capital and a small `l´- should be used in the EFL classroom is usually answered with a resounding “yes!”. For years critics of the competence-based approach have been calling for literature to be re-established as a means of fostering an education that goes beyond a mere acquisition of a certain skill set. In our digital age the number of literary texts available online as well as the products emerging from the communication between readers, texts and authors open up new types of literary discourse and expression transcending age, nationality and educational background. On the other hand, future teachers of English are bound to come across restrictions regarding their choice of literary works as well as the topics connected to them. German Abitur exams in particular require close scrutiny of the curriculum. Set texts and a variety of linguistic and analytical skills will be required to meet the assessment standards stipulated by the Ministry of Education. From primary school through to the final years of secondary school and Abitur-level both extensive reading of literary texts as well as reading with a view of composing a piece of writing are expected to be fostered systematically. The seminar aims at providing an overview of different literary texts, approaches and methods viable in the EFL classroom. Starting with visualisation techniques, story telling, scenic interpretation and creative writing participants are expected to get actively involved in classes by creating their own literary products and exchanging ideas about the viability of different didactic approaches. Against the backdrop of current research in Didactics, participants are expected to analyse teaching and learning materials as well as (excerpts from) current textbooks for various age groups. Different approaches towards teaching literature will be explored. The development of units of work and lesson plans will be informed by relevant theories of language learning and teaching and can be critically applied to a selection of tasks, resources and ideas for projects connected to teaching literature. Lesson planning and the analysis of lessons involves • realistic target setting, • allowing for differentiation, • an appropriate choice of materials and media • as well as devising appropriate assessment strategies. As a final assessment, there will be a test paper at the end of term.
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.081 (g) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Discovering Canadian Culture Wednesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 15/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
3.02.530 Ü Betreuung des Praxisblocks vor Ort (HR) im Unterrichtsfach Englisch The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Exercises - Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.991 S The Shape of Water: Issues and Representation of Water in Environmental Film and Literature Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 21/04/20)

Description:
At the center of the study of this course is water – as a construct, as medial representation, as an elemental agent that has been shaped by and that in itself shapes cultural and natural history, as contested and endangered resource, or as ethical, material, and aesthetic concern. To study water in manifestations as multifaceted as these is an ambitious undertaking, which is why this class's focus on the genres of (new) nature writing and environmental film documentaries aims to facilitate our studies. Questions that will guide our readings are, for instance, what values, powers, and beauties are ascribed to water? What are the narratives that are told, or not told, about water and its relations with humans, other animals, or ecological processes? What ethical as well as aesthetical concerns are broached in our reading materials? And what particular challenges does the Anthropocene pose to the usage, understanding, exploitation, and representation of water? In what ways are human lives shaped by water as an autonomous elemental force? Please purchase and read/watch the following reading/film materials: Rachel Carson’s The Sea Around Us (1951); Roger Deakin’s Waterlog (1999); Watermark (2013) directed by Jennifer Baichwal and Edward Burtynsky; and Blue (2017) directed by Karina Holden. Additional reading materials will be available on Stud.IP at the beginning of the semester. At the center of the study of this course is water – as a construct, as medial representation, as an elemental agent that has been shaped by and that in itself shapes cultural and natural history, as contested and endangered resource, or as ethical, material, and aesthetic concern. To study water in manifestations as multifaceted as these is an ambitious undertaking, which is why this class's focus on the genres of (new) nature writing and environmental film documentaries aims to facilitate our studies. Questions that will guide our readings are, for instance, what values, powers, and beauties are ascribed to water? What are the narratives that are told, or not told, about water and its relations with humans, other animals, or ecological processes? What ethical as well as aesthetical concerns are broached in our reading materials? And what particular challenges does the Anthropocene pose to the usage, understanding, exploitation, and representation of water? In what ways are human lives shaped by water as an autonomous elemental force? Please purchase and read/watch the following reading/film materials: Rachel Carson’s The Sea Around Us (1951); Roger Deakin’s Waterlog (1999); Watermark (2013) directed by Jennifer Baichwal and Edward Burtynsky; and Blue (2017) directed by Karina Holden. Additional reading materials will be available on Stud.IP at the beginning of the semester.
Seminar 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.303 KO New Research in Applied and Theoretical Linguistics Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 20/04/20)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Cornelia Hamann
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.317 DS Directed Studies Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 16/04/20)

Description:
Miscellaneous 2 Dr. Galena Hashhozheva
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.027 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Monday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 08/06/20)
Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 21/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 4 Rabea Thorwesten
  • Bachelor
3.02.037 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 16/04/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Sarah Kaltofen
  • Bachelor
3.02.120 S Accounts of the Count: Dracula Rising Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 14/04/20)

Description:
The seminar is at the same time an homage to and an analysis of the world's most famous (and arguably most creepy) vampire: Count Dracula. Approaching the topic from a neo-Victorian angle, the course aims to trace the aspects that inspire and eventually necessitate a revision of this Victorian revenant. Revisiting this character will lead us to address issues as diverse as gender and sexuality, colonization, drug addiction, fans, fandoms and intertextuality. Consequently, we will discuss a number of Victorian and neo-Victorian texts, all of which have in common that they engage in a confrontation with the past in order to reassess and rewrite Victorian horror stories whose influence shape British culture up to the present day. Please read/ watch: Polidori, Jon. "The Vampyre." 1819. %%The Vampyre and Other Tales of the Macabre%%. Oxford: OUP, 2008. 1-24. Print. Sheridan Le Fanu, J. "Carmilla." 1872. %%In a Glass Darkly%%. Oxford: OUP, 2008. 243-319. Print. Stoker, Bram. %%Dracula%%. 1897. Eds. Nina Auerbach and David J. Skal. New York and London: Norton, 1997. Print. %%Interview with a Vampire%%. 1994. Dir. Neil Jordan. Perf. Tom Cruise, Brad Pitt, Christian Slater, Antonia Banderas, and Kirsten Dunst. Warner Bros., 2003. DVD. %%Ed Wood%%. 1994. Dir. Tim Burton. Perf. Johnny Depp, Martin Landau, Sarah Jessica Parker, Patricia Arquette, and Bill Murray. Buena Vista Pictures, 2003. DVD. %%Twilight%%. 2008. Dir. Catherine Hardwicke. Perf. Kristen Steward and Robert Pattinson. Summit Entertainment, 2010. DVD. The seminar is at the same time an homage to and an analysis of the world's most famous (and arguably most creepy) vampire: Count Dracula. Approaching the topic from a neo-Victorian angle, the course aims to trace the aspects that inspire and eventually necessitate a revision of this Victorian revenant. Revisiting this character will lead us to address issues as diverse as gender and sexuality, colonization, drug addiction, fans, fandoms and intertextuality. Consequently, we will discuss a number of Victorian and neo-Victorian texts, all of which have in common that they engage in a confrontation with the past in order to reassess and rewrite Victorian horror stories whose influence shape British culture up to the present day. Please read/ watch: Polidori, Jon. "The Vampyre." 1819. %%The Vampyre and Other Tales of the Macabre%%. Oxford: OUP, 2008. 1-24. Print. Sheridan Le Fanu, J. "Carmilla." 1872. %%In a Glass Darkly%%. Oxford: OUP, 2008. 243-319. Print. Stoker, Bram. %%Dracula%%. 1897. Eds. Nina Auerbach and David J. Skal. New York and London: Norton, 1997. Print. %%Interview with a Vampire%%. 1994. Dir. Neil Jordan. Perf. Tom Cruise, Brad Pitt, Christian Slater, Antonia Banderas, and Kirsten Dunst. Warner Bros., 2003. DVD. %%Ed Wood%%. 1994. Dir. Tim Burton. Perf. Johnny Depp, Martin Landau, Sarah Jessica Parker, Patricia Arquette, and Bill Murray. Buena Vista Pictures, 2003. DVD. %%Twilight%%. 2008. Dir. Catherine Hardwicke. Perf. Kristen Steward and Robert Pattinson. Summit Entertainment, 2010. DVD.
Seminar 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.534b Ü Begleitung und Nachbereitung der Praxisphase GHR 300 im Unterrichtsfach Englisch Dates on Friday. 28.02.20, Friday. 20.03.20, Friday. 24.04.20, Friday. 08.05.20, Friday. 29.05.20, Friday. 12.06.20, Friday. 26.06.20 12 ...(more), Location: A01 0-006, A06 0-009, A14 0-031(+3 more)
Description:
Exercises - Edeltraud Breiter
Alexandra Köhler
Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Master of Education
3.02.110 Ü Written English: Exploration and Expeditions Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 23/04/20), Location: A10 1-121a
Dates on Thursday. 23.07.20 14:30 - 16:30, Thursday. 23.07.20 16:00 - 18:00, Location: A11 1-101 (Hörsaal B), ((A10 1-121a))

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.481 S Methodology in ELT Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 14/04/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Master of Education
3.02.304 KO New Research in American Studies: Fach Anglistik und Amerikanistik/ Englisch Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 14/04/20)

Description:
Colloquium - Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.036 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Tuesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 14/04/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Edda Hagemann
  • Bachelor
3.02.970 S “Science & Literature”: Evolution and the Novel Dates on Monday. 20.07.20 - Friday. 24.07.20, Monday. 27.07.20 - Friday. 31.07.20 08:00 - 19:00
Description:
Sigmund Freud famously called Darwin’s theory of evolution and the idea that humans and apes descended from common ancestors one of the great blows to human narcissism. While Freud may be a bit grandiloquent here, the theory of evolution did leave a profound imprint on Western thinking. Evolution changed how people in the late 19th and early 20th century thought about what human beings are, how they relate to the natural world and how they imagined the emergence and decline of societies, ecosystems, and species. In the wake of Darwin, popular and literary fiction became important vehicles for working through Darwin’s theory and the resulting cultural anxieties about evolution, degeneration, extinction, and eugenics. The seminar will delineate Darwin’s work and its intellectual context and then focus on three texts and their responses to the Darwinian theory of evolution: Charles Kingsley’s The Water Babies, a defense of Darwin in the form of a fairy tale, H.G. Wells’ groundbreaking speculation about Britain’s evolutionary future, The Time Machine, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s feminist utopia, Herland. The seminar will be an interdisciplinary compact course, co-taught with historian of science (and renowned Darwin-authority) Prof. Piers Hale (University of Oklahoma). The bulk of the seminar will take place during the term break, from Monday 20 to Friday 31 July (2x90 minutes per day in the mornings). There will be a preliminary meeting in late April/early May to clarify organizational questions, the precise date of which will be announced shortly. UPDATE: Due to current developments, we now do not expect students from Oklahoma to join the seminar (as was previously announced). However, we still expect that Prof. Hale will collaborate in teaching the seminar. Sigmund Freud famously called Darwin’s theory of evolution and the idea that humans and apes descended from common ancestors one of the great blows to human narcissism. While Freud may be a bit grandiloquent here, the theory of evolution did leave a profound imprint on Western thinking. Evolution changed how people in the late 19th and early 20th century thought about what human beings are, how they relate to the natural world and how they imagined the emergence and decline of societies, ecosystems, and species. In the wake of Darwin, popular and literary fiction became important vehicles for working through Darwin’s theory and the resulting cultural anxieties about evolution, degeneration, extinction, and eugenics. The seminar will delineate Darwin’s work and its intellectual context and then focus on three texts and their responses to the Darwinian theory of evolution: Charles Kingsley’s The Water Babies, a defense of Darwin in the form of a fairy tale, H.G. Wells’ groundbreaking speculation about Britain’s evolutionary future, The Time Machine, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s feminist utopia, Herland. The seminar will be an interdisciplinary compact course, co-taught with historian of science (and renowned Darwin-authority) Prof. Piers Hale (University of Oklahoma). The bulk of the seminar will take place during the term break, from Monday 20 to Friday 31 July (2x90 minutes per day in the mornings). There will be a preliminary meeting in late April/early May to clarify organizational questions, the precise date of which will be announced shortly. UPDATE: Due to current developments, we now do not expect students from Oklahoma to join the seminar (as was previously announced). However, we still expect that Prof. Hale will collaborate in teaching the seminar.
Seminar - Dr. des. Karsten Levihn-Kutzler
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.048 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Wednesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 22/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
3.02.181 S Morphology Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 15/04/20)

Description:
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Marcel Schlechtweg
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.086 Organisation and Supervision of Compulsory Stay Abroad The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Exercises - Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.074 (e) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: British and Irish Politics, History and Culture Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 22/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
3.02.401 Ü Academic Discourse: Practical Translation Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 21/04/20)

Description:
“Practical translation” aims to heighten your awareness of the differences between German and English, and to enable you to circumnavigate common translation problems. We will begin by looking at common problems such as translating complex noun phrases, relative clauses, false friends, progressive / simple / perfective aspects as part of a topic-based unit on Government and Politics in the UK and USA. You will then be given the opportunity, in small groups, to select your own text to translate; fictional, political, scientific research, an abstract, a film review, marketing, tourism, which you will present in class for peer review. Practical translation thus focusses on fine-tuning your accuracy and use of idiomatic English as well as equipping you with the tools to edit and translate a variety of genres of text. - The assessment is based on two in-class tests (one mid-semester and compulsory, and one optional for students needing 3 credit points at the end of the semester; both compulsory for students requiring 6 credit points), plus the group translation of the text you selected and an individual commentary. “Practical translation” aims to heighten your awareness of the differences between German and English, and to enable you to circumnavigate common translation problems. We will begin by looking at common problems such as translating complex noun phrases, relative clauses, false friends, progressive / simple / perfective aspects as part of a topic-based unit on Government and Politics in the UK and USA. You will then be given the opportunity, in small groups, to select your own text to translate; fictional, political, scientific research, an abstract, a film review, marketing, tourism, which you will present in class for peer review. Practical translation thus focusses on fine-tuning your accuracy and use of idiomatic English as well as equipping you with the tools to edit and translate a variety of genres of text. - The assessment is based on two in-class tests (one mid-semester and compulsory, and one optional for students needing 3 credit points at the end of the semester; both compulsory for students requiring 6 credit points), plus the group translation of the text you selected and an individual commentary.
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.021 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 21/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
3.02.112 Ü Written English: British Asian Cinema Friday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 24/04/20)

Description:
British Asian cinema has its roots in the Black politics of the 1960s and '70s when a new wave of politically active filmmakers began to use film to challenge racism and create greater awareness of issues facing their communities, such as poverty and social exclusion. British Asian films, in keeping with these roots, focus on the position of South-Asian communities in Britain, and on the complex experiences of second generation British Asians growing up with both cultures. Key issues are conforming to, or rejecting, aspects of both cultures, often centering on religion, “arranged marriage”, intergenerational conflict, gender expectations, sexuality and racism. - This Written English course forms one half of the compulsory module ang311: Integrated Language Skills. The module is assessed via a portfolio and the assessment requirements are a take-home essay, an edited version of this essay, and a written language test. The grade will be added to the result from Spoken English. Homework assignments as required by the lecturer will count towards active participation. ASSESSMENT: 50% language based, 50% content based. British Asian cinema has its roots in the Black politics of the 1960s and '70s when a new wave of politically active filmmakers began to use film to challenge racism and create greater awareness of issues facing their communities, such as poverty and social exclusion. British Asian films, in keeping with these roots, focus on the position of South-Asian communities in Britain, and on the complex experiences of second generation British Asians growing up with both cultures. Key issues are conforming to, or rejecting, aspects of both cultures, often centering on religion, “arranged marriage”, intergenerational conflict, gender expectations, sexuality and racism. - This Written English course forms one half of the compulsory module ang311: Integrated Language Skills. The module is assessed via a portfolio and the assessment requirements are a take-home essay, an edited version of this essay, and a written language test. The grade will be added to the result from Spoken English. Homework assignments as required by the lecturer will count towards active participation. ASSESSMENT: 50% language based, 50% content based.
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.999 Creative Writing Wednesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 15/04/20)

Description:
The aim of this workshop-style writing group is to get together and share your own work with the group for feedback and discussion. It is a great opportunity for both experienced and novice writers to expand their repertoire, learn new things and experience other people's interpretations and poetry first-hand. Whether you already have a large collection to share, or you've never written a word in your life - people of all levels of skill are welcome to join us. The intended focus of this course is poetic writing, topics for the sessions will be decided among the course participants. The aim of this workshop-style writing group is to get together and share your own work with the group for feedback and discussion. It is a great opportunity for both experienced and novice writers to expand their repertoire, learn new things and experience other people's interpretations and poetry first-hand. Whether you already have a large collection to share, or you've never written a word in your life - people of all levels of skill are welcome to join us. The intended focus of this course is poetic writing, topics for the sessions will be decided among the course participants.
Miscellaneous - M.A. Jascha Kattmann
  • Bachelor
3.02.980 S Jagged Little Pills: Self-Enhancement and Substance Abuse in Literature and Film, from Opium to Neuroenhancers Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 15/04/20)

Description:
Course description: According to Foucault, the principle aim of a biopolitical society in a Capitalist culture is to enhance and optimise life in order to maximise productivity. Consequently, the lives of both individuals and society as a whole have long been organised in ways that apparently meet precisely these ends. And yet, the neo-liberal policies of the last decades arguably seem to have reinforced this development, not least by leading individuals to manipulate their own mental and physical capacities so as to enhance their efficiency and to 'optimise' themselves. Building on Foucault's concept of %%biopower%%, this seminar problematises literary and cinematic representations of substance (ab-)use in the context of self-enhancement and self-optimisation. We will discuss the use of a wide range of drugs, such as opium, cocaine, or nootropics, and their various intended effects, be they medicinal, recreational, or performance-enhancing (via micro-dosing, for example). The aim of the seminar is, therefore, twofold: firstly, it traces the historical construction of addiction and the emergence of the addict as an identity category; and secondly, it seeks to deconstruct the mechanisms of an ideological regime that, paradoxically, has come to criminalise and ostracise behaviours it arguably incites at the same time. Moreover, it may in fact require these very behaviours in order to thrive – not uncommonly, that is, at the expanse of those who suffer the effects of addiction. Please buy and read/watch: De Quincey, Thomas. %%Confessions of an English Opium-Eater and Other Writings%%. 1821. Oxford: OUP, 2008. Print. Stevenson, Robert Louis. %%Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde%%. 1886. Ed. Katherine Linehan. New York and London: Norton, 2003. Print. Conan Doyle, Arthur. %%The Sign of Four%%. 1890. London Penguin, 2001. Print. (excerpts) %%Limitless%%. Dir. Neil Burger. Per. Bradley Cooper, Abbie Cornish, and Robert De Niro. 2011. Concorde, 2011. DVD. %%The Wolf of Wall Street%%. Dir. Martin Scorsese. Perf. Leonardo DiCaprio, Jonah Hill, and Margot Robbie. 2013. Universal, 2014. DVD. Course description: According to Foucault, the principle aim of a biopolitical society in a Capitalist culture is to enhance and optimise life in order to maximise productivity. Consequently, the lives of both individuals and society as a whole have long been organised in ways that apparently meet precisely these ends. And yet, the neo-liberal policies of the last decades arguably seem to have reinforced this development, not least by leading individuals to manipulate their own mental and physical capacities so as to enhance their efficiency and to 'optimise' themselves. Building on Foucault's concept of %%biopower%%, this seminar problematises literary and cinematic representations of substance (ab-)use in the context of self-enhancement and self-optimisation. We will discuss the use of a wide range of drugs, such as opium, cocaine, or nootropics, and their various intended effects, be they medicinal, recreational, or performance-enhancing (via micro-dosing, for example). The aim of the seminar is, therefore, twofold: firstly, it traces the historical construction of addiction and the emergence of the addict as an identity category; and secondly, it seeks to deconstruct the mechanisms of an ideological regime that, paradoxically, has come to criminalise and ostracise behaviours it arguably incites at the same time. Moreover, it may in fact require these very behaviours in order to thrive – not uncommonly, that is, at the expanse of those who suffer the effects of addiction. Please buy and read/watch: De Quincey, Thomas. %%Confessions of an English Opium-Eater and Other Writings%%. 1821. Oxford: OUP, 2008. Print. Stevenson, Robert Louis. %%Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde%%. 1886. Ed. Katherine Linehan. New York and London: Norton, 2003. Print. Conan Doyle, Arthur. %%The Sign of Four%%. 1890. London Penguin, 2001. Print. (excerpts) %%Limitless%%. Dir. Neil Burger. Per. Bradley Cooper, Abbie Cornish, and Robert De Niro. 2011. Concorde, 2011. DVD. %%The Wolf of Wall Street%%. Dir. Martin Scorsese. Perf. Leonardo DiCaprio, Jonah Hill, and Margot Robbie. 2013. Universal, 2014. DVD.
Seminar 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.310 DS Directed Studies The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Miscellaneous - Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.007 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Wednesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 15/04/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Tobias Rohling
  • Bachelor
3.02.041 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 16/04/20)

Description:
Exercises - Dr. Julius Greve
  • Bachelor
3.02.004 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 14/04/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Malte Björn Peick
  • Bachelor
3.02.141 S The Historical Novel: Reconstructing the Past from Waverley to Wolf Hall Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 16/04/20)

Description:
http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/2020_The_Historical_Novel:_Reconstructing_the_Past_from_Waverley_to_Wolf_Hall http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/2020_The_Historical_Novel:_Reconstructing_the_Past_from_Waverley_to_Wolf_Hall
Seminar 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.151 S In the Break, In the Wake: An Introduction to Black Studies Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 15/04/20)

Description:
How to come to terms with the spaces and places of Black being in the social, political, and cultural circumstances of life in the United States? What is the status of human beings that have been described as “slaves,” “former slaves,” “Blacks,” Afro-Americans,” “African Americans,” or “people of color,” in American literature and culture? From the inception of the American Nation onward, has this status changed significantly? Is it possible to imagine a continuity in the historical development of the experience and disposition of Blackness in the U.S. in terms of issues concerning politics, ontology, aesthetics, and ethics? What are the conditions of possibility for Blackness, its oppression, and its expression? Taking its cue from two comparatively recent accounts of the idea and reality of Black life and culture in the U.S.—Fred Moten’s In the Break: The Aesthetics of the Black Radical Tradition (2003) and Christina Sharpe’s In the Wake: On Blackness and Being (2016)—this seminar seeks to examine both the continuities and the discontinuities in the history of what Moten terms “African America,” from slavery all the way to Black Lives Matter. The seminar thereby introduces a distinct array of literary and audiovisual forms of expression, from the works of Phillis Wheatley to M. NourbeSe Philip, from Robert Johnson to Curtis Mayfield, from Frederick Douglass to Octavia Butler, from Billie Holiday to Erykah Badu, from Gil Scott-Heron to Kanye West, from The Color Purple to Moonlight, and from Blaxploitation to Black Panther. Participants of this seminar will trace the discursive and practical frameworks that give rise to the difficult tensions between the expressions of racial violence and those of Black performance (DuBois, Baraka, Hartman, and Moten), and between the experience of modernity’s oppressive marginalization and being aware of one’s oppression as a principally excluded human being (Fanon, Wilderson, Spillers, and Sharpe). Aside from shorter texts, which will be made available at the start of the semester, the following books need to be purchased by the participants: - Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, Written by Himself - Octavia Butler, Kindred How to come to terms with the spaces and places of Black being in the social, political, and cultural circumstances of life in the United States? What is the status of human beings that have been described as “slaves,” “former slaves,” “Blacks,” Afro-Americans,” “African Americans,” or “people of color,” in American literature and culture? From the inception of the American Nation onward, has this status changed significantly? Is it possible to imagine a continuity in the historical development of the experience and disposition of Blackness in the U.S. in terms of issues concerning politics, ontology, aesthetics, and ethics? What are the conditions of possibility for Blackness, its oppression, and its expression? Taking its cue from two comparatively recent accounts of the idea and reality of Black life and culture in the U.S.—Fred Moten’s In the Break: The Aesthetics of the Black Radical Tradition (2003) and Christina Sharpe’s In the Wake: On Blackness and Being (2016)—this seminar seeks to examine both the continuities and the discontinuities in the history of what Moten terms “African America,” from slavery all the way to Black Lives Matter. The seminar thereby introduces a distinct array of literary and audiovisual forms of expression, from the works of Phillis Wheatley to M. NourbeSe Philip, from Robert Johnson to Curtis Mayfield, from Frederick Douglass to Octavia Butler, from Billie Holiday to Erykah Badu, from Gil Scott-Heron to Kanye West, from The Color Purple to Moonlight, and from Blaxploitation to Black Panther. Participants of this seminar will trace the discursive and practical frameworks that give rise to the difficult tensions between the expressions of racial violence and those of Black performance (DuBois, Baraka, Hartman, and Moten), and between the experience of modernity’s oppressive marginalization and being aware of one’s oppression as a principally excluded human being (Fanon, Wilderson, Spillers, and Sharpe). Aside from shorter texts, which will be made available at the start of the semester, the following books need to be purchased by the participants: - Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, Written by Himself - Octavia Butler, Kindred
Seminar - Dr. Julius Greve
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.306 KO New Research in British and Anglophone Literary and Cultural Studies Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 14/04/20)

Description:
Miscellaneous 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.996 BiliSAT The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Research group - Prof. Dr. Cornelia Hamann
Lina Abed Ibrahim, M.A.
3.02.950 S The Faculty of Language Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 16/04/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Cornelia Hamann
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.404 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Designing Reading Materials Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 20/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.308 KO Anglistisches-Amerikanistisches Forschungskolloquium Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 23/04/20)

Description:
Colloquium - Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
in Bearbeitung
3.02.029 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 21/04/20)
Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 12/06/20)

Description:
Exercises 4 Alena Jansen
  • Bachelor
3.02.182 S English Phonology Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 15/04/20)

Description:
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Marcel Schlechtweg
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.078 (k) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Discovering Canadian Culture Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 16/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
3.02.042 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 23/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
3.02.315 DS Directed Studies The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Miscellaneous - Dr. Julius Greve
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.012 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Tuesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 14/04/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Kim Ahrens
  • Bachelor
3.02.079 (d) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: The United States Tuesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 21/04/20)

Description:
The “Academic Speaking and Writing Skills” courses make up the second part of the Sprachpraxis module ang080. These are practical courses geared toward teaching you how to give effective presentations in an academic setting and developing your academic writing ability, as well as introducing the culture, language and society of the United States of America. In this course, you will prepare and give a short presentation, lead a discussion activity, write an in-class writing task as well as complete language assignments focussing on useful language for academic speaking and writing. As with “Introduction to Integrated Language Skills”, the course is graded on a pass-fail basis. The “Academic Speaking and Writing Skills” courses make up the second part of the Sprachpraxis module ang080. These are practical courses geared toward teaching you how to give effective presentations in an academic setting and developing your academic writing ability, as well as introducing the culture, language and society of the United States of America. In this course, you will prepare and give a short presentation, lead a discussion activity, write an in-class writing task as well as complete language assignments focussing on useful language for academic speaking and writing. As with “Introduction to Integrated Language Skills”, the course is graded on a pass-fail basis.
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.02.140 S American Gothic: Edgar Allan Poe and Harriet Prescott Spofford Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 22/04/20)

Description:
This class focuses on two eminent writers of Gothic American literature in the nineteenth century: Edgar Allan Poe and Harriet Prescott Spofford. While Poe has long been acknowledged as key figure of this classic period of Gothic American literature, Harriet Prescott Spofford’s reputation and writings suffered the fate of those of many nineteenth-century women writers, who were well-known and widely read at their time: Spofford was forgotten until the 1980s, when revisionist scholars recovered many of her novels and short fiction. This course explores the American Gothic as a mode of narration and an aesthetic, including but not limited to its gendered concerns regarding individual and collective horrors, whether these are related to the human unconscious, body, or mind, or whether these are related to questions of empire, race, or the unknowability of supernatural and posthuman forces. As Stephen L. Crow states, the study of Gothic American literature “offers essential insights into the history and culture of the United States” (A Companion to American Gothic, 2014). Please purchase and read the following reading materials: Edgar Allan Poe’s The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket (1838), preferably the Broadview Press edition; and Harriet Prescott Spofford’s Sir Rohan’s Ghost (1860). Other reading materials and secondary literature will be available on Stud.IP at the beginning of the semester. This class focuses on two eminent writers of Gothic American literature in the nineteenth century: Edgar Allan Poe and Harriet Prescott Spofford. While Poe has long been acknowledged as key figure of this classic period of Gothic American literature, Harriet Prescott Spofford’s reputation and writings suffered the fate of those of many nineteenth-century women writers, who were well-known and widely read at their time: Spofford was forgotten until the 1980s, when revisionist scholars recovered many of her novels and short fiction. This course explores the American Gothic as a mode of narration and an aesthetic, including but not limited to its gendered concerns regarding individual and collective horrors, whether these are related to the human unconscious, body, or mind, or whether these are related to questions of empire, race, or the unknowability of supernatural and posthuman forces. As Stephen L. Crow states, the study of Gothic American literature “offers essential insights into the history and culture of the United States” (A Companion to American Gothic, 2014). Please purchase and read the following reading materials: Edgar Allan Poe’s The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket (1838), preferably the Broadview Press edition; and Harriet Prescott Spofford’s Sir Rohan’s Ghost (1860). Other reading materials and secondary literature will be available on Stud.IP at the beginning of the semester.
Seminar 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.014 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Thursday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 16/04/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Carina Hansen-Wilkens
  • Bachelor
3.02.113 Ü Written English: Language Education in Canada Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 15/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.072 (j) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Lands Down Under Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 16/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.104 Ü Spoken English: Higher Education in North America Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 20/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.204 S Multiculturalism and Literature Monday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 20/04/20)

Description:
The seminar provides an overview of postcolonial storytelling and the concept of multiculturalism followed by an analysis of a variety of literary products ranging from the early 80s to the present. Questions of national identity will be covered as well as cultural, political and religious issues. London as a hub of the British multicultural experience will be explored in greater detail. Excerpts from selected texts comprise works by e.g. - Salman Rushdie, Midnight Children, 1981 - Hanif Kureishi, The Buddha of Suburbia, 1990 - Hanif Kureishi, The Black Album, 1995 - Arundhati Roy, The God of the Small Things, 1997 - Zadie Smith, White Teeth, 2000 - Monica Ali, Brick Lane, 2000 - Rose Tremain, The Road Home, 2007 - Amanda Craig, Hearts and Minds, 2009 - John Lanchester, Capital, 2013 Each text will be analysed and assessed with regard to its suitability for classroom use. Excerpts from textbook units along with the accompanying tasks and media will be critically examined. Additional material from a variety of sources will be collected, presented and prepared for classroom use. Task design will be practiced by providing motivating challenges for young adult readers and learners of English. Comment: On successful completion of this module, students should - be familiar with the British Empire and the literature emerging from the post-colonial experience -know about London`s significance for contemporary multicultural life -be able to explain the role of English in post-colonial storytelling -be able to analyse narrative texts reflecting the multicultural experience -be familiar with the content and interpretation of the texts dealt with in class -be able to assess the viability of select texts for classroom use -be aware of the rules and regulations the Core Curriculum in Lower Saxony stipulates for the topic -be able to critically assess literary products for teaching purposes and, if necessary, modify and edit them - provide tasks accompanying literary texts reflecting the multicultural experience Participants are expected to: - Provide commentaries on topics discussed in class -Submit samples of work as part of a portfolio - Pass a written exam (“Klausur”) at the end of the semester as part of a portfolio The seminar provides an overview of postcolonial storytelling and the concept of multiculturalism followed by an analysis of a variety of literary products ranging from the early 80s to the present. Questions of national identity will be covered as well as cultural, political and religious issues. London as a hub of the British multicultural experience will be explored in greater detail. Excerpts from selected texts comprise works by e.g. - Salman Rushdie, Midnight Children, 1981 - Hanif Kureishi, The Buddha of Suburbia, 1990 - Hanif Kureishi, The Black Album, 1995 - Arundhati Roy, The God of the Small Things, 1997 - Zadie Smith, White Teeth, 2000 - Monica Ali, Brick Lane, 2000 - Rose Tremain, The Road Home, 2007 - Amanda Craig, Hearts and Minds, 2009 - John Lanchester, Capital, 2013 Each text will be analysed and assessed with regard to its suitability for classroom use. Excerpts from textbook units along with the accompanying tasks and media will be critically examined. Additional material from a variety of sources will be collected, presented and prepared for classroom use. Task design will be practiced by providing motivating challenges for young adult readers and learners of English. Comment: On successful completion of this module, students should - be familiar with the British Empire and the literature emerging from the post-colonial experience -know about London`s significance for contemporary multicultural life -be able to explain the role of English in post-colonial storytelling -be able to analyse narrative texts reflecting the multicultural experience -be familiar with the content and interpretation of the texts dealt with in class -be able to assess the viability of select texts for classroom use -be aware of the rules and regulations the Core Curriculum in Lower Saxony stipulates for the topic -be able to critically assess literary products for teaching purposes and, if necessary, modify and edit them - provide tasks accompanying literary texts reflecting the multicultural experience Participants are expected to: - Provide commentaries on topics discussed in class -Submit samples of work as part of a portfolio - Pass a written exam (“Klausur”) at the end of the semester as part of a portfolio
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.202 S Media Literacy in ELT Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 20/04/20)

Description:
Seminar - Dr. Birte Sause
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.077 (b) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Discovering Canadian Culture Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 14/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
3.02.114 Ü Written English: Reimagining education Wednesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 22/04/20)

Description:
Bring iPads into the classroom! Bring students out of the classroom! These days, there is no shortage of creative approaches to transforming school learning, and yet - the maxim 'teachers teach the way they were taught' still holds true, at least as a stereotype. Why is that the case? And how do we tell a short-lived fad from true innovation? In this Written English course, we will consider the merits of various non-traditional approaches to education and the obstacles in their way. This course forms one half of the compulsory module ang311: Integrated Language Skills. The module is assessed via a portfolio and the assessment requirements here are a take-home essay and a written language test. The grade will be added to the result from Spoken English. Homework assignments as required by the lecturer will count towards active participation. Bring iPads into the classroom! Bring students out of the classroom! These days, there is no shortage of creative approaches to transforming school learning, and yet - the maxim 'teachers teach the way they were taught' still holds true, at least as a stereotype. Why is that the case? And how do we tell a short-lived fad from true innovation? In this Written English course, we will consider the merits of various non-traditional approaches to education and the obstacles in their way. This course forms one half of the compulsory module ang311: Integrated Language Skills. The module is assessed via a portfolio and the assessment requirements here are a take-home essay and a written language test. The grade will be added to the result from Spoken English. Homework assignments as required by the lecturer will count towards active participation.
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.165 VL Research Methods in Theoretical and Applied Linguistics Friday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 24/04/20)

Description:
Lecture - Lina Abed Ibrahim, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.026 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 15/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Robert Sowa
  • Bachelor
3.02.003 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Monday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 20/04/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Carina Hansen-Wilkens
  • Bachelor
3.02.046 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 23/04/20)

Description:
Exercises - Dr. Julius Greve
  • Bachelor
3.02.076 (m) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: British and Irish Politics, History and Culture Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 24/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
3.02.070 (c) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Lands Down Under Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 14/04/20), Location: A10 1-121a
Dates on Thursday. 23.07.20 12:30 - 14:30, Location: A11 1-101 (Hörsaal B)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.005 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Tuesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 14/04/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Maik Harms
  • Bachelor
3.02.130 S Don’t Contaminate Me! Epidemics and Pandemics in American History and Popular Culture The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.035 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Monday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 20/04/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Thorben Höppner
  • Bachelor
3.02.482 Teaching Literature in the EFL Classroom Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 15/04/20)

Description:
Teaching literature in the EFL Classroom Amongst the current generation of teaching professionals, the question whether literature – both with a capital and a small `l´- should be used in the EFL classroom is usually answered with a resounding “yes!”. For years critics of the competence-based approach have been calling for literature to be re-established as a means of fostering an education that goes beyond a mere acquisition of a certain skill set. In our digital age the number of literary texts available online as well as the products emerging from the communication between readers, texts and authors open up new types of literary discourse and expression transcending age, nationality and educational background. On the other hand, future teachers of English are bound to come across restrictions regarding their choice of literary works as well as the topics connected to them. German Abitur exams in particular require close scrutiny of the curriculum. Set texts and a variety of linguistic and analytical skills will be required to meet the assessment standards stipulated by the Ministry of Education. From primary school through to the final years of secondary school and Abitur-level both extensive reading of literary texts as well as reading with a view of composing a piece of writing are expected to be fostered systematically. The seminar aims at providing an overview of different literary texts, approaches and methods viable in the EFL classroom. Starting with visualisation techniques, story telling, scenic interpretation and creative writing participants are expected to get actively involved in classes by creating their own literary products and exchanging ideas about the viability of different didactic approaches. Other than that, everyone will be required to provide short keynote presentations on a selection of topics connected to teaching literature. You can put your name down for topics from the second week of term. Against the backdrop of current research in Didactics, participants are expected to analyse teaching and learning materials as well as (excerpts from) current textbooks for various age groups. Different approaches towards teaching literature will be explored. The development of units of work and lesson plans will be informed by relevant theories of language learning and teaching and can be critically applied to a selection of tasks, resources and ideas for projects connected to teaching literature. Lesson planning and the analysis of lessons involves • realistic target setting, • allowing for differentiation, • an appropriate choice of materials and media • as well as devising appropriate assessment strategies. Schemes of work submitted by students will be put under close scrutiny by peers and the lecturer in order to determine their viability in the classroom. Ideally, concepts and strategies will be put into practice during subsequent internships. As regards the submission of coursework as part of your final assessment, all participants are required to hand in a portfolio showing their ability to plan and reflect on lessons and schemes of work or tasks. Teaching literature in the EFL Classroom Amongst the current generation of teaching professionals, the question whether literature – both with a capital and a small `l´- should be used in the EFL classroom is usually answered with a resounding “yes!”. For years critics of the competence-based approach have been calling for literature to be re-established as a means of fostering an education that goes beyond a mere acquisition of a certain skill set. In our digital age the number of literary texts available online as well as the products emerging from the communication between readers, texts and authors open up new types of literary discourse and expression transcending age, nationality and educational background. On the other hand, future teachers of English are bound to come across restrictions regarding their choice of literary works as well as the topics connected to them. German Abitur exams in particular require close scrutiny of the curriculum. Set texts and a variety of linguistic and analytical skills will be required to meet the assessment standards stipulated by the Ministry of Education. From primary school through to the final years of secondary school and Abitur-level both extensive reading of literary texts as well as reading with a view of composing a piece of writing are expected to be fostered systematically. The seminar aims at providing an overview of different literary texts, approaches and methods viable in the EFL classroom. Starting with visualisation techniques, story telling, scenic interpretation and creative writing participants are expected to get actively involved in classes by creating their own literary products and exchanging ideas about the viability of different didactic approaches. Other than that, everyone will be required to provide short keynote presentations on a selection of topics connected to teaching literature. You can put your name down for topics from the second week of term. Against the backdrop of current research in Didactics, participants are expected to analyse teaching and learning materials as well as (excerpts from) current textbooks for various age groups. Different approaches towards teaching literature will be explored. The development of units of work and lesson plans will be informed by relevant theories of language learning and teaching and can be critically applied to a selection of tasks, resources and ideas for projects connected to teaching literature. Lesson planning and the analysis of lessons involves • realistic target setting, • allowing for differentiation, • an appropriate choice of materials and media • as well as devising appropriate assessment strategies. Schemes of work submitted by students will be put under close scrutiny by peers and the lecturer in order to determine their viability in the classroom. Ideally, concepts and strategies will be put into practice during subsequent internships. As regards the submission of coursework as part of your final assessment, all participants are required to hand in a portfolio showing their ability to plan and reflect on lessons and schemes of work or tasks.
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.013 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Wednesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 15/04/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Michelle Kerkhoff
  • Bachelor
3.02.191 S Making Learning Visible in the EFL Classroom Monday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 20/04/20)

Description:
On successful completion of this module, students should - be familiar with current research in the field of evidence-based teaching, especially John Hattie`s Visible Learning and Visible Learning for Teachers -be able to explain the difference between competence-based teaching as opposed to instructive approaches -be familiar with the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) and be able to explain its significance and the impact it has had on language teaching -know and be able to analyze syllabuses and curricula aimed at different age and ability groups -be able to develop and evaluate lesson plans relying on the task-based approach but also on “classical” ways of lesson planning (PPP) - be able to critically consider a variety of assessment methods suitable for classroom use -be able to plan for differentiation in accordance with the syllabus -be able to comment on “real-life” case studies of individuals and groups of language learners thus practicing their diagnostic skills -make informed decisions on methods, seating, use of media etc. in light of current research-be aware of the way culture shapes attitudes towards (language) -learning and teaching and develop realistic goals for intercultural skills and communication, both in the classroom and beyond Participants are expected to: -provide commentaries on topics discussed in class -submit samples of work as part of a portfolio -pass a written exam (“Klausur”) at the end of the semester as part of a portfolio On successful completion of this module, students should - be familiar with current research in the field of evidence-based teaching, especially John Hattie`s Visible Learning and Visible Learning for Teachers -be able to explain the difference between competence-based teaching as opposed to instructive approaches -be familiar with the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) and be able to explain its significance and the impact it has had on language teaching -know and be able to analyze syllabuses and curricula aimed at different age and ability groups -be able to develop and evaluate lesson plans relying on the task-based approach but also on “classical” ways of lesson planning (PPP) - be able to critically consider a variety of assessment methods suitable for classroom use -be able to plan for differentiation in accordance with the syllabus -be able to comment on “real-life” case studies of individuals and groups of language learners thus practicing their diagnostic skills -make informed decisions on methods, seating, use of media etc. in light of current research-be aware of the way culture shapes attitudes towards (language) -learning and teaching and develop realistic goals for intercultural skills and communication, both in the classroom and beyond Participants are expected to: -provide commentaries on topics discussed in class -submit samples of work as part of a portfolio -pass a written exam (“Klausur”) at the end of the semester as part of a portfolio
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.312 KO Doing Research in Didactics Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 15/04/20)

Description:
This course is designed for students preparing to write their final thesis (BA or MA) in the field of Didactics. Looking for suitable and, above all, viable topics, presenting first ideas and subsequently coming up with a plan on how to carry out your actual research will be at the centre of the preparatory process. Candidates will be required to submit and present different types of documents, e.g. literature overview, research proposal, abstract, etc. You will be working independently outside class, preparing findings to peers and supervisors on a regular basis. Standards of academic research and writing will be discussed in plenary sessions. Students are expected to use feedback constructively and thus gradually commit to a final version of their research project. This course is designed for students preparing to write their final thesis (BA or MA) in the field of Didactics. Looking for suitable and, above all, viable topics, presenting first ideas and subsequently coming up with a plan on how to carry out your actual research will be at the centre of the preparatory process. Candidates will be required to submit and present different types of documents, e.g. literature overview, research proposal, abstract, etc. You will be working independently outside class, preparing findings to peers and supervisors on a regular basis. Standards of academic research and writing will be discussed in plenary sessions. Students are expected to use feedback constructively and thus gradually commit to a final version of their research project.
Miscellaneous 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.998 S Multiple Imaginations: Germany's Pasts and Presents Dates on Friday. 03.07.20 16:00 - 20:00, Saturday. 04.07.20 - Sunday. 05.07.20 10:00 - 19:00
Description:
In this seminar, we will work on different narratives about and representations of what is imagined – in different times and under different (political, social, economic) circumstances – as ‘Germany’. We will explore what ‘Germany’ supposedly is and gain a deeper understanding of it. With a cultural studies perspective we will look at what and who is represented by whom as ‘German(y)’, who and what is excluded by the narratives, what the specific circumstances for specific narratives are, and which counter-narratives can be found. The aim of the seminar is not to study what is called ‘Germany’ or ‘Europe’ but to learn about representation and perspectives of (multiple) self-imaginations, how they are constructed in different narratives and which functions these imaginations serve. In the context of this seminar, we do a joint study trip to the Auswandererhaus in Bremerhaven to explore different narratives and representations about Germany’s past and present. With a selection of texts and short films we will examine issues of exclusion and inclusion, and their implications. In this seminar, we will work on different narratives about and representations of what is imagined – in different times and under different (political, social, economic) circumstances – as ‘Germany’. We will explore what ‘Germany’ supposedly is and gain a deeper understanding of it. With a cultural studies perspective we will look at what and who is represented by whom as ‘German(y)’, who and what is excluded by the narratives, what the specific circumstances for specific narratives are, and which counter-narratives can be found. The aim of the seminar is not to study what is called ‘Germany’ or ‘Europe’ but to learn about representation and perspectives of (multiple) self-imaginations, how they are constructed in different narratives and which functions these imaginations serve. In the context of this seminar, we do a joint study trip to the Auswandererhaus in Bremerhaven to explore different narratives and representations about Germany’s past and present. With a selection of texts and short films we will examine issues of exclusion and inclusion, and their implications.
Seminar - Lea Brenningmeyer
Tobias Linnemann
Sunday Omwenyeke
3.02.082 (l) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: The United States Thursday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 23/04/20)

Description:
The “Academic Speaking and Writing Skills” courses make up the second part of the Sprachpraxis module ang080. These are practical courses geared toward teaching you how to give effective presentations in an academic setting and developing your academic writing ability, as well as introducing the culture, language and society of the United States of America. In this course, you will prepare and give a short presentation, lead a discussion activity, write an in-class writing task as well as complete language assignments focussing on useful language for academic speaking and writing. As with “Introduction to Integrated Language Skills”, the course is graded on a pass-fail basis. The “Academic Speaking and Writing Skills” courses make up the second part of the Sprachpraxis module ang080. These are practical courses geared toward teaching you how to give effective presentations in an academic setting and developing your academic writing ability, as well as introducing the culture, language and society of the United States of America. In this course, you will prepare and give a short presentation, lead a discussion activity, write an in-class writing task as well as complete language assignments focussing on useful language for academic speaking and writing. As with “Introduction to Integrated Language Skills”, the course is graded on a pass-fail basis.
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.02.075 (i) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: British and Irish Politics, History and Culture Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 23/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
3.02.951 S Language Comparisons Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 16/04/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Cornelia Hamann
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.028 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 21/04/20)
Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 10/06/20)

Description:
Exercises 4 Rabea Thorwesten
  • Bachelor
3.02.047 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 17/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.02.025 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 11/06/20)
Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 23/04/20)
Dates on Tuesday. 26.05.20 14:00 - 16:00

Description:
Exercises 4 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
3.02.105 Ü Spoken English: Higher Education in North America Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 14/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.318 DS Directed Studies The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Miscellaneous - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.601 Ü Begleitveranstaltung für TutorInnen der Anglistik/ Amerikanistik: Linguistik/ Sprachwissenschaft The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Exercises - Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.071 (h) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Lands Down Under Wednesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 15/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.111 Ü Written English: British Asian Cinema Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 22/04/20)

Description:
British Asian cinema has its roots in the Black politics of the 1960s and '70s when a new wave of politically active filmmakers began to use film to challenge racism and create greater awareness of issues facing their communities, such as poverty and social exclusion. British Asian films, in keeping with these roots, focus on the position of South-Asian communities in Britain, and on the complex experiences of second generation British Asians growing up with both cultures. Key issues are conforming to, or rejecting, aspects of both cultures, often centering on religion, “arranged marriage”, intergenerational conflict, gender expectations, sexuality and racism. - This Written English course forms one half of the compulsory module ang311: Integrated Language Skills. The module is assessed via a portfolio and the assessment requirements are a take-home essay, an edited version of this essay, and a written language test. The grade will be added to the result from Spoken English. Homework assignments as required by the lecturer will count towards active participation. ASSESSMENT: 50% language based, 50% content based. British Asian cinema has its roots in the Black politics of the 1960s and '70s when a new wave of politically active filmmakers began to use film to challenge racism and create greater awareness of issues facing their communities, such as poverty and social exclusion. British Asian films, in keeping with these roots, focus on the position of South-Asian communities in Britain, and on the complex experiences of second generation British Asians growing up with both cultures. Key issues are conforming to, or rejecting, aspects of both cultures, often centering on religion, “arranged marriage”, intergenerational conflict, gender expectations, sexuality and racism. - This Written English course forms one half of the compulsory module ang311: Integrated Language Skills. The module is assessed via a portfolio and the assessment requirements are a take-home essay, an edited version of this essay, and a written language test. The grade will be added to the result from Spoken English. Homework assignments as required by the lecturer will count towards active participation. ASSESSMENT: 50% language based, 50% content based.
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.043 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 23/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
3.02.002 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Monday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 20/04/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Sarah Kaltofen
  • Bachelor
3.02.100 Ü Spoken English: Food, glorious food (a) Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 21/04/20)
Dates on Tuesday. 21.07.20 10:00 - 12:00

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.103 Ü Spoken English: Food, glorious food (b) Wednesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 22/04/20)
Dates on Wednesday. 22.07.20 18:00 - 20:00

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.008 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 16/04/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Michelle Kerkhoff
  • Bachelor
3.02.990 S Science on TV and Film The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.402 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Working with Grammar and Vocabulary Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 20/04/20)
Dates on Monday. 20.07.20 14:00 - 16:00

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.480 S Current Issues in ELT Monday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 20/04/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Master of Education
3.02.049 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 16/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Alena Cicholewski
  • Bachelor
3.02.483 Teaching Advanced EFL Classes Monday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 20/04/20)

Description:
This class aims at providing an overview of what teaching advanced EFL classes (B1-B2+) actually involves in terms of lesson preparation and assessment strategies. Using standardised tests as a starting point to sharpen one`s diagnostic skills, we shall then turn to different types of tasks designed to foster language learning and thus help pupils to reach a higher level on the CEFR scale. Due to the sheer scale of the various skills that need to be fosteredin an average EFL classroom, we shall focus our attention on different learning and teaching materials in order to critically assess whether they are actually fit for purpose. Consequently, designing adequate worksheets, tests and online resources will be the next step in an effort to improve teaching skills and to develop proper units of work (rather than "spur of the moment" teaching). Criteria of successful EFL teaching - both from Germany and the UK - will be applied to all the products designed in class in order to enhance lesson planning expertise. As EFL teachers in Germany are expected to deliver the national (KMK standards) and the regional curriculum (KC Niedersachsen), a rigorous study of the documents in question is required. By the end of term participants are expected to -provide a critical evaluation of a teaching resource (45 minute in-class test, mid-term) -use a (set of) material(s) provided by the lecturer to design a unit of work and lesson plan (long-term homework to be submitted after the Christmas break) -take part in classroom discourse by providing comments and results from academic reading -be able to critically examine lesson plans against the backdrop of the competence-based approach All these skills shall be demonstrated and displayed in a portfolio which will be awarded a final grade. This class aims at providing an overview of what teaching advanced EFL classes (B1-B2+) actually involves in terms of lesson preparation and assessment strategies. Using standardised tests as a starting point to sharpen one`s diagnostic skills, we shall then turn to different types of tasks designed to foster language learning and thus help pupils to reach a higher level on the CEFR scale. Due to the sheer scale of the various skills that need to be fosteredin an average EFL classroom, we shall focus our attention on different learning and teaching materials in order to critically assess whether they are actually fit for purpose. Consequently, designing adequate worksheets, tests and online resources will be the next step in an effort to improve teaching skills and to develop proper units of work (rather than "spur of the moment" teaching). Criteria of successful EFL teaching - both from Germany and the UK - will be applied to all the products designed in class in order to enhance lesson planning expertise. As EFL teachers in Germany are expected to deliver the national (KMK standards) and the regional curriculum (KC Niedersachsen), a rigorous study of the documents in question is required. By the end of term participants are expected to -provide a critical evaluation of a teaching resource (45 minute in-class test, mid-term) -use a (set of) material(s) provided by the lecturer to design a unit of work and lesson plan (long-term homework to be submitted after the Christmas break) -take part in classroom discourse by providing comments and results from academic reading -be able to critically examine lesson plans against the backdrop of the competence-based approach All these skills shall be demonstrated and displayed in a portfolio which will be awarded a final grade.
Seminar - Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.055 Repetitorium: Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Friday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 17/04/20)

Description:
Miscellaneous 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.02.190 S Intercultural Communicative Competence Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 14/04/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.040 V Historical Backgrounds and Critical Concepts Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 16/04/20)

Description:
Lecture 2 Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
Dr. Christian Lassen
Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.02.535 Ü Betreuung des Praxisblocks vor Ort im Fach Englisch (GHR) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Exercises - Edeltraud Breiter
  • Master of Education
3.02.602 Ü Begleitveranstaltung für TutorInnen der Anglistik/ Amerikanistik: Fachdidaktik Friday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 17/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.073 (a) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: British and Irish Politics, History and Culture Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 21/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
3.02.050 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 23/04/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Alena Cicholewski
  • Bachelor
3.02.024 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 11/06/20)
Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 23/04/20)
Dates on Tuesday. 26.05.20 14:00 - 16:00

Description:
Exercises 4 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
3.02.038 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Wednesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 15/04/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Patrick Therkorn
  • Bachelor
3.02.930 S Interlanguage Pragmatics Monday: 08:00 - 11:00, weekly (from 20/04/20)

Description:
Seminar 3 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.220 S Screening Europe: Representations of Europe in US-American Film and TV Dates on Saturday. 09.05.20, Saturday. 13.06.20 - Sunday. 14.06.20 10:00 - 17:00
Description:
“I may not know much but I do know that Europeans love Americans.” This is what Peter Parker’s sidekick Ned tells him as they set off on their school trip to Europe in the new "Spider-Man: Far from Home" movie (2019). This is just one example of a common trope in US-American film: the trip to Europe. Some US-American TV series also dedicate special “vacation episodes” to certain cities in Europe (e.g. "Friends," "Parks and Recreation," or "Gossip Girl"). In each of these cases, a certain notion of Europe, European cities, and Europeans is constructed. These notions often times include stereotypes, myths, and romantic ideas, e.g., sexual freedom, cheap alcohol, and old castles. No matter how different the films and TV series are, each of these representations reproduces but also constructs an idea of Europe, certain parts of Europe, and the people who live there. In the seminar, we will have a look at different representations of Europe in film and TV. With a representation-critical approach and the methodological toolkit of film analysis, global perspectives of Europe or parts of Europe and what it means to be European will be examined and analyzed. Guiding questions will be inter alia: - How is Europe represented? - Which filmic devices are employed to construct or support a certain notion of Europe? - What is represented/suggested/identified as (stereo)typical European? - Which voices are heard, which are not? What is made visible and what remains invisible? The course is primarily geared towards international exchange students participating in the "European Studies in Global Perspectives" program, but it is also open to University of Oldenburg students. “I may not know much but I do know that Europeans love Americans.” This is what Peter Parker’s sidekick Ned tells him as they set off on their school trip to Europe in the new "Spider-Man: Far from Home" movie (2019). This is just one example of a common trope in US-American film: the trip to Europe. Some US-American TV series also dedicate special “vacation episodes” to certain cities in Europe (e.g. "Friends," "Parks and Recreation," or "Gossip Girl"). In each of these cases, a certain notion of Europe, European cities, and Europeans is constructed. These notions often times include stereotypes, myths, and romantic ideas, e.g., sexual freedom, cheap alcohol, and old castles. No matter how different the films and TV series are, each of these representations reproduces but also constructs an idea of Europe, certain parts of Europe, and the people who live there. In the seminar, we will have a look at different representations of Europe in film and TV. With a representation-critical approach and the methodological toolkit of film analysis, global perspectives of Europe or parts of Europe and what it means to be European will be examined and analyzed. Guiding questions will be inter alia: - How is Europe represented? - Which filmic devices are employed to construct or support a certain notion of Europe? - What is represented/suggested/identified as (stereo)typical European? - Which voices are heard, which are not? What is made visible and what remains invisible? The course is primarily geared towards international exchange students participating in the "European Studies in Global Perspectives" program, but it is also open to University of Oldenburg students.
Seminar - Lea Brenningmeyer
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
124 Seminars

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