Stud.IP Uni Oldenburg
University of Oldenburg
13.08.2020 02:45:37
Veranstaltungsverzeichnis

Institute of English and American Studies Click here for PDF-Download

Winter semester 2020/2021 132 Seminars
VAK Course Number Title Type Lecture
Preliminary studies
Advanced courses
Practical course
Colloquium
Research group
Workgroup
Project group
Council conference
Internship
Language course
Subject didactics
Excursion
Tutorial
Committee
SWS Semester weekly hours Teachers Degree
3.02.307 KO New Research on English Literatures and Cultures Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.310 DS Directed Studies The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Miscellaneous - Dr. phil. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.047 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses
Exercises 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
3.02.114 Ü Written English Wednesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.044 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses
Exercises 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
3.90.410 EMMIR Master Thesis "MA thesis proposal colloquium " (MM41) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
Michal Musialowski
Dr. Lydia Potts
3.02.111 Ü Written English Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.930 S World Englishes Thursday: 14:00 - 17:00, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Seminar 3 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.400 Ü English for Educational Purposes Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.160 S Titel folgt The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.101 Ü Spoken English Friday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 23/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.021 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Tuesday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
3.02.026 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Tuesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.405 Ü English for Educational Purposes Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.601 Ü Begleitveranstaltung für TutorInnen der Anglistik/ Amerikanistik: Linguistik/ Sprachwissenschaft The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Exercises - Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.029 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Friday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 23/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lina Abed Ibrahim, M.A.
  • Bachelor
3.90.310 EMMIR Focus Module "Migration and Small Nations: Situating Migration in Population Dynamics" (MM32.1/Semester 3) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - Gast Dozent
  • Master
3.02.046 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 23/10/20)

Description:
Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses
Exercises 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
3.02.306 KO New Research in British and Anglophone Literary and Cultural Studies Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.991 S Cult Media: The Production, Distribution, and Reception of Alternative Media The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - Dr. Michael Fuchs
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.302 KO Language Use, Variation and Change: Fach Anglistik/ Englisch Wednesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.115 Ü Written English Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.998 S Multiple Imaginations: Germany's Pasts and Presents The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
In this seminar, we will work on different narratives about and representations of what is imagined – in different times and under different (political, social, economic) circumstances – as ‘Germany’. We will explore what ‘Germany’ supposedly is and gain a deeper understanding of it. With a cultural studies perspective we will look at what and who is represented by whom as ‘German(y)’, who and what is excluded by the narratives, what the specific circumstances for specific narratives are, and which counter-narratives can be found. The aim of the seminar is not to study what is called ‘Germany’ or ‘Europe’ but to learn about representation and perspectives of (multiple) self-imaginations, how they are constructed in different narratives and which functions these imaginations serve. In the context of this seminar, we do a joint study trip to the Auswandererhaus in Bremerhaven to explore different narratives and representations about Germany’s past and present. With a selection of texts and short films we will examine issues of exclusion and inclusion, and their implications. In this seminar, we will work on different narratives about and representations of what is imagined – in different times and under different (political, social, economic) circumstances – as ‘Germany’. We will explore what ‘Germany’ supposedly is and gain a deeper understanding of it. With a cultural studies perspective we will look at what and who is represented by whom as ‘German(y)’, who and what is excluded by the narratives, what the specific circumstances for specific narratives are, and which counter-narratives can be found. The aim of the seminar is not to study what is called ‘Germany’ or ‘Europe’ but to learn about representation and perspectives of (multiple) self-imaginations, how they are constructed in different narratives and which functions these imaginations serve. In the context of this seminar, we do a joint study trip to the Auswandererhaus in Bremerhaven to explore different narratives and representations about Germany’s past and present. With a selection of texts and short films we will examine issues of exclusion and inclusion, and their implications.
Seminar - Lea Brenningmeyer
Sunday Omwenyeke
3.02.482 S Teaching Literature in the EFL Classroom Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.008 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Thursday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.312 DS Directed Studies The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Miscellaneous - Dr. Julius Greve
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.061 TUT Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Wednesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.200 S Media Literacy in ELT The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - Dr. Birte Sause
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.410 Ü Academic Discourse Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.190 S Intercultural Communicative Competence Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.170 S English as a Global Language Wednesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.003 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Monday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 19/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.100 Ü Spoken English Wednesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.022 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Wednesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
3.02.502 Ü Vorbereitung auf das Fachpraktikum Englisch (Gym) Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Making the most of your field experience. Having successfully mastered your initial pedagogical internship (“Allgemeines Schulpraktikum”), the next step is a subject-specific programme for future teachers of English. You will focus on the necessities of the syllabus but also on recognised standards, e.g. the Common European Framework and educational standards established across Germany (“Bildungsstandards”). The course is designed to help you make the transition from your university-based view on teaching to actually mastering the complex role of a classroom practitioner. Since your internship is likely to take place in Lower Saxony, the most recent version of the Core Curriculum (2016) will be explored and applied to the planning process of units of work and individual lessons. Participants are expected to critically analyse and develop complex tasks but also come up with short exercises and practice sessions as a means to foster language learning. Different teaching resources and textbooks will be studied against the backdrop of scientific insights into the subject. Lesson planning and creating units of work will be an integral part of the preparation for the upcoming field experience. A critical reflection of English lessons observed and taught during the initial pedagogical internship will serve as a basis for reflective lesson planning. A hands-on approach to developing key professional skills therefore involves • preparing and planning lessons and units of work, • realistic target setting • administrative skills such as reporting and recording, • assessment / testing and • planning for differentiation. By the end of the course you should be familiar with key requirements of lesson planning and teaching as well as the underlying principles of language learning. Making the most of your field experience. Having successfully mastered your initial pedagogical internship (“Allgemeines Schulpraktikum”), the next step is a subject-specific programme for future teachers of English. You will focus on the necessities of the syllabus but also on recognised standards, e.g. the Common European Framework and educational standards established across Germany (“Bildungsstandards”). The course is designed to help you make the transition from your university-based view on teaching to actually mastering the complex role of a classroom practitioner. Since your internship is likely to take place in Lower Saxony, the most recent version of the Core Curriculum (2016) will be explored and applied to the planning process of units of work and individual lessons. Participants are expected to critically analyse and develop complex tasks but also come up with short exercises and practice sessions as a means to foster language learning. Different teaching resources and textbooks will be studied against the backdrop of scientific insights into the subject. Lesson planning and creating units of work will be an integral part of the preparation for the upcoming field experience. A critical reflection of English lessons observed and taught during the initial pedagogical internship will serve as a basis for reflective lesson planning. A hands-on approach to developing key professional skills therefore involves • preparing and planning lessons and units of work, • realistic target setting • administrative skills such as reporting and recording, • assessment / testing and • planning for differentiation. By the end of the course you should be familiar with key requirements of lesson planning and teaching as well as the underlying principles of language learning.
Exercises 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.480 S Current Issues in ELT Monday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 19/10/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Master of Education
3.02.220 S Screening Europe: Representations of Europe in US-American Film and TV The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
“I may not know much but I do know that Europeans love Americans.” This is what Peter Parker’s sidekick Ned tells him as they set off on their school trip to Europe in the new "Spider-Man: Far from Home" movie (2019). This is just one example of a common trope in US-American film: the trip to Europe. Some US-American TV series also dedicate special “vacation episodes” to certain cities in Europe (e.g. "Friends," "Parks and Recreation," or "How I Met Your Mother"). In each of these cases, a certain notion of Europe, European cities, and Europeans is constructed. These notions often times include stereotypes, myths, and romantic ideas, e.g., sexual freedom, cheap alcohol, and old castles. No matter how different the films and TV series are, each of these representations reproduces but also constructs an idea of Europe, certain parts of Europe, and the people who live there. In the seminar, we will have a look at different representations of Europe in film and TV. With a representation-critical approach and the methodological toolkit of film analysis, global perspectives of Europe or parts of Europe and what it means to be European will be examined and analyzed. Guiding questions will be inter alia: - How is Europe represented? - Which filmic devices are employed to construct or support a certain notion of Europe? - What is represented/suggested/identified as (stereo)typical European? - Which voices are heard, which are not? What is made visible and what remains invisible? The course is primarily geared towards international exchange students participating in the "European Studies in Global Perspectives" program, but it is also open to University of Oldenburg students. “I may not know much but I do know that Europeans love Americans.” This is what Peter Parker’s sidekick Ned tells him as they set off on their school trip to Europe in the new "Spider-Man: Far from Home" movie (2019). This is just one example of a common trope in US-American film: the trip to Europe. Some US-American TV series also dedicate special “vacation episodes” to certain cities in Europe (e.g. "Friends," "Parks and Recreation," or "How I Met Your Mother"). In each of these cases, a certain notion of Europe, European cities, and Europeans is constructed. These notions often times include stereotypes, myths, and romantic ideas, e.g., sexual freedom, cheap alcohol, and old castles. No matter how different the films and TV series are, each of these representations reproduces but also constructs an idea of Europe, certain parts of Europe, and the people who live there. In the seminar, we will have a look at different representations of Europe in film and TV. With a representation-critical approach and the methodological toolkit of film analysis, global perspectives of Europe or parts of Europe and what it means to be European will be examined and analyzed. Guiding questions will be inter alia: - How is Europe represented? - Which filmic devices are employed to construct or support a certain notion of Europe? - What is represented/suggested/identified as (stereo)typical European? - Which voices are heard, which are not? What is made visible and what remains invisible? The course is primarily geared towards international exchange students participating in the "European Studies in Global Perspectives" program, but it is also open to University of Oldenburg students.
Seminar - Lea Brenningmeyer
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.510 Ü Betreuung des Fachpraktikums Englisch vor Ort (Gym) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
This course aims at widening your planning and teaching skills as a reflective practitioner. In a school environment you are going to put your knowledge and previous teaching expertise to the test by checking its viability in a real-life classroom. Please invite me for teaching observations at the earliest opportunity. For a supervised lesson observation you will be required to submit a lesson plan and be prepared to discuss lesson outcomes afterwards. The aim is to make the most of your field experience. This course aims at widening your planning and teaching skills as a reflective practitioner. In a school environment you are going to put your knowledge and previous teaching expertise to the test by checking its viability in a real-life classroom. Please invite me for teaching observations at the earliest opportunity. For a supervised lesson observation you will be required to submit a lesson plan and be prepared to discuss lesson outcomes afterwards. The aim is to make the most of your field experience.
Exercises - Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.071 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Wednesday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.079 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Friday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 23/10/20)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
3.02.056 TUT Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Monday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 19/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.110 Ü Written English Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.305 KO New Research in American Literary and Cultural Studies Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
This course is open to all students who are preparing to write - or are already in the process of writing - their BA and MA theses in American literary and cultural studies, or who want to do a research module (Recherchemodul). Students will hone their academic writings skills through various writing exercises, present or develop an exposé in the course of the term, and share and review their work in progress. The course offers opportunities to discuss theoretical or other scholarly texts central to the research projects of the individual participants. Requirements: regular attendance; development and presentation of an exposé; completion of writing assignments; active participation in class discussions. This course is open to all students who are preparing to write - or are already in the process of writing - their BA and MA theses in American literary and cultural studies, or who want to do a research module (Recherchemodul). Students will hone their academic writings skills through various writing exercises, present or develop an exposé in the course of the term, and share and review their work in progress. The course offers opportunities to discuss theoretical or other scholarly texts central to the research projects of the individual participants. Requirements: regular attendance; development and presentation of an exposé; completion of writing assignments; active participation in class discussions.
Colloquium 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.404 Ü English for Educational Purposes Wednesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.028 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Friday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 23/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lina Abed Ibrahim, M.A.
  • Bachelor
3.02.025 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Thursday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
3.02.037 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Thursday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.221 S Britain and Europe Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Richard Stinshoff
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.120 S American Poetry Since 1945: Politics, Culture, Signification Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Julius Greve
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.076 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Tuesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
3.02.950 S The Sounds of Language Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Marcel Schlechtweg
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.060 TUT Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Tuesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.080 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Thursday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.02.401 Ü English for Educational Purposes Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.504 Ü Vorbereitung auf das Forschungs- und Entwicklungspraktikum Fach Englisch (FEP) Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Dieser Kurs richtet sich an Masterstudierende, die auf Lehramt (Gym) Englisch studieren und im Fach Englisch das Forschungs- und Entwicklungspraktikum (FEP) im Frühjahr 2019 erbringen möchten. In der Vorbereitung stehen die eigenständige Entwicklung und Gestaltung eines eigenen Forschungsprojektes auf Grundlage von Unterrichtsbeobachtungen im Zentrum. Es gibt eine Einweisung in verschiedene Formen der Unterrichtsbeobachtung und einige praktische Übungen. Im Anschluss daran erfolgt die Erstellung von projektspezifischen Instrumenten zur Unterrichtsbeobachtung in thematisch unterteilten Expertengruppen. In der Nachbereitung stehen die Präsentation der Projektergebnisse sowie eine didaktische Reflexion des Projektes im Vordergrund. Dieser Kurs richtet sich an Masterstudierende, die auf Lehramt (Gym) Englisch studieren und im Fach Englisch das Forschungs- und Entwicklungspraktikum (FEP) im Frühjahr 2019 erbringen möchten. In der Vorbereitung stehen die eigenständige Entwicklung und Gestaltung eines eigenen Forschungsprojektes auf Grundlage von Unterrichtsbeobachtungen im Zentrum. Es gibt eine Einweisung in verschiedene Formen der Unterrichtsbeobachtung und einige praktische Übungen. Im Anschluss daran erfolgt die Erstellung von projektspezifischen Instrumenten zur Unterrichtsbeobachtung in thematisch unterteilten Expertengruppen. In der Nachbereitung stehen die Präsentation der Projektergebnisse sowie eine didaktische Reflexion des Projektes im Vordergrund.
Exercises 2 Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Master of Education
3.02.304 KO New Research in American Literary and Cultural Studies Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.078 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Thursday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
3.02.041 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 23/10/20)

Description:
Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses
Exercises 2 Alena Cicholewski
  • Bachelor
3.02.038 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Wednesday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.039 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Thursday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.192 S Dimensions of Diversity Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.024 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Thursday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
3.02.103 Ü Spoken English Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 19/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.062 TUT Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.070 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Tuesday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.020 V Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Lecture 2 Prof. Dr. Marcel Schlechtweg
  • Bachelor
3.02.970 S Anthropology in Contemporary Anglophone Fiction Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.500 Ü Vorbereitung der Praxisphase GHR 300 im Unterrichtsfach Englisch Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 23/10/20)

Description:
Exercises - Christian Kramer, M.A.
Elisabeth Lücken
Kerstin Weerts
  • Master of Education
3.02.072 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Thursday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.90.115 EMMIR Master Thesis "Navigating EMMIR" (MM41) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
Dr. Lydia Potts
Michal Musialowski
3.02.055 Repetitorium: Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 23/10/20)

Description:
Miscellaneous 2 Dr. phil. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.02.403 Ü English for Educational Purposes Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 19/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.90.340 EMMIR Focus Module "Gender and Feminism: Concepts and Theories" (MM32.3/Semester 3) Dates on Tuesday. 04.08.20 - Thursday. 06.08.20, Saturday. 08.08.20, Monday. 10.08.20 - Thursday. 13.08.20, Saturday. 15.08.20, Monday. ...(more)
Description:
Seminar - Gast Dozent
Dr.phil. Sylvia Pritsch
Dr. Lydia Potts
Prof. Dr. Sheila Marianne Meintjes
Prof. Dr. Fatima Sadiqi
Dr. Mai Izeldeen
Balghis Badri
  • Master
3.02.210 Informationen zum Kombinationsmodul The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Miscellaneous - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.074 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Thursday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.02.150 S "Uncle Toms" No More: African-American Writers in Dialogue with Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Ever since its first serial publication in 1851, Harriet Beecher Stowe’s "Uncle Tom’s Cabin" has been subject to controversial discussions. While the novel was highly popular among black and white abolitionists in the 19th century, issues of feminism, critical race theory, and religion have remained at odds and continue to occupy scholars, writers, and intellectuals - black and white, male and female. Important literary critical responses during the 19th and the 20th centuries have come from African American authors, who have addressed and re-worked Stowe’s novel from diverse vantage points and in different genres. This class focuses on selected literary responses by African American writers and intellectuals with a particular focus on the multidimensional and polysemic dialogues, which their revisions have opened up. Starting out from Stowe’s novel itself, we will study the 19th-century responses by Frederick Douglass and Frances Ellen Watkins Harper and the 20th-century postmodern re-workings by Ishmael Reed and Toni Morrison. Please purchase and read the Norton critical edition from 2018, edited by Elizabeth Ammons of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s "Uncle Tom’s Cabin" (1852). Also purchase and read Ismael Reed, "Flight to Canada" (1976) and Toni Morrison, "Beloved" (1987). Frederick Douglass’s novella “The Heroic Slave” (1853) and Frances Ellen Watkins Harper’s poem “Eliza Harris” (1853) can be accessed online at https://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/douglass1853/douglass1853.htmlhttps://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/douglass1853/douglass1853.html and https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/52447/eliza-harris respectively. Additional reading materials will be made available on Stud.IP at the beginning of the semester. Ever since its first serial publication in 1851, Harriet Beecher Stowe’s "Uncle Tom’s Cabin" has been subject to controversial discussions. While the novel was highly popular among black and white abolitionists in the 19th century, issues of feminism, critical race theory, and religion have remained at odds and continue to occupy scholars, writers, and intellectuals - black and white, male and female. Important literary critical responses during the 19th and the 20th centuries have come from African American authors, who have addressed and re-worked Stowe’s novel from diverse vantage points and in different genres. This class focuses on selected literary responses by African American writers and intellectuals with a particular focus on the multidimensional and polysemic dialogues, which their revisions have opened up. Starting out from Stowe’s novel itself, we will study the 19th-century responses by Frederick Douglass and Frances Ellen Watkins Harper and the 20th-century postmodern re-workings by Ishmael Reed and Toni Morrison. Please purchase and read the Norton critical edition from 2018, edited by Elizabeth Ammons of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s "Uncle Tom’s Cabin" (1852). Also purchase and read Ismael Reed, "Flight to Canada" (1976) and Toni Morrison, "Beloved" (1987). Frederick Douglass’s novella “The Heroic Slave” (1853) and Frances Ellen Watkins Harper’s poem “Eliza Harris” (1853) can be accessed online at https://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/douglass1853/douglass1853.htmlhttps://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/douglass1853/douglass1853.html and https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/52447/eliza-harris respectively. Additional reading materials will be made available on Stud.IP at the beginning of the semester.
Seminar 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.023 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Wednesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
3.02.002 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Monday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 19/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.009 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Thursday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.90.360 EMMIR Focus Module "Identity, Movement & Control" (MM32.6/Semester 3) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - Gast Dozent
  • Master
3.02.481 S Methodology in ELT Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Master of Education
3.02.997 Ü English Language Help Centre Monday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 19/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
3.02.180 S Titel folgt The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.301 KO Abschlusskolloquium: BA, MEd, DoktorandInnen, Projektband (Vor-/Nachbereitung) Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gehring
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.043 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Wednesday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses
Exercises 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
3.90.411 EMMIR Master Thesis "Research colloquium " (MM41) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
Michal Musialowski
Dr. Lydia Potts
3.02.063 TUT Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Monday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 19/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.600 Ü Begleitveranstaltung für Tutor_innen der Anglistik/ Amerikanistik: Literatur/Kultur Friday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 23/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
  • Master
3.02.027 Ü Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Friday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 23/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lina Abed Ibrahim, M.A.
  • Bachelor
3.02.035 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Monday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 19/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.036 TUT Introduction to Linguistics and the English Language Part 1 Tuesday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.006 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Wednesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.308 KO Anglistisches-Amerikanistisches Forschungskolloquium Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Prof. Dr. Martin Butler
Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Master
3.02.309 KO Language Use, Variation and Change: Fach Anglistik/ Englisch Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 19/10/20)

Description:
Colloquium 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.102 Ü Spoken English Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.075 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Wednesday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Inga Zalyevska
  • Bachelor
3.02.311 KO Doing Research in Didactics Monday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 19/10/20)

Description:
This course is designed for students preparing to write their final thesis (BA or MA) in the field of Didactics. Looking for suitable and, above all, viable topics, presenting first ideas and subsequently coming up with a plan on how to carry out your actual research will be at the centre of the preparatory process. Candidates will be required to submit and present different types of documents, e.g. literature overview, research proposal, abstract, etc. You will be working independently outside class, preparing findings to peers and supervisors on a regular basis. Standards of academic research and writing will be discussed in plenary sessions. Students are expected to use feedback constructively and thus gradually commit to a final version of their research project. This course is designed for students preparing to write their final thesis (BA or MA) in the field of Didactics. Looking for suitable and, above all, viable topics, presenting first ideas and subsequently coming up with a plan on how to carry out your actual research will be at the centre of the preparatory process. Candidates will be required to submit and present different types of documents, e.g. literature overview, research proposal, abstract, etc. You will be working independently outside class, preparing findings to peers and supervisors on a regular basis. Standards of academic research and writing will be discussed in plenary sessions. Students are expected to use feedback constructively and thus gradually commit to a final version of their research project.
Colloquium 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.059 TUT Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.191 S The Multilingual Classroom Monday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 19/10/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.005 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Tuesday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.980 S Polarizing Fiction: Science in Popular Literature Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. phil. Anna Auguscik
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.90.320 EMMIR Focus Module "Methods and Theories in Migration Studies: Knowledge Production & Research Methodology" (MM32.5/Semester 3) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - Dr. Lydia Potts
Michal Musialowski
Justine Grace Abrugena
  • Master
3.02.104 Ü Spoken English Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.121 S The Metaphysical Poets Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Galena Hashhozheva
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.511 Ü Betreuung des Fachpraktikums Englisch vor Ort (Gym) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
This course aims at widening your planning and teaching skills as a reflective practitioner. In a school environment you are going to put your knowledge and previous teaching expertise to the test by checking its viability in a real-life classroom. Please invite me for teaching observations at the earliest opportunity. For a supervised lesson observation you will be required to submit a lesson plan and be prepared to discuss lesson outcomes afterwards. The aim is to make the most of your field experience. This course aims at widening your planning and teaching skills as a reflective practitioner. In a school environment you are going to put your knowledge and previous teaching expertise to the test by checking its viability in a real-life classroom. Please invite me for teaching observations at the earliest opportunity. For a supervised lesson observation you will be required to submit a lesson plan and be prepared to discuss lesson outcomes afterwards. The aim is to make the most of your field experience.
Exercises - Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.112 Ü Written English Monday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 19/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.113 Ü Written English Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Johanna Hasanen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.045 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses
Exercises 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Bachelor
3.02.171 S Pragmatics The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - Robert Sowa
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.010 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Tuesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.503 Ü Vorbereitung auf das Fachpraktikum Englisch (Gym) Tuesday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Making the most of your field experience. Having successfully mastered your initial pedagogical internship (“Allgemeines Schulpraktikum”), the next step is a subject-specific programme for future teachers of English. You will focus on the necessities of the syllabus but also on recognised standards, e.g. the Common European Framework and educational standards established across Germany (“Bildungsstandards”). The course is designed to help you make the transition from your university-based view on teaching to actually mastering the complex role of a classroom practitioner. Since your internship is likely to take place in Lower Saxony, the most recent version of the Core Curriculum (2016) will be explored and applied to the planning process of units of work and individual lessons. Participants are expected to critically analyse and develop complex tasks but also come up with short exercises and practice sessions as a means to foster language learning. Different teaching resources and textbooks will be studied against the backdrop of scientific insights into the subject. Lesson planning and creating units of work will be an integral part of the preparation for the upcoming field experience. A critical reflection of English lessons observed and taught during the initial pedagogical internship will serve as a basis for reflective lesson planning. A hands-on approach to developing key professional skills therefore involves • preparing and planning lessons and units of work, • realistic target setting • administrative skills such as reporting and recording, • assessment / testing and • planning for differentiation. By the end of the course you should be familiar with key requirements of lesson planning and teaching as well as the underlying principles of language learning. Making the most of your field experience. Having successfully mastered your initial pedagogical internship (“Allgemeines Schulpraktikum”), the next step is a subject-specific programme for future teachers of English. You will focus on the necessities of the syllabus but also on recognised standards, e.g. the Common European Framework and educational standards established across Germany (“Bildungsstandards”). The course is designed to help you make the transition from your university-based view on teaching to actually mastering the complex role of a classroom practitioner. Since your internship is likely to take place in Lower Saxony, the most recent version of the Core Curriculum (2016) will be explored and applied to the planning process of units of work and individual lessons. Participants are expected to critically analyse and develop complex tasks but also come up with short exercises and practice sessions as a means to foster language learning. Different teaching resources and textbooks will be studied against the backdrop of scientific insights into the subject. Lesson planning and creating units of work will be an integral part of the preparation for the upcoming field experience. A critical reflection of English lessons observed and taught during the initial pedagogical internship will serve as a basis for reflective lesson planning. A hands-on approach to developing key professional skills therefore involves • preparing and planning lessons and units of work, • realistic target setting • administrative skills such as reporting and recording, • assessment / testing and • planning for differentiation. By the end of the course you should be familiar with key requirements of lesson planning and teaching as well as the underlying principles of language learning.
Exercises 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Master of Education
3.02.011 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Tuesday: 14:15 - 15:45, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.073 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Tuesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Bachelor
3.02.004 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Tuesday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.990 S Little Women Through the Ages: Film Adaptations of Louisa May Alcott's Classic Children's Story Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Greta Gerwig’s 2019 film adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s "Little Women" (1868) is the latest of numerous adaptations for the theater, television, and film. Indeed, the novel’s many cross-medial adaptations have not only contributed to the continuing appeal of the 19th-century children’s classic, each of them has also provided its very own interpretation and added yet another layer of meaning to the 19th-century novel. Alongside our study of Alcott’s children’s classic itself, this class focuses on the four feature films from 1933, 1949, 1994, and 2019. The course aims to familiarize students with central theoretical aspects of the adaptation of novels into films in order to develop an understanding of the specific variation, accentuation, and interpretation, which each of these film adaptations has produced under changing cultural, historical, and cinematic contexts. Please purchase and read Louisa May Alcott’s "Little Women" (1868) [part I & II] - preferably the Norton critical edition from 2004, edited by Anne K. Phillips and Gregory Eiselein. Furthermore, please purchase and watch the 1994 film versions directed by Gillian Armstrong and Greta Gerwig’s 2019 version. The 1933 adaptation with Katharine Hepburn, directed by George Cukor and Mervyn Leroy’s 1949 feature film can be accessed at https://archive.org/details/LittleWomen1933 and https://archive.org/details/LittleWomen1949 respectively. Additional reading materials will be made available on Stud.IP at the beginning of the semester. Greta Gerwig’s 2019 film adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s "Little Women" (1868) is the latest of numerous adaptations for the theater, television, and film. Indeed, the novel’s many cross-medial adaptations have not only contributed to the continuing appeal of the 19th-century children’s classic, each of them has also provided its very own interpretation and added yet another layer of meaning to the 19th-century novel. Alongside our study of Alcott’s children’s classic itself, this class focuses on the four feature films from 1933, 1949, 1994, and 2019. The course aims to familiarize students with central theoretical aspects of the adaptation of novels into films in order to develop an understanding of the specific variation, accentuation, and interpretation, which each of these film adaptations has produced under changing cultural, historical, and cinematic contexts. Please purchase and read Louisa May Alcott’s "Little Women" (1868) [part I & II] - preferably the Norton critical edition from 2004, edited by Anne K. Phillips and Gregory Eiselein. Furthermore, please purchase and watch the 1994 film versions directed by Gillian Armstrong and Greta Gerwig’s 2019 version. The 1933 adaptation with Katharine Hepburn, directed by George Cukor and Mervyn Leroy’s 1949 feature film can be accessed at https://archive.org/details/LittleWomen1933 and https://archive.org/details/LittleWomen1949 respectively. Additional reading materials will be made available on Stud.IP at the beginning of the semester.
Seminar 2 PD Dr. Michaela Keck
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.130 S Living on the Waterfront: Regionalism and Liminality in Representations of East Anglia and the Fens Wednesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Christian Lassen
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.90.350 EMMIR Focus Module "Forced Migration, Gender and Post- conflict Setting in East Africa" (MM32.4/Semester 3) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - Gast Dozent
Dr. Lydia Potts
  • Master
3.02.040 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Thursday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses
Exercises 2 Prof. Dr. Anton Kirchhofer
  • Bachelor
3.02.201 S Multiculturalism and Literature Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 19/10/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. Sylke Bakker
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.058 TUT Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Wednesday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.402 Ü English for Educational Purposes Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 19/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Lauren Freede
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.313 DS Directed Studies Wednesday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Miscellaneous 2 Dr. Galena Hashhozheva
  • Bachelor
3.02.175 V Methods in Language Use, Variation and Change Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
The lecture “Methods in Language Variation and Change” accompanies one of the linguistic seminars in ang617/ang618 and is meant for students registered for these courses to develop basic methodological skills in the topic areas of language variation and change. Unlike many other disciplines in the humanities, linguistics has a very empirical research tradition. To get the data needed for empirical research, there are various methods of data collection which all come with a number of limitations and advantages. In this course, we will introduce and evaluate different methods of data collection, making you familiar with the advantages and disadvantages of them all and discuss critically the suitability for your research questions. In the lecture, we will guide students to develop different methodological skills and competences, such as: - the ability to formulate a valid (and manageable) research question - the ability to choose the appropriate approach to answering this research question (i.e. e.g. qualitative vs. quantitative research) - the ability to choose the appropriate method(s) of data collection to answer this question - the ability to choose the appropriate participants/ language corpus to answer this question - the ability to analyse the data - the ability to choose and present relevant results - the ability to structure linguistic papers - etc. The course is meant to give you a hands-on experience in working empirically yourself – from developing a research question to analysing and presenting your data. Therefore, the teaching methods in this course will vary from regular lectures in the first part to (individual) counselling and consultation about your own projects (be it posters, term papers or other kinds of examination). Students who registered for one of the linguistic seminars in ang617 also need to register for this lecture. The lecture “Methods in Language Variation and Change” accompanies one of the linguistic seminars in ang617/ang618 and is meant for students registered for these courses to develop basic methodological skills in the topic areas of language variation and change. Unlike many other disciplines in the humanities, linguistics has a very empirical research tradition. To get the data needed for empirical research, there are various methods of data collection which all come with a number of limitations and advantages. In this course, we will introduce and evaluate different methods of data collection, making you familiar with the advantages and disadvantages of them all and discuss critically the suitability for your research questions. In the lecture, we will guide students to develop different methodological skills and competences, such as: - the ability to formulate a valid (and manageable) research question - the ability to choose the appropriate approach to answering this research question (i.e. e.g. qualitative vs. quantitative research) - the ability to choose the appropriate method(s) of data collection to answer this question - the ability to choose the appropriate participants/ language corpus to answer this question - the ability to analyse the data - the ability to choose and present relevant results - the ability to structure linguistic papers - etc. The course is meant to give you a hands-on experience in working empirically yourself – from developing a research question to analysing and presenting your data. Therefore, the teaching methods in this course will vary from regular lectures in the first part to (individual) counselling and consultation about your own projects (be it posters, term papers or other kinds of examination). Students who registered for one of the linguistic seminars in ang617 also need to register for this lecture.
Lecture 2 Dr. Ilka Flöck
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.02.007 TUT Principles of Language Teaching and Learning Part I Wednesday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
3.02.501 Ü Vorbereitung der Praxisphase GHR 300 im Unterrichtsfach Englisch Friday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 23/10/20)

Description:
Exercises - Edeltraud Breiter
Alexandra Köhler
Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Master of Education
3.02.077 Ü Introduction to Integrated Language Studies Wednesday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 21/10/20)

Description:
The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.) The course "Introduction to Integrated Language Studies" provides an introduction to the practical study of the English language at university level. Class work will include practical language sessions, written homework items, a referenced essay, and a set of electronic grammar assignments to be completed throughout the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to develop both their receptive and productive language skills. This will involve listening practice (including many varieties of English); reading and writing (covering a variety of genres relevant for university work); and speaking, with special emphasis on communicative effectiveness and academic register. The homework and class exercises will also lead to a diagnostic evaluation of English proficiency and advice for further self-study. Assessment for the course is via a portfolio on a pass-fail basis. You must pass all the portfolio items in order to pass the course. Materials for the course will be provided via Stud.IP, and students will be given suggestions for grammar reference works and dictionaries at the start of the semester. * * * LANGUAGE AIMS During the course, students will work towards achieving the following advanced-level competencies according to the Common European Framework of Reference: Listening -Understanding extended speech, lectures and news reports, even those containing complex lines of argument, in both standard dialects and other varieties of English. Reading -Understanding long and complex factual and literary texts; appreciating distinctions of style. Writing -Expressing ideas in clear, well-structured text; expressing points of view on complex subjects at some length with a(n academic) style appropriate to the reader. Speaking -Expressing ideas, accounting for and sustaining opinions and taking an active part in discussions fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. (Note that speaking plays a larger role in the second half of the course.)
Exercises 2 Dr. Rachel Ramsay
  • Bachelor
3.02.140 S Colonial Gothic Friday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 23/10/20)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr. des. Karsten Levihn-Kutzler
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
3.90.330 EMMIR Focus Module "Representation, Ethnicity and Nation State" (MM32.2/Semester 3) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - Gast Dozent
  • Master
3.02.057 TUT Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Tuesday: 18:15 - 19:45, weekly (from 20/10/20)

Description:
Tutorial 2 Clara Sophie Schenck
  • Bachelor
3.02.931 S Lexical Semantics Thursday: 17:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 22/10/20)

Description:
Seminar 3 Prof. Dr. Ronald Geluykens
  • Master of Education
  • Master
3.02.042 SÜ Introduction to the Critical and Scholarly Discussion of Literature Friday: 12:15 - 13:45, weekly (from 23/10/20)

Description:
Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses Cf. this course in the wiki: http://wiki.angl-am.uni-oldenburg.de/index.php/Courses
Exercises 2 Dr. phil. Anna Auguscik
  • Bachelor
3.02.602 Ü Begleitveranstaltung für TutorInnen der Anglistik/ Amerikanistik: Fachdidaktik Friday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 23/10/20)

Description:
Exercises 2 Christian Kramer, M.A.
  • Bachelor
  • Master
132 Seminars

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