Stud.IP Uni Oldenburg
University of Oldenburg
11.05.2021 22:47:38
Veranstaltungsverzeichnis

Institute of English and American Studies Click here for PDF-Download

Summer semester 2021 112 Seminars
VAK Course Number Title Type Lecture
Preliminary studies
Advanced courses
Practical course
Colloquium
Research group
Workgroup
Project group
Council conference
Internship
Language course
Subject didactics
Excursion
Tutorial
Committee
SWS Semester weekly hours Teachers Degree
3.02.114 Ü Written English: College Commencement Speeches Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.045 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
3.02.171 S History of the English Language Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
Seminar 2 Nils Rademacher
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.191 S The Plurilingual Classroom Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
Starting with (pre-service) teachers` individual language learning histories, the module is designed to explore the transition from conventional monolingual approaches towards a more flexible, plurilingual classroom practice. Identifying relevant models of intercultural communication, e.g. Byram (1997), influential research in the field of translanguaging, e.g. García (2009, 2017) and documents published by the European Council, pre- and in-service teachers are expected to use self-directed learning as a prerequisite for a thorough comprehension of topics in the field in order to display a sophisticated level of academic discourse in plenary sessions. The idea of a “flipped classroom” can be employed in order to facilitate pair and group work later on, i.e. when working on specific products. The whole course is designed to be process- and product-orientated. Hence, pre-service teachers are asked to share details of their learning process by uploading notes and comments to StudIP. While all participants are required to study all the reference mentioned in the teaching unit in order to reach the same standard of theoretical preparation, there is more choice when it comes to case studies and materials from classroom practice. Due to the complexity of the field, it is crucial to focus on a limited number of aspects connected to the plurilingual approach, while raising awareness for current research and influential documents such as the CEFR, FREPA, etc. In order to encourage interaction and collaboration among (future) FL teachers, tasks are designed to yield products such as infographics or (TED-talk style) presentations. Equipped with a sound basis of knowledge about plurilingual practices, higher thinking skills are encouraged in order to enable (future) teacher practitioners to quickly evaluate and adapt content. Therefore, command words such as “examine”, “evaluate” and “assess” frequently feature in the tasks chosen, particularly regarding essay and research questions. Upon the completion of the module, you will be (able to): -reflect on your own language learning histories using tools such as the ELP. -identify and assess resources designed to reflect and monitor your language learning development and the acquisition of plurilingual and pluricultural competence. -identify and describe innovative features of the CEFR (2001) and assess the significance of the document for the establishment of pluricultural practices. -display your findings in infographics. -name and evaluate the implications for teachers in their TESOL classroom practice. -consider advantages and disadvantages of translanguaging (and code-switching) in FL teaching. -identify and describe recent trends and developments in language learning, e.g. diversity education. -distinguish between bilingualism, multilingualism and plurilingualism. -critically assess the role of the native speaker ideal and its impact in FL teaching. -assess the CEFR Companion Volume`s significance for the development of plurilingual approaches. -define the term “Translanguaging Corriente” (Garcia 2013) and critically analyse its potential for a plurilingual classroom. -be aware of the interdependence between students` translanguaging performance and teachers` adaptive “Translanguaging Pedagogy” (García et al. 2017: 25). -grasp the differences between a conventional monolingual classroom and e.g. García`s ideas (2013, 2019) of “The Translanguaging Classroom”. -compare various classroom practices as reflected in lesson plans in order to become aware of the implications of translanguaging for classroom practitioners. Assessment issues: Participants are expected to -contribute to discourse during class. -provide samples of their work. -pass an end-of-term test (written assessment / “E-Klausur”) Starting with (pre-service) teachers` individual language learning histories, the module is designed to explore the transition from conventional monolingual approaches towards a more flexible, plurilingual classroom practice. Identifying relevant models of intercultural communication, e.g. Byram (1997), influential research in the field of translanguaging, e.g. García (2009, 2017) and documents published by the European Council, pre- and in-service teachers are expected to use self-directed learning as a prerequisite for a thorough comprehension of topics in the field in order to display a sophisticated level of academic discourse in plenary sessions. The idea of a “flipped classroom” can be employed in order to facilitate pair and group work later on, i.e. when working on specific products. The whole course is designed to be process- and product-orientated. Hence, pre-service teachers are asked to share details of their learning process by uploading notes and comments to StudIP. While all participants are required to study all the reference mentioned in the teaching unit in order to reach the same standard of theoretical preparation, there is more choice when it comes to case studies and materials from classroom practice. Due to the complexity of the field, it is crucial to focus on a limited number of aspects connected to the plurilingual approach, while raising awareness for current research and influential documents such as the CEFR, FREPA, etc. In order to encourage interaction and collaboration among (future) FL teachers, tasks are designed to yield products such as infographics or (TED-talk style) presentations. Equipped with a sound basis of knowledge about plurilingual practices, higher thinking skills are encouraged in order to enable (future) teacher practitioners to quickly evaluate and adapt content. Therefore, command words such as “examine”, “evaluate” and “assess” frequently feature in the tasks chosen, particularly regarding essay and research questions. Upon the completion of the module, you will be (able to): -reflect on your own language learning histories using tools such as the ELP. -identify and assess resources designed to reflect and monitor your language learning development and the acquisition of plurilingual and pluricultural competence. -identify and describe innovative features of the CEFR (2001) and assess the significance of the document for the establishment of pluricultural practices. -display your findings in infographics. -name and evaluate the implications for teachers in their TESOL classroom practice. -consider advantages and disadvantages of translanguaging (and code-switching) in FL teaching. -identify and describe recent trends and developments in language learning, e.g. diversity education. -distinguish between bilingualism, multilingualism and plurilingualism. -critically assess the role of the native speaker ideal and its impact in FL teaching. -assess the CEFR Companion Volume`s significance for the development of plurilingual approaches. -define the term “Translanguaging Corriente” (Garcia 2013) and critically analyse its potential for a plurilingual classroom. -be aware of the interdependence between students` translanguaging performance and teachers` adaptive “Translanguaging Pedagogy” (García et al. 2017: 25). -grasp the differences between a conventional monolingual classroom and e.g. García`s ideas (2013, 2019) of “The Translanguaging Classroom”. -compare various classroom practices as reflected in lesson plans in order to become aware of the implications of translanguaging for classroom practitioners. Assessment issues: Participants are expected to -contribute to discourse during class. -provide samples of their work. -pass an end-of-term test (written assessment / “E-Klausur”)
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.049 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Alena Cicholewski
  • Bachelor
3.02.025 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Robert Sowa
  • Bachelor
3.02.010 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Tuesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Tobias Rohling
  • Bachelor
3.02.175 V Methods in Language Use, Variation and Change Thursday: 14:00 - 15:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
The lecture “Methods in Language Variation and Change” accompanies one of the linguistic seminars in ang617/ang618 and is meant for students registered for these courses to develop basic methodological skills in the topic areas of language variation and change. Unlike many other disciplines in the humanities, linguistics has a very empirical research tradition. To get the data needed for empirical research, there are various methods of data collection which all come with a number of limitations and advantages. In this course, we will introduce and evaluate different methods of data collection, making you familiar with the advantages and disadvantages of them all and discuss critically the suitability for your research questions. In the lecture, we will guide students to develop different methodological skills and competences, such as: - the ability to formulate a valid (and manageable) research question - the ability to choose the appropriate approach to answering this research question (i.e. e.g. qualitative vs. quantitative research) - the ability to choose the appropriate method(s) of data collection to answer this question - the ability to choose the appropriate participants/ language corpus to answer this question - the ability to analyse the data - the ability to choose and present relevant results - the ability to structure linguistic papers - etc. The course is meant to give you a hands-on experience in working empirically yourself – from developing a research question to analysing and presenting your data. Therefore, the teaching methods in this course will vary from regular lectures in the first part to (individual) counselling and consultation about your own projects (be it posters, term papers or other kinds of examination). Students who registered for one of the linguistic seminars in ang617 also need to register for this lecture. The lecture “Methods in Language Variation and Change” accompanies one of the linguistic seminars in ang617/ang618 and is meant for students registered for these courses to develop basic methodological skills in the topic areas of language variation and change. Unlike many other disciplines in the humanities, linguistics has a very empirical research tradition. To get the data needed for empirical research, there are various methods of data collection which all come with a number of limitations and advantages. In this course, we will introduce and evaluate different methods of data collection, making you familiar with the advantages and disadvantages of them all and discuss critically the suitability for your research questions. In the lecture, we will guide students to develop different methodological skills and competences, such as: - the ability to formulate a valid (and manageable) research question - the ability to choose the appropriate approach to answering this research question (i.e. e.g. qualitative vs. quantitative research) - the ability to choose the appropriate method(s) of data collection to answer this question - the ability to choose the appropriate participants/ language corpus to answer this question - the ability to analyse the data - the ability to choose and present relevant results - the ability to structure linguistic papers - etc. The course is meant to give you a hands-on experience in working empirically yourself – from developing a research question to analysing and presenting your data. Therefore, the teaching methods in this course will vary from regular lectures in the first part to (individual) counselling and consultation about your own projects (be it posters, term papers or other kinds of examination). Students who registered for one of the linguistic seminars in ang617 also need to register for this lecture.
Lecture 1 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.035 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Tuesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Edda Hagemann
  • Bachelor
3.02.111 (Thu) Ü Written English: Writing about British Asian Cinema Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
British Asian cinema has its roots in the Black politics of the 1960s and '70s when a new wave of politically active filmmakers began to use film to challenge racism and create greater awareness of issues facing their communities, such as poverty and social exclusion. British Asian films, in keeping with these roots, focus on the position of South-Asian communities in Britain, and on the complex experiences of second generation British Asians growing up with both cultures. Key issues are conforming to, or rejecting, aspects of both cultures, often centering on religion, “arranged marriage”, intergenerational conflict, gender expectations, sexuality and racism. This Written English course forms one half of the compulsory module ang311: Integrated Language Skills. The module is assessed via a portfolio and the assessment requirements are a take-home essay and an edited version of this essay. The grade will be added to the result from Spoken English. Homework assignments as required by the lecturer will count towards active participation. British Asian cinema has its roots in the Black politics of the 1960s and '70s when a new wave of politically active filmmakers began to use film to challenge racism and create greater awareness of issues facing their communities, such as poverty and social exclusion. British Asian films, in keeping with these roots, focus on the position of South-Asian communities in Britain, and on the complex experiences of second generation British Asians growing up with both cultures. Key issues are conforming to, or rejecting, aspects of both cultures, often centering on religion, “arranged marriage”, intergenerational conflict, gender expectations, sexuality and racism. This Written English course forms one half of the compulsory module ang311: Integrated Language Skills. The module is assessed via a portfolio and the assessment requirements are a take-home essay and an edited version of this essay. The grade will be added to the result from Spoken English. Homework assignments as required by the lecturer will count towards active participation.
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.201 S Multiculturalism and Literature Monday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
The seminar provides an overview of postcolonial storytelling and the concept of multiculturalism followed by an analysis of a variety of literary products ranging from the early 80s to the present. Questions of national identity will be covered as well as cultural, political and religious issues. London as a hub of the British multicultural experience will be explored in greater detail. Excerpts from selected texts comprise works by e.g. - Hanif Kureishi, The Buddha of Suburbia, 1990 - Hanif Kureishi, The Black Album, 1995 - Arundhati Roy, The God of the Small Things, 1997 - Zadie Smith, White Teeth, 2000 - Monica Ali, Brick Lane, 2000 - Rose Tremain, The Road Home, 2007 - Amanda Craig, Hearts and Minds, 2009 - John Lanchester, Capital, 2013 Each text will be analysed and assessed with regard to its suitability for classroom use. Excerpts from textbook units along with the accompanying tasks and media will be critically examined. Additional material from a variety of sources will be collected, presented and prepared for classroom use. Task design will be practiced by providing motivating challenges for young adult readers and learners of English. Recent discussions on Britains colonial past and the "black-lives-matter" discussion will also be taken into account. Relevant reading in this field comprises: -Akala, Natives. Race & Class in the Ruins of the Empire (2018) -Eddo-Lodge, R. Why I`m No Longer Talking to White People About Race (2018) -Hirsch, A., British. On Race, IIdentitty and Belonging (2018) -Shukla, N. (Ed.) The Good Immigrant (2016) - On successful completion of this module, students should - be familiar with the British Empire and the literature emerging from the post-colonial experience -know about London`s significance for contemporary multicultural life -be able to explain the role of English in post-colonial storytelling -be able to analyse narrative texts reflecting the multicultural experience -be familiar with the content and interpretation of the texts dealt with in class -be able to assess the viability of select texts for classroom use -be aware of the rules and regulations the Core Curriculum in Lower Saxony stipulates for the topic -be able to critically assess literary products for teaching purposes and, if necessary, modify and edit them - provide tasks accompanying literary texts reflecting the multicultural experience Participants are expected to: - provide commentaries on topics discussed in class. -submit samples of work -pass a test at the end of term. The seminar provides an overview of postcolonial storytelling and the concept of multiculturalism followed by an analysis of a variety of literary products ranging from the early 80s to the present. Questions of national identity will be covered as well as cultural, political and religious issues. London as a hub of the British multicultural experience will be explored in greater detail. Excerpts from selected texts comprise works by e.g. - Hanif Kureishi, The Buddha of Suburbia, 1990 - Hanif Kureishi, The Black Album, 1995 - Arundhati Roy, The God of the Small Things, 1997 - Zadie Smith, White Teeth, 2000 - Monica Ali, Brick Lane, 2000 - Rose Tremain, The Road Home, 2007 - Amanda Craig, Hearts and Minds, 2009 - John Lanchester, Capital, 2013 Each text will be analysed and assessed with regard to its suitability for classroom use. Excerpts from textbook units along with the accompanying tasks and media will be critically examined. Additional material from a variety of sources will be collected, presented and prepared for classroom use. Task design will be practiced by providing motivating challenges for young adult readers and learners of English. Recent discussions on Britains colonial past and the "black-lives-matter" discussion will also be taken into account. Relevant reading in this field comprises: -Akala, Natives. Race & Class in the Ruins of the Empire (2018) -Eddo-Lodge, R. Why I`m No Longer Talking to White People About Race (2018) -Hirsch, A., British. On Race, IIdentitty and Belonging (2018) -Shukla, N. (Ed.) The Good Immigrant (2016) - On successful completion of this module, students should - be familiar with the British Empire and the literature emerging from the post-colonial experience -know about London`s significance for contemporary multicultural life -be able to explain the role of English in post-colonial storytelling -be able to analyse narrative texts reflecting the multicultural experience -be familiar with the content and interpretation of the texts dealt with in class -be able to assess the viability of select texts for classroom use -be aware of the rules and regulations the Core Curriculum in Lower Saxony stipulates for the topic -be able to critically assess literary products for teaching purposes and, if necessary, modify and edit them - provide tasks accompanying literary texts reflecting the multicultural experience Participants are expected to: - provide commentaries on topics discussed in class. -submit samples of work -pass a test at the end of term.
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.313 DS Directed Studies The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
miscellaneous - Dr. Galena Hashhozheva
  • Bachelor
3.02.161 S Dual Language Development: Interlanguages, Attrition and Impairment Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
This class deals with the typical and atypical development of more than one language in the broad sense, from birth or successively. Since bilinguals seldom use their languages in a balanced way, different dominance patterns arise and change over the lifespan, including the forgetting of the first language, referred to as language attrition - a phenomenon which is viewed as related to the acquisition of an L2. We will look at various developmental settings, different language phenomena and consider the impact of cross-linguistic differences on attrition and acquisition. By the end of the term students will be able to give an elaborate description of the phenomena of bilingualism in question and the factors of influence involved. This class deals with the typical and atypical development of more than one language in the broad sense, from birth or successively. Since bilinguals seldom use their languages in a balanced way, different dominance patterns arise and change over the lifespan, including the forgetting of the first language, referred to as language attrition - a phenomenon which is viewed as related to the acquisition of an L2. We will look at various developmental settings, different language phenomena and consider the impact of cross-linguistic differences on attrition and acquisition. By the end of the term students will be able to give an elaborate description of the phenomena of bilingualism in question and the factors of influence involved.
Seminar 2 Dr. Dobrinka Genevska-Hanke
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.220 S Screening Europe: Representations of Europe in US-American Film, TV, and Poetry Friday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 07/05/21), Class meeting (online)

Description:
“I may not know much but I do know that Europeans love Americans.” This is what Peter Parker’s sidekick Ned tells him as they set off on their school trip to Europe in the new "Spider-Man: Far from Home" movie (2019). This is just one example of a common trope in US-American film: the trip to Europe. Some US-American TV series also dedicate special “vacation episodes” to certain cities in Europe (e.g. "Friends," "Parks and Recreation," or "How I Met Your Mother"). In each of these cases, a certain notion of Europe, European cities, and Europeans is constructed. These notions often times include stereotypes, myths, and romantic ideas, e.g., sexual freedom, cheap alcohol, and old castles. No matter how different the films and TV series are, each of these representations reproduces but also constructs an idea of Europe, certain parts of Europe, and the people who live there. In the seminar, we will have a look at different representations of Europe in film and TV. With a representation-critical approach and the methodological toolkit of film analysis, global perspectives of Europe or parts of Europe and what it means to be European will be examined and analyzed. Guiding questions will be inter alia: - How is Europe represented? - Which filmic devices are employed to construct or support a certain notion of Europe? - What is represented/suggested/identified as (stereo)typical European? - Which voices are heard, which are not? What is made visible and what remains invisible? The course is primarily geared towards international exchange students participating in the "European Studies in Global Perspectives" program, but it is also open to University of Oldenburg students. “I may not know much but I do know that Europeans love Americans.” This is what Peter Parker’s sidekick Ned tells him as they set off on their school trip to Europe in the new "Spider-Man: Far from Home" movie (2019). This is just one example of a common trope in US-American film: the trip to Europe. Some US-American TV series also dedicate special “vacation episodes” to certain cities in Europe (e.g. "Friends," "Parks and Recreation," or "How I Met Your Mother"). In each of these cases, a certain notion of Europe, European cities, and Europeans is constructed. These notions often times include stereotypes, myths, and romantic ideas, e.g., sexual freedom, cheap alcohol, and old castles. No matter how different the films and TV series are, each of these representations reproduces but also constructs an idea of Europe, certain parts of Europe, and the people who live there. In the seminar, we will have a look at different representations of Europe in film and TV. With a representation-critical approach and the methodological toolkit of film analysis, global perspectives of Europe or parts of Europe and what it means to be European will be examined and analyzed. Guiding questions will be inter alia: - How is Europe represented? - Which filmic devices are employed to construct or support a certain notion of Europe? - What is represented/suggested/identified as (stereo)typical European? - Which voices are heard, which are not? What is made visible and what remains invisible? The course is primarily geared towards international exchange students participating in the "European Studies in Global Perspectives" program, but it is also open to University of Oldenburg students.
Seminar - Michal Musialowski
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.970 S “Science & Literature”: Evolution and the Novel The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.301 KO Abschlusskolloquium: BA, MEd, DoktorandInnen, Projektband (Vor-/Nachbereitung) Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.074 (Thu 8:00) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: British and Irish Politics, History and Culture Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
3.02.071 Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Lands Down Under Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.055 Repetitorium: Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Friday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 16/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.02.998 S Multiple Imaginations: Germany's Pasts and Presents Dates on Friday. 25.06.21 - Sunday. 27.06.21 10:00 - 16:00
Description:
In this seminar, we will work on different narratives about and representations of what is imagined – in different times and under different (political, social, economic) circumstances – as ‘Germany’. We will explore what ‘Germany’ supposedly is and gain a deeper understanding of it. With a cultural studies perspective we will look at what and who is represented by whom as ‘German(y)’, who and what is excluded by the narratives, what the specific circumstances for specific narratives are, and which counter-narratives can be found. The aim of the seminar is not to study what is called ‘Germany’ or ‘Europe’ but to learn about representation and perspectives of (multiple) self-imaginations, how they are constructed in different narratives and which functions these imaginations serve. In the context of this seminar, we do a joint study trip to the Auswandererhaus in Bremerhaven to explore different narratives and representations about Germany’s past and present. With a selection of texts and short films we will examine issues of exclusion and inclusion, and their implications. In this seminar, we will work on different narratives about and representations of what is imagined – in different times and under different (political, social, economic) circumstances – as ‘Germany’. We will explore what ‘Germany’ supposedly is and gain a deeper understanding of it. With a cultural studies perspective we will look at what and who is represented by whom as ‘German(y)’, who and what is excluded by the narratives, what the specific circumstances for specific narratives are, and which counter-narratives can be found. The aim of the seminar is not to study what is called ‘Germany’ or ‘Europe’ but to learn about representation and perspectives of (multiple) self-imaginations, how they are constructed in different narratives and which functions these imaginations serve. In the context of this seminar, we do a joint study trip to the Auswandererhaus in Bremerhaven to explore different narratives and representations about Germany’s past and present. With a selection of texts and short films we will examine issues of exclusion and inclusion, and their implications.
Seminar - Sunday Omwenyeke
Michal Musialowski
3.02.047 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
3.02.521 Ü Begleitung und Nachbereitung der Praxisphase GHR 300 im Unterrichtsfach Englisch Friday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 16/04/21)
Dates on Friday. 26.02.21, Friday. 05.03.21, Friday. 12.03.21, Friday. 26.03.21 12:00 - 14:00, Monday. 12.07.21 - Tuesday. 13.07.21 08:00 - 16:00

Description:
Exercises 1 Edeltraud Breiter
Alexandra Köhler
Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Master of Education
3.02.151 S Imagining Extinction: Paleontology, Deep Time, and the Return of Vanished Species in Anglophone Literature and Popular Culture Monday: 13:00 - 15:00, weekly (from 17/05/21), Group A (asynchronous participation also possible)
Friday: 09:00 - 11:00, weekly (from 21/05/21), Group B (asynchronous participation also possible)

Description:
Seminar - Dr. Michael Fuchs
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.006 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Thursday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Malte Björn Peick
  • Bachelor
3.02.404 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Designing Reading Materials (12-14) Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.309 KO Language Use, Variation and Change: Fach Anglistik/ Englisch Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.103 Ü Spoken English: Higher Education in North America (Mon) Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.200 S Media Literacy in ELT Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Birte Sause
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.007 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Malte Björn Peick
  • Bachelor
3.02.190 S Intercultural Communicative Competence Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.172 S Beginnings of English: Old English Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
“Hwæt sceolan we drinkan?”, what looks like an odd mixture of English and German is actually correct English – just more or less 1300 years old. One can still rather easily recognize the interrogative pronoun “what” only that the “hw” is nowadays reversed. “Sceolan” is probably a little hard to decipher at first glance, however at least for German natives it should – especially in combination with the last word of the question – be quickly identifiable as the equivalent to Modern English “shall” (or sollen – in OE the “sc” was pronounced as “sh”). The fellow who phrased this particular question therefore spoke perfect (Old) English, and yet how come that it looks more like a heavy German dialect than proper English? This issue will be one of the leading questions for this seminar. Where did the English language come from? Why is it even called English? Where did the languages before English go? Was there something like an “Old English period”? To answer those (and other questions) a period of language history lasting around 800 years will be examined. The focus will thereby not only lay with understanding the basics of Old English spelling, phonology and surface structure, but also in identifying key concepts of language contact and language change and how they have left traces within the everyday language we use. “Hwæt sceolan we drinkan?”, what looks like an odd mixture of English and German is actually correct English – just more or less 1300 years old. One can still rather easily recognize the interrogative pronoun “what” only that the “hw” is nowadays reversed. “Sceolan” is probably a little hard to decipher at first glance, however at least for German natives it should – especially in combination with the last word of the question – be quickly identifiable as the equivalent to Modern English “shall” (or sollen – in OE the “sc” was pronounced as “sh”). The fellow who phrased this particular question therefore spoke perfect (Old) English, and yet how come that it looks more like a heavy German dialect than proper English? This issue will be one of the leading questions for this seminar. Where did the English language come from? Why is it even called English? Where did the languages before English go? Was there something like an “Old English period”? To answer those (and other questions) a period of language history lasting around 800 years will be examined. The focus will thereby not only lay with understanding the basics of Old English spelling, phonology and surface structure, but also in identifying key concepts of language contact and language change and how they have left traces within the everyday language we use.
Seminar 2 Nils Rademacher
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.042 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Friday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 16/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.02.011 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 16/04/21)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Sarah Kaltofen
  • Bachelor
3.02.003 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Michelle Kerkhoff
  • Bachelor
3.02.100 Ü Spoken English: Food, glorious food Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.931 S Lexical Semantics Thursday: 17:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Seminar 3 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.101 (Tue) Ü Spoken English: Germany Through an Anglophone Lens Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
“Admiration, antagonism & ambivalence” was what characterized British images of Germany before WWI according to the historian Richard Scully. This course explores representations of Germany, its people and its language, and how these images have changed historically. We will explore contexts such as Tatort, German citizenship classes, the World Cup, the German language according to Mark Twain, and stereotypes of Germany in the Anglophone press. The assessment requirement for this Spoken English course is an oral language test at the end of the semester, with the grade to be added to the result from Written English. A podcast and group discussions will count towards active participation and will provide students with valuable language feedback. “Admiration, antagonism & ambivalence” was what characterized British images of Germany before WWI according to the historian Richard Scully. This course explores representations of Germany, its people and its language, and how these images have changed historically. We will explore contexts such as Tatort, German citizenship classes, the World Cup, the German language according to Mark Twain, and stereotypes of Germany in the Anglophone press. The assessment requirement for this Spoken English course is an oral language test at the end of the semester, with the grade to be added to the result from Written English. A podcast and group discussions will count towards active participation and will provide students with valuable language feedback.
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.602 Ü Begleitveranstaltung für TutorInnen der Anglistik/ Amerikanistik: Fachdidaktik Friday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 16/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 1 Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.121 S Paradise Lost: A Reading Course Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Galena Hashhozheva
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.997 Ü English Language Help Centre Monday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
3.02.022 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.601 Ü Begleitveranstaltung für TutorInnen der Anglistik/ Amerikanistik: Linguistik/ Sprachwissenschaft The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Exercises - Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.930 S World Englishes Thursday: 14:00 - 17:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Seminar 3 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.021 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.080 Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: The United States (Do., 16-18) Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.02.036 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Sarah Kaltofen
  • Bachelor
3.02.403 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Media in the Classroom Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.400 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Teacher Talk in ELT Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.307 KO New Research on English Literatures and Cultures Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.112 (Fri) Ü Written English: Writing about British Asian Cinema Friday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 16/04/21)

Description:
British Asian cinema has its roots in the Black politics of the 1960s and '70s when a new wave of politically active filmmakers began to use film to challenge racism and create greater awareness of issues facing their communities, such as poverty and social exclusion. British Asian films, in keeping with these roots, focus on the position of South-Asian communities in Britain, and on the complex experiences of second generation British Asians growing up with both cultures. Key issues are conforming to, or rejecting, aspects of both cultures, often centering on religion, “arranged marriage”, intergenerational conflict, gender expectations, sexuality and racism. This Written English course forms one half of the compulsory module ang311: Integrated Language Skills. The module is assessed via a portfolio and the assessment requirements are a take-home essay and an edited version of this essay. The grade will be added to the result from Spoken English. Homework assignments as required by the lecturer will count towards active participation. British Asian cinema has its roots in the Black politics of the 1960s and '70s when a new wave of politically active filmmakers began to use film to challenge racism and create greater awareness of issues facing their communities, such as poverty and social exclusion. British Asian films, in keeping with these roots, focus on the position of South-Asian communities in Britain, and on the complex experiences of second generation British Asians growing up with both cultures. Key issues are conforming to, or rejecting, aspects of both cultures, often centering on religion, “arranged marriage”, intergenerational conflict, gender expectations, sexuality and racism. This Written English course forms one half of the compulsory module ang311: Integrated Language Skills. The module is assessed via a portfolio and the assessment requirements are a take-home essay and an edited version of this essay. The grade will be added to the result from Spoken English. Homework assignments as required by the lecturer will count towards active participation.
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.951 S Bilingualism Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
Seminar 2 Cornelia Hamann
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.304 KO New Research in American Literary and Cultural Studies Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.004 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Kim Ahrens
  • Bachelor
3.02.020 V Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
Lecture 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.302 KO Language Use, Variation and Change: Fach Anglistik/ Englisch Wednesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.410 (Tue) Ü Academic Discourse: Practical Translation Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
“Practical translation” aims to heighten your awareness of the differences between German and English, and to enable you to circumnavigate common translation problems. We will begin by looking at common problems such as translating complex noun phrases, relative clauses, false friends, progressive / simple / perfective aspects as part of a topic-based unit on Government and Politics in the UK and USA. You will then be given the opportunity, in small groups, to select your own text to translate; fictional, political, scientific research, an abstract, a film review, marketing, tourism, which you will present in class for peer review. Practical translation thus focusses on fine-tuning your accuracy and use of idiomatic English as well as equipping you with the tools to edit and translate a variety of genres of text. The assessment is based on two in-class tests (one mid-semester and compulsory, and one optional for students needing 3 credit points at the end of the semester; both compulsory for students requiring 6 credit points), plus the group translation of the text you selected and an individual commentary. “Practical translation” aims to heighten your awareness of the differences between German and English, and to enable you to circumnavigate common translation problems. We will begin by looking at common problems such as translating complex noun phrases, relative clauses, false friends, progressive / simple / perfective aspects as part of a topic-based unit on Government and Politics in the UK and USA. You will then be given the opportunity, in small groups, to select your own text to translate; fictional, political, scientific research, an abstract, a film review, marketing, tourism, which you will present in class for peer review. Practical translation thus focusses on fine-tuning your accuracy and use of idiomatic English as well as equipping you with the tools to edit and translate a variety of genres of text. The assessment is based on two in-class tests (one mid-semester and compulsory, and one optional for students needing 3 credit points at the end of the semester; both compulsory for students requiring 6 credit points), plus the group translation of the text you selected and an individual commentary.
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.028 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Nils Rademacher
  • Bachelor
3.02.306 KO New Research in British and Anglophone Literary and Cultural Studies Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.029 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Nils Rademacher
  • Bachelor
3.02.048 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 16/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
3.02.192 Dimensions of Diversity Monday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
Starting out with a definition of diversity and the application of diversity education in different contexts, this class aims at exploring different manifestations of the term both at school and classroom level. Using the PISA results in 2001 as a starting point, national, European and multicultural values will be regarded against the backdrop of educational policies. A postcolonial perspective and the phenomenon of globalisation contribute to a more complex grasp the issues at hand. Looking at the situation in countries such as the UK or the US, home and school languages will be contrasted. A special focus on EAL (English as an additional language) and bilingual upbringing add to the topic of linguistic diversity. As a next step, language diversity in education will be examined as a broader term and then specified as “translanguaging across the bilingual continuum” (Ofelia García). Language policies as a political statement will be an important point of discussion and possibly contention. This will also include the idea (or ideology?) of the native speaker ideal, which will be deconstructed but also regarded as a powerful influence on TESOL discourse and teaching traditions. Finally, the concept of language-sensitive teaching and its impact on the TESOL classroom will be put under scrutiny. Participants are encouraged to contribute more examples of diversity to our discourse in class. Heteronormativity, e.g. as reflected in text books, could be a starting point for a critical discussion of the state of affairs in German schools. How can equality, diversity and inclusion actually be put into practice? What are practical tools for pluralistic approaches in TESOL classes? The idea of an inclusive classroom in Lower Saxony and its curricular manifestations will be amended by examples of other institutions, e.g. the British Council. In this context, different documents, concepts, resources and interviews with practitioners will be studied and critically reflected upon. One particular displacement story will serve as a starting point to ask how literary learning can contribute to a more diverse approach towards TESOL teaching. The course finishes by focusing on the question how differentiation can foster learning in the TESOL classroom. The concept of differentiation will be examined from a variety of angles and examples from teaching materials and textbooks serve as an opportunity to practise one`s analytical skills. Scaffolding is another important term participants need to be familiar with. Relevant references in the field will have to be studied in order to prepare for the final assessment. Assessment issues: Participants are expected to -contribute to discourse during class. -provide samples of their work. -pass an end-of-term test (written assessment / “E-Klausur”) Starting out with a definition of diversity and the application of diversity education in different contexts, this class aims at exploring different manifestations of the term both at school and classroom level. Using the PISA results in 2001 as a starting point, national, European and multicultural values will be regarded against the backdrop of educational policies. A postcolonial perspective and the phenomenon of globalisation contribute to a more complex grasp the issues at hand. Looking at the situation in countries such as the UK or the US, home and school languages will be contrasted. A special focus on EAL (English as an additional language) and bilingual upbringing add to the topic of linguistic diversity. As a next step, language diversity in education will be examined as a broader term and then specified as “translanguaging across the bilingual continuum” (Ofelia García). Language policies as a political statement will be an important point of discussion and possibly contention. This will also include the idea (or ideology?) of the native speaker ideal, which will be deconstructed but also regarded as a powerful influence on TESOL discourse and teaching traditions. Finally, the concept of language-sensitive teaching and its impact on the TESOL classroom will be put under scrutiny. Participants are encouraged to contribute more examples of diversity to our discourse in class. Heteronormativity, e.g. as reflected in text books, could be a starting point for a critical discussion of the state of affairs in German schools. How can equality, diversity and inclusion actually be put into practice? What are practical tools for pluralistic approaches in TESOL classes? The idea of an inclusive classroom in Lower Saxony and its curricular manifestations will be amended by examples of other institutions, e.g. the British Council. In this context, different documents, concepts, resources and interviews with practitioners will be studied and critically reflected upon. One particular displacement story will serve as a starting point to ask how literary learning can contribute to a more diverse approach towards TESOL teaching. The course finishes by focusing on the question how differentiation can foster learning in the TESOL classroom. The concept of differentiation will be examined from a variety of angles and examples from teaching materials and textbooks serve as an opportunity to practise one`s analytical skills. Scaffolding is another important term participants need to be familiar with. Relevant references in the field will have to be studied in order to prepare for the final assessment. Assessment issues: Participants are expected to -contribute to discourse during class. -provide samples of their work. -pass an end-of-term test (written assessment / “E-Klausur”)
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.308 KO Anglistisches-Amerikanistisches Forschungskolloquium Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Master
3.02.511 Ü Betreuung des Praxisblocks vor Ort (GHR) im Unterrichtsfach Englisch The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Exercises - Edeltraud Breiter
  • Master of Education
3.02.076 (Fri 8:00) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: British and Irish Politics, History and Culture Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 16/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
3.02.008 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Edda Hagemann
  • Bachelor
3.02.104 Ü Spoken English: Higher Education in North America (Tues) Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.484 S Teaching Literature in the EFL Classroom Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
Teaching literature in the EFL Classroom Amongst the current generation of teaching professionals, the question whether literature – both with a capital and a small `l´- should be used in the EFL classroom is usually answered with a resounding “yes!”. For years critics of the competence-based approach have been calling for literature to be re-established as a means of fostering an education that goes beyond a mere acquisition of a certain skill set. In our digital age the number of literary texts available online as well as the products emerging from the communication between readers, texts and authors open up new types of literary discourse and expression transcending age, nationality and educational background. On the other hand, future teachers of English are bound to come across restrictions regarding their choice of literary works as well as the topics connected to them. German Abitur exams in particular require close scrutiny of the curriculum. Set texts and a variety of linguistic and analytical skills will be required to meet the assessment standards stipulated by the Ministry of Education. From primary school through to the final years of secondary school and Abitur-level both extensive reading of literary texts as well as reading with a view of composing a piece of writing are expected to be fostered systematically. The seminar aims at providing an overview of different literary texts, approaches and methods viable in the EFL classroom. Starting with visualisation techniques, story telling, scenic interpretation and creative writing participants are expected to get actively involved in classes by creating their own literary products and exchanging ideas about the viability of different didactic approaches. Other than that, everyone will be required to provide short keynote presentations on a selection of topics connected to teaching literature. You can put your name down for topics from the second week of term. Against the backdrop of current research in Didactics, participants are expected to analyse teaching and learning materials as well as (excerpts from) current textbooks for various age groups. Different approaches towards teaching literature will be explored. The development of units of work and lesson plans will be informed by relevant theories of language learning and teaching and can be critically applied to a selection of tasks, resources and ideas for projects connected to teaching literature. Lesson planning and the analysis of lessons involves • realistic target setting, • allowing for differentiation, • an appropriate choice of materials and media • as well as devising appropriate assessment strategies. Schemes of work submitted by students will be put under close scrutiny by peers and the lecturer in order to determine their viability in the classroom. Ideally, concepts and strategies will be put into practice during subsequent internships. As regards the submission of coursework as part of your final assessment, all participants are required to hand in a portfolio showing their ability to plan and reflect on lessons and schemes of work or tasks. Teaching literature in the EFL Classroom Amongst the current generation of teaching professionals, the question whether literature – both with a capital and a small `l´- should be used in the EFL classroom is usually answered with a resounding “yes!”. For years critics of the competence-based approach have been calling for literature to be re-established as a means of fostering an education that goes beyond a mere acquisition of a certain skill set. In our digital age the number of literary texts available online as well as the products emerging from the communication between readers, texts and authors open up new types of literary discourse and expression transcending age, nationality and educational background. On the other hand, future teachers of English are bound to come across restrictions regarding their choice of literary works as well as the topics connected to them. German Abitur exams in particular require close scrutiny of the curriculum. Set texts and a variety of linguistic and analytical skills will be required to meet the assessment standards stipulated by the Ministry of Education. From primary school through to the final years of secondary school and Abitur-level both extensive reading of literary texts as well as reading with a view of composing a piece of writing are expected to be fostered systematically. The seminar aims at providing an overview of different literary texts, approaches and methods viable in the EFL classroom. Starting with visualisation techniques, story telling, scenic interpretation and creative writing participants are expected to get actively involved in classes by creating their own literary products and exchanging ideas about the viability of different didactic approaches. Other than that, everyone will be required to provide short keynote presentations on a selection of topics connected to teaching literature. You can put your name down for topics from the second week of term. Against the backdrop of current research in Didactics, participants are expected to analyse teaching and learning materials as well as (excerpts from) current textbooks for various age groups. Different approaches towards teaching literature will be explored. The development of units of work and lesson plans will be informed by relevant theories of language learning and teaching and can be critically applied to a selection of tasks, resources and ideas for projects connected to teaching literature. Lesson planning and the analysis of lessons involves • realistic target setting, • allowing for differentiation, • an appropriate choice of materials and media • as well as devising appropriate assessment strategies. Schemes of work submitted by students will be put under close scrutiny by peers and the lecturer in order to determine their viability in the classroom. Ideally, concepts and strategies will be put into practice during subsequent internships. As regards the submission of coursework as part of your final assessment, all participants are required to hand in a portfolio showing their ability to plan and reflect on lessons and schemes of work or tasks.
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.140 S Writing Sexual Identities: Lesbian and Gay Fiction in the Twentieth Century Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
The seminar covers a wide range of same-sex writing in twentieth-century Anglophone literature. Beginning with an exploration of Modernist literature, the course will first focus on the impact of late-Victorian sexologists on early 20th-century understandings of sexual identity. Other key moments to be addressed in class include comradeship in the First World War, the liberating social changes of the queer Sixties and the AIDS crisis of the 1980ies and 1990ies. Above and beyond this historical overview, the seminar will discuss some of the central aspects that have lastingly characterised representations of gay and lesbian as well as queer culture throughout the last century, among them drag and camp. PRIMARY TEXTS (MANDATORY READING) Forster, E.M. %%Maurice%%. 1971. London: Penguin, 2005. Print. Walter, George, ed. %%The Penguin Book of First World War Poetry%%. London: Penguin, 2006. Print. [selected poems by Wilfred Owen et al.] Hall, Radclyffe. %%The Well of Loneliness%%. 1928. London: Penguin, 2015. Print. Orton, Joe. %%What the Butler Saw%%. London et al.: Bloomsbury, 1969. Print. [or any other edition] Mars-Jones, Adam. %%Monopolies of Loss%%. London: Faber and Faber, 1992. Print. [selected short stories] Kay, Jackie %%Trumpet%%. 1998. London: Picador, 2016. Print. The seminar covers a wide range of same-sex writing in twentieth-century Anglophone literature. Beginning with an exploration of Modernist literature, the course will first focus on the impact of late-Victorian sexologists on early 20th-century understandings of sexual identity. Other key moments to be addressed in class include comradeship in the First World War, the liberating social changes of the queer Sixties and the AIDS crisis of the 1980ies and 1990ies. Above and beyond this historical overview, the seminar will discuss some of the central aspects that have lastingly characterised representations of gay and lesbian as well as queer culture throughout the last century, among them drag and camp. PRIMARY TEXTS (MANDATORY READING) Forster, E.M. %%Maurice%%. 1971. London: Penguin, 2005. Print. Walter, George, ed. %%The Penguin Book of First World War Poetry%%. London: Penguin, 2006. Print. [selected poems by Wilfred Owen et al.] Hall, Radclyffe. %%The Well of Loneliness%%. 1928. London: Penguin, 2015. Print. Orton, Joe. %%What the Butler Saw%%. London et al.: Bloomsbury, 1969. Print. [or any other edition] Mars-Jones, Adam. %%Monopolies of Loss%%. London: Faber and Faber, 1992. Print. [selected short stories] Kay, Jackie %%Trumpet%%. 1998. London: Picador, 2016. Print.
Seminar 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.075 (Thu 10:00) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: British and Irish Politics, History and Culture Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
3.02.046 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
3.02.480 S Current Issues in ELT Monday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Master of Education
3.02.002 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Wednesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Michelle Kerkhoff
  • Bachelor
3.02.102 (Wed) Ü Spoken English: Germany Through an Anglophone Lens Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
“Admiration, antagonism & ambivalence” was what characterized British images of Germany before WWI according to the historian Richard Scully. This course explores representations of Germany, its people and its language, and how these images have changed historically. We will explore contexts such as Tatort, German citizenship classes, the World Cup, the German language according to Mark Twain, and stereotypes of Germany in the Anglophone press. The assessment requirement for this Spoken English course is an oral language test at the end of the semester, with the grade to be added to the result from Written English. A podcast and group discussions will count towards active participation and will provide students with valuable language feedback. “Admiration, antagonism & ambivalence” was what characterized British images of Germany before WWI according to the historian Richard Scully. This course explores representations of Germany, its people and its language, and how these images have changed historically. We will explore contexts such as Tatort, German citizenship classes, the World Cup, the German language according to Mark Twain, and stereotypes of Germany in the Anglophone press. The assessment requirement for this Spoken English course is an oral language test at the end of the semester, with the grade to be added to the result from Written English. A podcast and group discussions will count towards active participation and will provide students with valuable language feedback.
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.950 Psycholinguistics and the Interfaces Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Marcel Schlechtweg
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.005 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Kim Ahrens
  • Bachelor
3.02.073 (Wed 12:00) Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: British and Irish Politics, History and Culture Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
3.02.009 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Monday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Jill-Dean Rose
  • Bachelor
3.02.120 S Nineteenth-Century African-American Novels Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
Despite the fact that the American institution of slavery prohibited the majority of African Americans from acquiring reading and writing skills, there nevertheless developed a remarkably rich body of Black literature throughout the 19th century. In this class, we study several fictional texts by Black authors in order to explore the relationship between the fast-changing socio-political contexts that shaped them and their modes of narration, as well as their imaginative and aesthetic expressions. We will begin with Frederick Douglass’s revision of his first slave narrative as a work that enhances this dominant Black genre of the first half of the 19th century, offering an entry into a period of a much more variegated literary production. Guiding questions for our seminar are: What are these novels’ major concerns regarding the social place and civil participation of Blacks in (postbellum) America? How does Black fiction represent the tension between socio-economic progress and the burdens of a “double consciousness”? In what ways – discursively and imaginatively – do authors articulate the concerns, visions, and struggles of Blacks at the time? Please note: This course will take place online. Please check for news and updates on Stud.IP and the syllabus once it is available. Active participation is mandatory, also in online class sessions. Please purchase and read the following primary texts: - Frederick Douglass, My Freedom and My Bondage. 1855. W.W. Norton, 2020. [preferably] https://www.wwnorton.co.uk/books/9780393923636-my-bondage-and-my-freedom. - Harriet E. Wilson. Our Nig: Sketches From the Life of a Free Black. 1859. Ed. by Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and Richard J. Ellis. New York: Vintage, 2011. - Charles W. Chesnutt. The Marrow of Tradition. 1901. W.W. Norton, 2012. [preferably if you manage to get a hold of it; if that is not possible, choose an edition that includes an introduction] https://www.wwnorton.co.uk/books/9780393934144-the-marrow-of-tradition. As the CvO-bookstore has closed, please make sure that you order these novels as soon as possible. Despite the fact that the American institution of slavery prohibited the majority of African Americans from acquiring reading and writing skills, there nevertheless developed a remarkably rich body of Black literature throughout the 19th century. In this class, we study several fictional texts by Black authors in order to explore the relationship between the fast-changing socio-political contexts that shaped them and their modes of narration, as well as their imaginative and aesthetic expressions. We will begin with Frederick Douglass’s revision of his first slave narrative as a work that enhances this dominant Black genre of the first half of the 19th century, offering an entry into a period of a much more variegated literary production. Guiding questions for our seminar are: What are these novels’ major concerns regarding the social place and civil participation of Blacks in (postbellum) America? How does Black fiction represent the tension between socio-economic progress and the burdens of a “double consciousness”? In what ways – discursively and imaginatively – do authors articulate the concerns, visions, and struggles of Blacks at the time? Please note: This course will take place online. Please check for news and updates on Stud.IP and the syllabus once it is available. Active participation is mandatory, also in online class sessions. Please purchase and read the following primary texts: - Frederick Douglass, My Freedom and My Bondage. 1855. W.W. Norton, 2020. [preferably] https://www.wwnorton.co.uk/books/9780393923636-my-bondage-and-my-freedom. - Harriet E. Wilson. Our Nig: Sketches From the Life of a Free Black. 1859. Ed. by Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and Richard J. Ellis. New York: Vintage, 2011. - Charles W. Chesnutt. The Marrow of Tradition. 1901. W.W. Norton, 2012. [preferably if you manage to get a hold of it; if that is not possible, choose an edition that includes an introduction] https://www.wwnorton.co.uk/books/9780393934144-the-marrow-of-tradition. As the CvO-bookstore has closed, please make sure that you order these novels as soon as possible.
Seminar 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.024 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.402 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Working with Grammar and Vocabulary Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.037 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Wednesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Patrick Therkorn
  • Bachelor
3.02.043 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Julius Greve
  • Bachelor
3.02.070 Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Lands Down Under Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.510 Ü Betreuung des Praxisblocks vor Ort (HR) im Unterrichtsfach Englisch Dates on Wednesday. 05.05.21 16:00 - 18:00, Wednesday. 19.05.21 12:00 - 14:00, Wednesday. 26.05.21 16:00 - 18:00, Wednesday. 02.06.21 ...(more)
Description:
This course aims at widening your planning and teaching skills as a reflective practitioner. In a school environment you are going to put your knowledge and previous teaching expertise to the test by checking its viability in a real-life classroom. Please invite me for teaching observations at the earliest opportunity. For a supervised lesson observation you will be required to submit a lesson plan and be prepared to discuss lesson outcomes afterwards. The aim is to make the most of your field experience. This course aims at widening your planning and teaching skills as a reflective practitioner. In a school environment you are going to put your knowledge and previous teaching expertise to the test by checking its viability in a real-life classroom. Please invite me for teaching observations at the earliest opportunity. For a supervised lesson observation you will be required to submit a lesson plan and be prepared to discuss lesson outcomes afterwards. The aim is to make the most of your field experience.
Exercises - Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.044 Ü Key Concepts in Cultural Studies Wednesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
3.02.305 KO New Research in American Literary and Cultural Studies Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
This course is open to all students who are preparing to write - or who are already in the process of writing - their BA and MA theses in American literary and cultural studies, as well as to students who want to do a research module ("Recherchemodul"). Students will hone their academic writings skills through various exercises and written assignments, develop an exposé, and share and revise their work in progress. The course also offers the opportunity to discuss theoretical texts central to the research projects of the participants. Requirements: Regular attendance to the scheduled online sessions; completion of all writing assignments; development of an exposé; active participation in class discussions. This course is open to all students who are preparing to write - or who are already in the process of writing - their BA and MA theses in American literary and cultural studies, as well as to students who want to do a research module ("Recherchemodul"). Students will hone their academic writings skills through various exercises and written assignments, develop an exposé, and share and revise their work in progress. The course also offers the opportunity to discuss theoretical texts central to the research projects of the participants. Requirements: Regular attendance to the scheduled online sessions; completion of all writing assignments; development of an exposé; active participation in class discussions.
Colloquium 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.150 S Postcolonial Science in Contemporary Fiction Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.077 Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: The United States (Mi., 14:00 - 16:00) Wednesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.02.040 V Historical Backgrounds and Critical Concepts Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Lecture 2 Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Bachelor
3.02.999 Anthropocene Stories: a Creative Writing Workshop that engages with Climate Change The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
miscellaneous - Dr. Jaspreet Singh
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.90.115 EMMIR Master Thesis "Navigating EMMIR" (MM41) Monday: 11:00 - 13:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)
Friday: 11:00 - 13:00, weekly (from 16/04/21)

Description:
Seminar - Dr. Lydia Potts
Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
Michal Musialowski
3.02.026 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Monday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Robert Sowa
  • Bachelor
3.02.152 S Physics in Contemporary Fiction Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/2021_Physics_in_Contemporary_Fiction http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/2021_Physics_in_Contemporary_Fiction
Seminar 2 Dr. Anna Auguscik
Priv.-Doz. Dr. Petra Groß, Ph.D.
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.110 Written English: Reimagining Education (Di., 14:00 - 16:00) Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.027 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Robert Sowa
  • Bachelor
3.02.079 Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: The United States (Do., 14:00 - 16:00) Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.02.001 V Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part 2 Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
Lecture 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.520 Ü Begleitung und Nachbereitung der Praxisphase GHR 300 im Unterrichtsfach Englisch Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 16/04/21)
Dates on Friday. 26.02.21, Friday. 05.03.21, Friday. 12.03.21, Friday. 26.03.21 08:00 - 10:00, Monday. 12.07.21 - Tuesday. 13.07.21 08:00 - 16:00

Description:
Exercises 1 Christian Kramer, M.A.
Elisabeth Lücken
Kerstin Weerts
  • Master of Education
3.02.483 S Teaching Literature in the EFL Classroom Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
Teaching literature in the EFL Classroom Amongst the current generation of teaching professionals, the question whether literature – both with a capital and a small `l´- should be used in the EFL classroom is usually answered with a resounding “yes!”. For years critics of the competence-based approach have been calling for literature to be re-established as a means of fostering an education that goes beyond a mere acquisition of a certain skill set. In our digital age the number of literary texts available online as well as the products emerging from the communication between readers, texts and authors open up new types of literary discourse and expression transcending age, nationality and educational background. On the other hand, future teachers of English are bound to come across restrictions regarding their choice of literary works as well as the topics connected to them. German Abitur exams in particular require close scrutiny of the curriculum. Set texts and a variety of linguistic and analytical skills will be required to meet the assessment standards stipulated by the Ministry of Education. From primary school through to the final years of secondary school and Abitur-level both extensive reading of literary texts as well as reading with a view of composing a piece of writing are expected to be fostered systematically. The seminar aims at providing an overview of different literary texts, approaches and methods viable in the EFL classroom. Starting with visualisation techniques, story telling, scenic interpretation and creative writing participants are expected to get actively involved in classes by creating their own literary products and exchanging ideas about the viability of different didactic approaches. Other than that, everyone will be required to provide short keynote presentations on a selection of topics connected to teaching literature. You can put your name down for topics from the second week of term. Against the backdrop of current research in Didactics, participants are expected to analyse teaching and learning materials as well as (excerpts from) current textbooks for various age groups. Different approaches towards teaching literature will be explored. The development of units of work and lesson plans will be informed by relevant theories of language learning and teaching and can be critically applied to a selection of tasks, resources and ideas for projects connected to teaching literature. Lesson planning and the analysis of lessons involves • realistic target setting, • allowing for differentiation, • an appropriate choice of materials and media • as well as devising appropriate assessment strategies. Schemes of work submitted by students will be put under close scrutiny by peers and the lecturer in order to determine their viability in the classroom. Ideally, concepts and strategies will be put into practice during subsequent internships. As regards the submission of coursework as part of your final assessment, all participants are required to hand in a portfolio showing their ability to plan and reflect on lessons and schemes of work or tasks. Teaching literature in the EFL Classroom Amongst the current generation of teaching professionals, the question whether literature – both with a capital and a small `l´- should be used in the EFL classroom is usually answered with a resounding “yes!”. For years critics of the competence-based approach have been calling for literature to be re-established as a means of fostering an education that goes beyond a mere acquisition of a certain skill set. In our digital age the number of literary texts available online as well as the products emerging from the communication between readers, texts and authors open up new types of literary discourse and expression transcending age, nationality and educational background. On the other hand, future teachers of English are bound to come across restrictions regarding their choice of literary works as well as the topics connected to them. German Abitur exams in particular require close scrutiny of the curriculum. Set texts and a variety of linguistic and analytical skills will be required to meet the assessment standards stipulated by the Ministry of Education. From primary school through to the final years of secondary school and Abitur-level both extensive reading of literary texts as well as reading with a view of composing a piece of writing are expected to be fostered systematically. The seminar aims at providing an overview of different literary texts, approaches and methods viable in the EFL classroom. Starting with visualisation techniques, story telling, scenic interpretation and creative writing participants are expected to get actively involved in classes by creating their own literary products and exchanging ideas about the viability of different didactic approaches. Other than that, everyone will be required to provide short keynote presentations on a selection of topics connected to teaching literature. You can put your name down for topics from the second week of term. Against the backdrop of current research in Didactics, participants are expected to analyse teaching and learning materials as well as (excerpts from) current textbooks for various age groups. Different approaches towards teaching literature will be explored. The development of units of work and lesson plans will be informed by relevant theories of language learning and teaching and can be critically applied to a selection of tasks, resources and ideas for projects connected to teaching literature. Lesson planning and the analysis of lessons involves • realistic target setting, • allowing for differentiation, • an appropriate choice of materials and media • as well as devising appropriate assessment strategies. Schemes of work submitted by students will be put under close scrutiny by peers and the lecturer in order to determine their viability in the classroom. Ideally, concepts and strategies will be put into practice during subsequent internships. As regards the submission of coursework as part of your final assessment, all participants are required to hand in a portfolio showing their ability to plan and reflect on lessons and schemes of work or tasks.
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.481 S Methodology in ELT Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Master of Education
3.02.023 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 2 Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck, she/ her
  • Bachelor
3.02.311 KO Doing Research in Didactics Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
PLEASE NOTE THAT IN THIS COURSE, THERE IS ONLY A LIMITED NUMBER OF PLACES FOR BA / MA CANDIDATES! HENCE, IT IS IMPERATIVE FOR PARTICIPANTS TO LIAISE WITH THE LECTURER PRIOR TO REGISTRATION! This course is designed for students preparing to write their final thesis (BA or MA) in the field of Didactics. Looking for suitable and, above all, viable topics, presenting first ideas and subsequently coming up with a plan on how to carry out your actual research will be at the centre of the preparatory process. Candidates will be required to submit and present different types of documents, e.g. literature overview, research proposal, abstract, etc. You will be working independently outside class, preparing findings to peers and supervisors on a regular basis. Standards of academic research and writing will be discussed in plenary sessions. Students are expected to use feedback constructively and thus gradually commit to a final version of their research project. PLEASE NOTE THAT IN THIS COURSE, THERE IS ONLY A LIMITED NUMBER OF PLACES FOR BA / MA CANDIDATES! HENCE, IT IS IMPERATIVE FOR PARTICIPANTS TO LIAISE WITH THE LECTURER PRIOR TO REGISTRATION! This course is designed for students preparing to write their final thesis (BA or MA) in the field of Didactics. Looking for suitable and, above all, viable topics, presenting first ideas and subsequently coming up with a plan on how to carry out your actual research will be at the centre of the preparatory process. Candidates will be required to submit and present different types of documents, e.g. literature overview, research proposal, abstract, etc. You will be working independently outside class, preparing findings to peers and supervisors on a regular basis. Standards of academic research and writing will be discussed in plenary sessions. Students are expected to use feedback constructively and thus gradually commit to a final version of their research project.
Colloquium 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.105 Ü Spoken English: Food, glorious food Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.981 S From Tale to Testaments: Margaret Atwood's Feminist Dystopias Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
In this course, we study Margaret Atwood’s "The Handmaid’s Tale" (1985) and its sequel, "The Testaments" (2019). Separated by more than three decades, these novels correspond in their strong focus on women’s situatedness in Western social and political systems. Drawing on the genre of utopian/dystopian fiction, the novels imagine and reflect on the successes and failures of socio-political systems and the ways in which they empower, regulate, and control women’s capabilities, expressions, and desires. Notably, Atwood’s female protagonists cannot easily be sorted into clear-cut categories of oppressed victims, resistant heroines, or wicked accomplices. Hence, alongside exploring questions about issues of politics, gender, and violence, we will also consider the various in-between spaces (“interstices”) that the novels’ protagonists occupy. To do so, we will take into consideration Atwood’s own theorizing about women’s survival and refusal to be victims. Please purchase and read (any edition of) "The Handmaid’s Tale" (1985) and "The Testaments" (2019). In this course, we study Margaret Atwood’s "The Handmaid’s Tale" (1985) and its sequel, "The Testaments" (2019). Separated by more than three decades, these novels correspond in their strong focus on women’s situatedness in Western social and political systems. Drawing on the genre of utopian/dystopian fiction, the novels imagine and reflect on the successes and failures of socio-political systems and the ways in which they empower, regulate, and control women’s capabilities, expressions, and desires. Notably, Atwood’s female protagonists cannot easily be sorted into clear-cut categories of oppressed victims, resistant heroines, or wicked accomplices. Hence, alongside exploring questions about issues of politics, gender, and violence, we will also consider the various in-between spaces (“interstices”) that the novels’ protagonists occupy. To do so, we will take into consideration Atwood’s own theorizing about women’s survival and refusal to be victims. Please purchase and read (any edition of) "The Handmaid’s Tale" (1985) and "The Testaments" (2019).
Seminar 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.971 S CAMP! Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 12/04/21)

Description:
Judy Garland singing %%Somewhere over the Rainbow%% in shiny red slippers, the look of Doris Day, a cheesy song by Liza Minnelli, the impersonations of Dame Edna, ABBA, the architecture of Gaudi, feather boas, the aphorisms of Oscar Wilde and Quentin Crisp, a Eurovision song performed with maximum verve, Julie Andrews yodelling on a mountaintop, psychedelic sci-fi flicks from the 1960s, the Austin Powers movies, a Tiffany lamp, glam rock, Batman and Robin, Bette Davis, Bette Midler, the arias of Florence Foster-Jenkins, rococo, Kiss, Ernie & Bert, water ballet revues, the Last Night of the Proms, %%Huit Femmes%%, %%The Rocky Horror Picture Show%%, %%Hairspray%% and perhaps flamingos … If these things make you laugh for no particular reason, this may well be the right class for you. According to the late Susan Sontag then, camp is "a certain mode of aestheticism. It is one way of seeing the world as an aesthetic phenomenon." Seeing the world through camp lenses has its advantages, for camp, the notorious 'gay sensibility', also signifies a powerful deconstructivist practice. As such, its favourite tasks are to ridicule failed seriousness, to unmask false glamour, and to expose the unmarked and invisible workings that underlie a (hetero-)normative culture. However, there is another side to camp, for camp also loves the things it mocks and ridicules, loves it, that is, when it can assemble and confer "beauty" on a world that has lost its charms. Hence, camp needs to be regarded as a fundamentally ambivalent sensibility: political in the sense that its paranoid/deconstructivist practices aim at demystification and exposure, and thera-peutic in the sense that its aesthetic/reparative practices strive for comfort, uplift, and healing. This seminar tries to explore the workings of camp, analysing its distribution, its subterfuge, and its parodic reinscriptions. PRIMARY TEXTS Crisp, Quentin. %%The Naked Civil Servant%%. New York and London: HarperCollins, 2007. Print. [or any other edition] %%Calamity Jane%%. Dir. David Butler. Perf. Doris Day and Howard Keel. 1953. Warner Home Video, 2003. DVD. Orton, Joe. %%What the Butler Saw%%. London et al.: Bloomsbury, 1969. Print. [or any other edition] %%The Rocky Horror Picture Show%%. Dir. Jim Sharman. Perf. Tim Curry, Susan Sarandon, and Barry Bostwick. 1975. Twentieth Century Fox, 2013. DVD. %%Velvet Goldmine%%. Dir. Todd Haynes. Dir. Jonathan Rhys Meyers, Ewan McGregor, Christian Bale, Toni Collette. 1998. Miramax, 2000. Judy Garland singing %%Somewhere over the Rainbow%% in shiny red slippers, the look of Doris Day, a cheesy song by Liza Minnelli, the impersonations of Dame Edna, ABBA, the architecture of Gaudi, feather boas, the aphorisms of Oscar Wilde and Quentin Crisp, a Eurovision song performed with maximum verve, Julie Andrews yodelling on a mountaintop, psychedelic sci-fi flicks from the 1960s, the Austin Powers movies, a Tiffany lamp, glam rock, Batman and Robin, Bette Davis, Bette Midler, the arias of Florence Foster-Jenkins, rococo, Kiss, Ernie & Bert, water ballet revues, the Last Night of the Proms, %%Huit Femmes%%, %%The Rocky Horror Picture Show%%, %%Hairspray%% and perhaps flamingos … If these things make you laugh for no particular reason, this may well be the right class for you. According to the late Susan Sontag then, camp is "a certain mode of aestheticism. It is one way of seeing the world as an aesthetic phenomenon." Seeing the world through camp lenses has its advantages, for camp, the notorious 'gay sensibility', also signifies a powerful deconstructivist practice. As such, its favourite tasks are to ridicule failed seriousness, to unmask false glamour, and to expose the unmarked and invisible workings that underlie a (hetero-)normative culture. However, there is another side to camp, for camp also loves the things it mocks and ridicules, loves it, that is, when it can assemble and confer "beauty" on a world that has lost its charms. Hence, camp needs to be regarded as a fundamentally ambivalent sensibility: political in the sense that its paranoid/deconstructivist practices aim at demystification and exposure, and thera-peutic in the sense that its aesthetic/reparative practices strive for comfort, uplift, and healing. This seminar tries to explore the workings of camp, analysing its distribution, its subterfuge, and its parodic reinscriptions. PRIMARY TEXTS Crisp, Quentin. %%The Naked Civil Servant%%. New York and London: HarperCollins, 2007. Print. [or any other edition] %%Calamity Jane%%. Dir. David Butler. Perf. Doris Day and Howard Keel. 1953. Warner Home Video, 2003. DVD. Orton, Joe. %%What the Butler Saw%%. London et al.: Bloomsbury, 1969. Print. [or any other edition] %%The Rocky Horror Picture Show%%. Dir. Jim Sharman. Perf. Tim Curry, Susan Sarandon, and Barry Bostwick. 1975. Twentieth Century Fox, 2013. DVD. %%Velvet Goldmine%%. Dir. Todd Haynes. Dir. Jonathan Rhys Meyers, Ewan McGregor, Christian Bale, Toni Collette. 1998. Miramax, 2000.
Seminar 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.113 Ü Written English: College Commencement Speeches (Tues) Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.401 Ü English for Educational Purposes: Designing Reading Materials (10-12) Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 15/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.482 S Teaching Advanced EFL Students Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
This class aims at providing an overview of what teaching advanced EFL classes (B1-B2+) actually involves in terms of lesson preparation and assessment strategies. Using standardised tests as a starting point to sharpen one`s diagnostic skills, we shall then turn to different types of tasks designed to foster language learning and thus help pupils to reach a higher level on the CEFR scale. Due to the sheer scope of the various skills that need to be fostered in an average EFL classroom, we shall focus our attention on different learning and teaching materials in order to critically assess whether they are actually fit for purpose. Consequently, designing adequate worksheets, tests and online resources will be the next step in an effort to improve teaching skills and to develop proper units of work (rather than "spur of the moment" teaching). Criteria of successful EFL teaching - both from Germany and the UK - will be applied to all the products designed in class in order to enhance lesson planning expertise. As EFL teachers in Germany are expected to deliver the national (KMK standards) and the regional curriculum (KC Niedersachsen), a rigorous study of the documents in question is required. Against the backdrop of the Pandemic, opportunities and limits of digital EFL teaching will be examined. Relevant reference needs to be studied in order to work on an expert view on the issue. By the end of term participants are expected to -sit two in-class assessments in the course of the term -compose a 1500 word essay based on relevant literature -take part in classroom discourse by providing comments and results from academic reading -be able to critically examine lesson plans against the backdrop of the competence-based approach All these skills shall be demonstrated and displayed in a portfolio which will be awarded a final grade. The two in-class (online) tests and the essay comprise said portfolio so that participants will receive their grade by the end of term. This class aims at providing an overview of what teaching advanced EFL classes (B1-B2+) actually involves in terms of lesson preparation and assessment strategies. Using standardised tests as a starting point to sharpen one`s diagnostic skills, we shall then turn to different types of tasks designed to foster language learning and thus help pupils to reach a higher level on the CEFR scale. Due to the sheer scope of the various skills that need to be fostered in an average EFL classroom, we shall focus our attention on different learning and teaching materials in order to critically assess whether they are actually fit for purpose. Consequently, designing adequate worksheets, tests and online resources will be the next step in an effort to improve teaching skills and to develop proper units of work (rather than "spur of the moment" teaching). Criteria of successful EFL teaching - both from Germany and the UK - will be applied to all the products designed in class in order to enhance lesson planning expertise. As EFL teachers in Germany are expected to deliver the national (KMK standards) and the regional curriculum (KC Niedersachsen), a rigorous study of the documents in question is required. Against the backdrop of the Pandemic, opportunities and limits of digital EFL teaching will be examined. Relevant reference needs to be studied in order to work on an expert view on the issue. By the end of term participants are expected to -sit two in-class assessments in the course of the term -compose a 1500 word essay based on relevant literature -take part in classroom discourse by providing comments and results from academic reading -be able to critically examine lesson plans against the backdrop of the competence-based approach All these skills shall be demonstrated and displayed in a portfolio which will be awarded a final grade. The two in-class (online) tests and the essay comprise said portfolio so that participants will receive their grade by the end of term.
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.072 Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Lands Down Under Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 13/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.980 S Dead Precedents: Cyberpunk, Hip Hop, and Other Futurisms Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
In Dead Precedents: How Hip-Hop Defines the Future (2018), Roy Christopher claims that hip hop culture is “inherently futuristic” – on the level of both form and content. This seminar traces and critically examines the textual, visual, and musical cultures Christopher assembles, thereby putting his claim to the test. Asking “What are hip hop futures?” rather than “What is the future of hip hop?” participants will make themselves familiar with the future scenarios and imaginary socialities Christopher discovers in cyberpunk fiction, Afrofuturism, hip hop aesthetics, spoken word and MC lyricism, and related forms of cultural expression. From Filippo T. Marinetti to Sun Ra, from William Gibson to N. K. Jemisin, from Blade Runner to The Matrix, from Afrika Bambaataa to Cannibal Ox, from Jean-Michel Basquiat to Style Wars, from Alice Coltrane to Erykah Badu, and from the Wu-Tang Clan to Run the Jewels – this seminar explores the historically based parallel drawn by Dead Precedents between cyberculture and hip hop culture (or, in other words, between hacking and sampling). Participants will have to read and analyze a heterogeneous selection of high-level theoretical texts on blackness, intertextuality, media ecology, and related fields, in order to come terms with the ways in which the primary materials negotiate the cultural and political dynamics of gender, race, ethnicity, and class. Each participant will have to be prepared to give a presentation on a specific topic related to a given “futurism.” Aside from additional short fiction, poems, lyrics, and theoretical texts, which will be made available via StudIP, the following two books need to be purchased by the seminar’s participants: - Roy Christopher, Dead Precedents: How Hip-Hop Defines the Future - William Gibson, Neuromancer In Dead Precedents: How Hip-Hop Defines the Future (2018), Roy Christopher claims that hip hop culture is “inherently futuristic” – on the level of both form and content. This seminar traces and critically examines the textual, visual, and musical cultures Christopher assembles, thereby putting his claim to the test. Asking “What are hip hop futures?” rather than “What is the future of hip hop?” participants will make themselves familiar with the future scenarios and imaginary socialities Christopher discovers in cyberpunk fiction, Afrofuturism, hip hop aesthetics, spoken word and MC lyricism, and related forms of cultural expression. From Filippo T. Marinetti to Sun Ra, from William Gibson to N. K. Jemisin, from Blade Runner to The Matrix, from Afrika Bambaataa to Cannibal Ox, from Jean-Michel Basquiat to Style Wars, from Alice Coltrane to Erykah Badu, and from the Wu-Tang Clan to Run the Jewels – this seminar explores the historically based parallel drawn by Dead Precedents between cyberculture and hip hop culture (or, in other words, between hacking and sampling). Participants will have to read and analyze a heterogeneous selection of high-level theoretical texts on blackness, intertextuality, media ecology, and related fields, in order to come terms with the ways in which the primary materials negotiate the cultural and political dynamics of gender, race, ethnicity, and class. Each participant will have to be prepared to give a presentation on a specific topic related to a given “futurism.” Aside from additional short fiction, poems, lyrics, and theoretical texts, which will be made available via StudIP, the following two books need to be purchased by the seminar’s participants: - Roy Christopher, Dead Precedents: How Hip-Hop Defines the Future - William Gibson, Neuromancer
Seminar 2 Dr. Julius Greve
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.160 Language Acquisition Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Marcel Schlechtweg
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.078 Ü Academic Speaking and Writing Skills: Discovering Canadian Culture Wednesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 14/04/21)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
112 Seminars

Top