Veranstaltungsverzeichnis

Veranstaltungsverzeichnis

School of Computing Science, Business Administration, Economics and Law Click here for PDF-Download

Summer semester 2024 74 Seminars
VAK Course Number Title Type Lecture
Preliminary studies
Advanced courses
Practical course
Colloquium
Research group
Workgroup
Project group
Council conference
Internship
Language course
Subject didactics
Excursion
Tutorial
Committee
SWS Semester weekly hours Teachers Degree
2.02.981 Advanced Financial Accounting Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 18/04/24)

Description:
Students have to understand the theoretical orientation and the institutional structure of financial accounting and standard setting. Many important standards, such as fair value accounting, financial instruments, reserve recognition accounting, management discussion and analysis, employee stock options, impairment tests, hedge accounting, derecognition, consolidation, and comprehensive income, will be analyzed and critically evaluated from students. This course aims to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the underlying accounting concepts and accounting standards governing the preparation of financial statements under International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) for external users. Furthermore it develop students' conceptual skills and professional competence in financial accounting in compliance with the regulatory and financial framework under IFRS. Students have to understand the theoretical orientation and the institutional structure of financial accounting and standard setting. Many important standards, such as fair value accounting, financial instruments, reserve recognition accounting, management discussion and analysis, employee stock options, impairment tests, hedge accounting, derecognition, consolidation, and comprehensive income, will be analyzed and critically evaluated from students. This course aims to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the underlying accounting concepts and accounting standards governing the preparation of financial statements under International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) for external users. Furthermore it develop students' conceptual skills and professional competence in financial accounting in compliance with the regulatory and financial framework under IFRS.
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Christoph Sextroh
  • Master of Education
  • Master
2.01.369-A Selected topics in nanomechanics and the mechanical characterization of nanomaterials using microscopy Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
The functionality of biomimetic reversable adhesives, ultra-high strength nanocomposites, piezoelectric nanogenerators, electromechanical contact switches, mechanical resonators, as well as ultra-sensitive force and chemical sensors is dependent on nanomechanical phenomena. To experimentally investigate nanomechanical phenomena, nanorobotics and microscopy tools are combined and exploited. A variety of topics within the field of nanomechanics and related experimental methods and tools are presented in an introductory lecture. Students select a topic that they are most interested in to carry out individual work. Topics can be more theoretically or practically orientated depending on the curiosity of the student. Students can also propose their own topics. Students can also be provided with the opportunity to conduct laboratory work, including carrying out nanomanipulation using optical or scanning electron microscopes. In the second half of semester, each student will give a lecture or presentation on their selected topic, and will be provided feedback on both their content and communication skills. Learning objectives: • Acquire knowledge in the field of nanomechanics, including: o fundamental concepts in the mechanic properties of materials, o the advantages, challenges, and application of nanomaterials, o microscopy and nanohandling basics and their application towards studying the mechanics of nanomaterials o insights into the state of the art in nanomechanics research. • Further develop research and communication skills through self-directed reading and presentations. The functionality of biomimetic reversable adhesives, ultra-high strength nanocomposites, piezoelectric nanogenerators, electromechanical contact switches, mechanical resonators, as well as ultra-sensitive force and chemical sensors is dependent on nanomechanical phenomena. To experimentally investigate nanomechanical phenomena, nanorobotics and microscopy tools are combined and exploited. A variety of topics within the field of nanomechanics and related experimental methods and tools are presented in an introductory lecture. Students select a topic that they are most interested in to carry out individual work. Topics can be more theoretically or practically orientated depending on the curiosity of the student. Students can also propose their own topics. Students can also be provided with the opportunity to conduct laboratory work, including carrying out nanomanipulation using optical or scanning electron microscopes. In the second half of semester, each student will give a lecture or presentation on their selected topic, and will be provided feedback on both their content and communication skills. Learning objectives: • Acquire knowledge in the field of nanomechanics, including: o fundamental concepts in the mechanic properties of materials, o the advantages, challenges, and application of nanomaterials, o microscopy and nanohandling basics and their application towards studying the mechanics of nanomaterials o insights into the state of the art in nanomechanics research. • Further develop research and communication skills through self-directed reading and presentations.
Seminar 2 Dr. James Mead
  • Master
2.01.900-F Project Group "AIM - Artificial Intelligence for Multimodal & Multisensor Applications" The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
- Lecturers: Aliki Anagnostopoulou, Michael Barz, Prof. Dr. Daniel Sonntag - Contact: Aliki Anagnostopoulou - Teaching language: English - Lecturers: Aliki Anagnostopoulou, Michael Barz, Prof. Dr. Daniel Sonntag - Contact: Aliki Anagnostopoulou - Teaching language: English
Practical training - Prof. Dr. Daniel Sonntag
  • Master
2.02.821 International Trade and Transnational Production Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Hans-Michael Trautwein
  • Master
2.02.030 Energy Markets and Policy Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 02/04/24), Location: A05 0-055
Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 04/04/24), Location: V03 0-E003

Description:
This is a 6 ECTS course designed to provide students with an introduction to the principles of energy economics and related policy applications. Energy is the lifeblood of industrial economies, and also a key factor in environmental and national security problems. Because of the extensive externalities associated with energy use, and the uneven distribution of energy resources around the globe, balancing the benefits and costs of energy use is one of the major challenges facing humanity. This balancing act involves blending markets and public policy in such a way as to align the incentives of businesses and individuals with the greater good of people and the planet. In several jurisdictions, the marketplace plays the predominant role in determining what energy sources are used, and how. But government policy – at the local, national, regional, and international levels – plays an extremely important role in molding aspects of energy policy. This course covers the economic tools for analyzing institutions and driving forces of energy markets, including coal, crude oil, gasoline/diesel, natural gas, and electricity with a focus on understanding supply and demand changes as well as the motives and consequences of policy or regulatory interventions. Students will be introduced to the environmental implications of energy use and the role of economic analysis in designing policies that address issues of pollution and climate change, and the distributive consequences of energy and climate policies. Throughout the course, theoretical discussions will be complemented with empirical evidence and research that explores different aspects of the energy markets to help students better understand the respective energy markets. Ancillary objectives of the course include supporting students in developing research topics and introducing them to academic writing. To this end, students will develop some expertise in working with real-world energy data and policies and writing a research paper. Learning Outcome: Upon completion of this course, it is expected that students are able to: 1. Analyze the fundamentals of energy markets, including demand and supply, market structure, and pricing mechanisms 2. Understand the rationales and instruments for policy intervention in energy markets and be able to critically evaluate current energy policies based on sound economic principles 3. Evaluate the role of government policies in shaping energy markets, including regulatory approaches, taxes, and subsidies for renewable energy 4. Understand the environmental, economic, and geopolitical implications of energy production and consumption The course starts with a series of lectures on selected topics. The lecture sessions aim to facilitate the development of students’ understanding of the economic theory related to the various energy markets. Students will also be guided to develop their research projects during the first half of the semester. At the start of the second part of the course, students will present their tentative research projects and receive input from instructors. They will then use the remaining period to work on their research projects with the support of instructors. Students will present their work in a scientific conference format towards the end of the semester and submit the final term paper afterward. This is a 6 ECTS course designed to provide students with an introduction to the principles of energy economics and related policy applications. Energy is the lifeblood of industrial economies, and also a key factor in environmental and national security problems. Because of the extensive externalities associated with energy use, and the uneven distribution of energy resources around the globe, balancing the benefits and costs of energy use is one of the major challenges facing humanity. This balancing act involves blending markets and public policy in such a way as to align the incentives of businesses and individuals with the greater good of people and the planet. In several jurisdictions, the marketplace plays the predominant role in determining what energy sources are used, and how. But government policy – at the local, national, regional, and international levels – plays an extremely important role in molding aspects of energy policy. This course covers the economic tools for analyzing institutions and driving forces of energy markets, including coal, crude oil, gasoline/diesel, natural gas, and electricity with a focus on understanding supply and demand changes as well as the motives and consequences of policy or regulatory interventions. Students will be introduced to the environmental implications of energy use and the role of economic analysis in designing policies that address issues of pollution and climate change, and the distributive consequences of energy and climate policies. Throughout the course, theoretical discussions will be complemented with empirical evidence and research that explores different aspects of the energy markets to help students better understand the respective energy markets. Ancillary objectives of the course include supporting students in developing research topics and introducing them to academic writing. To this end, students will develop some expertise in working with real-world energy data and policies and writing a research paper. Learning Outcome: Upon completion of this course, it is expected that students are able to: 1. Analyze the fundamentals of energy markets, including demand and supply, market structure, and pricing mechanisms 2. Understand the rationales and instruments for policy intervention in energy markets and be able to critically evaluate current energy policies based on sound economic principles 3. Evaluate the role of government policies in shaping energy markets, including regulatory approaches, taxes, and subsidies for renewable energy 4. Understand the environmental, economic, and geopolitical implications of energy production and consumption The course starts with a series of lectures on selected topics. The lecture sessions aim to facilitate the development of students’ understanding of the economic theory related to the various energy markets. Students will also be guided to develop their research projects during the first half of the semester. At the start of the second part of the course, students will present their tentative research projects and receive input from instructors. They will then use the remaining period to work on their research projects with the support of instructors. Students will present their work in a scientific conference format towards the end of the semester and submit the final term paper afterward.
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Emmanuel Asane-Otoo
Laura Schürer
  • Master
2.02.071 Sustainable Supply Chain Management Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)
Dates on Thursday, 18.04.2024 10:00 - 12:00

Description:
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Christian Busse
Satwant Dahiya
  • Master
2.03.009 Competition Law and Intellectual Property I Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
Teil I Teil I
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Christine Godt
  • Master
2.01.809 Selected Topics in IT-Security Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
/// Goals of the course /// At the end of the course, students will be able to * analyze the technical merits of specific developments within the field of IT-security, * substantiate their analyses using existing and scientific documented knowledge, * clearly write up those analyses in a concise scientific report, and * further develop an attitude in which being able to clearly explain matters is geared to optimize the quality of feedback. /// Course contents /// The course contents consist of studying and assessing a specific topic in the field of IT-security. There will be multiple topics, and each topic is to be tackled by an individual student. Students will be handed out material such as scientific articles to help them understand the topic at hand. Part of the course consists of discovering additional material. Students will dig deep into the selected topic. Students will present their analyses and findings in two ways: in a concise scientific report as well as in a 20 min. presentation, which is followed by a discussion and a round of feedback. In the start of the course, all available topics will be introduced to the students so that they can pick a for them suitable topic. /// Assessment /// Students will be assessed on the basis of their written scientific report (high weight), their presentation and consequent discussion (medium to high weight), and the general process (low weight; includes: independence, planning, active involvement, …) /// Topics /// * Malicious software * Security operations centers and their performance * Weaknesses of the RSA cryptosystem * Zero-knowledge proofs (ZKPs) * Online tracking methods and countermeasures * Privacy in instant messaging * Privacy metrics and ways to achieve certain privacy levels * Your own topic More details will follow. /// Goals of the course /// At the end of the course, students will be able to * analyze the technical merits of specific developments within the field of IT-security, * substantiate their analyses using existing and scientific documented knowledge, * clearly write up those analyses in a concise scientific report, and * further develop an attitude in which being able to clearly explain matters is geared to optimize the quality of feedback. /// Course contents /// The course contents consist of studying and assessing a specific topic in the field of IT-security. There will be multiple topics, and each topic is to be tackled by an individual student. Students will be handed out material such as scientific articles to help them understand the topic at hand. Part of the course consists of discovering additional material. Students will dig deep into the selected topic. Students will present their analyses and findings in two ways: in a concise scientific report as well as in a 20 min. presentation, which is followed by a discussion and a round of feedback. In the start of the course, all available topics will be introduced to the students so that they can pick a for them suitable topic. /// Assessment /// Students will be assessed on the basis of their written scientific report (high weight), their presentation and consequent discussion (medium to high weight), and the general process (low weight; includes: independence, planning, active involvement, …) /// Topics /// * Malicious software * Security operations centers and their performance * Weaknesses of the RSA cryptosystem * Zero-knowledge proofs (ZKPs) * Online tracking methods and countermeasures * Privacy in instant messaging * Privacy metrics and ways to achieve certain privacy levels * Your own topic More details will follow.
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Andreas Peter
  • Bachelor
2.02.991a Banking Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

Description:
We will discuss theoretical foundations of financial intermediation in general, and of banking in particular as well as the economic, institutional, and regulatory context in which financial institutions operate today. Moreover, we will cover selected topics in the area of bank management and bank accounting. We will discuss theoretical foundations of financial intermediation in general, and of banking in particular as well as the economic, institutional, and regulatory context in which financial institutions operate today. Moreover, we will cover selected topics in the area of bank management and bank accounting.
Seminar - Dr. Haoshen Hu
Prof. Dr. Jörg Prokop
  • Master of Education
  • Master
2.01.5124 Research Project Digitalised Energy Systems The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Lecture - Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Andreas Rauh
Prof. Dr. Sebastian Lehnhoff
Prof. Dr. Astrid Nieße
Jörg Bremer
  • Master
2.02.831 EU Medical Law Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
Seminar - Dr.Jur. Victoria Chege, LL.M.Eur.
  • Master
2.02.073 Sustainable Supply Chain Management Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Christian Busse
Satwant Dahiya
  • Master
2.02.151 Financial Accounting Friday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 05/04/24), Location: A14 1-101 (Hörsaal 1), (online)
Dates on Friday, 12.07.2024 12:00 - 13:00, Friday, 11.10.2024 08:00 - 09:00, Location: A07 0-030 (Hörsaal G), A11 1-101 (Hörsaal B), A14 1-101 (Hörsaal 1) (+2 more)

Description:
This module is based on accounting and annual financial statement, while focusing exclusively on the international financial reporting standards (IFRS). In terms of content, the course covers subjects such as the most important concepts, tangible and intangible assets as well as liability items on the basis of the fundamental standards and case studies. This module is based on accounting and annual financial statement, while focusing exclusively on the international financial reporting standards (IFRS). In terms of content, the course covers subjects such as the most important concepts, tangible and intangible assets as well as liability items on the basis of the fundamental standards and case studies.
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Christoph Sextroh
  • Bachelor
  • Master
2.01.697 Current Issues on Digital Transformation in the Energy Sector and Green Information Systems Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
In this module, current research topics related to digital transformation in the energy sector and Green Information Systems are taught, and their relevance for both academia and practical applications is discussed. Through the discussion and reflection on various scientific publications in these subject areas, fundamental insights into understanding research findings and methodological competencies are conveyed. Specifically, these contributions cover the following thematic areas (among others): • (New) Business Models in the Energy Sector • Acceptance and (Non-)Utilization of Sustainable Technologies • Digitalization of Energy Research • Research Data Management in the Energy Sector • Open Science in Energy Research Subject Competencies Students: • are able to comprehend works in the mentioned area and thus can reflect on the current state of research in this field. Methodological Competencies Students: • can understand and discuss scholarly works in the context of the topic. Social Competencies Students: • collaborate in small groups (or individually) to develop an understanding as well as possible further research approaches with appropriate research methodologies related to given scholarly works in the field. • discuss their own understanding and research approaches with others. • reflect on the solutions of fellow students in a constructive manner. Self-Competencies Students: • assess scientific developments for their relevance to practitioners. • identify potential topics for further scholarly works, such as the master's thesis. In this module, current research topics related to digital transformation in the energy sector and Green Information Systems are taught, and their relevance for both academia and practical applications is discussed. Through the discussion and reflection on various scientific publications in these subject areas, fundamental insights into understanding research findings and methodological competencies are conveyed. Specifically, these contributions cover the following thematic areas (among others): • (New) Business Models in the Energy Sector • Acceptance and (Non-)Utilization of Sustainable Technologies • Digitalization of Energy Research • Research Data Management in the Energy Sector • Open Science in Energy Research Subject Competencies Students: • are able to comprehend works in the mentioned area and thus can reflect on the current state of research in this field. Methodological Competencies Students: • can understand and discuss scholarly works in the context of the topic. Social Competencies Students: • collaborate in small groups (or individually) to develop an understanding as well as possible further research approaches with appropriate research methodologies related to given scholarly works in the field. • discuss their own understanding and research approaches with others. • reflect on the solutions of fellow students in a constructive manner. Self-Competencies Students: • assess scientific developments for their relevance to practitioners. • identify potential topics for further scholarly works, such as the master's thesis.
Seminar 2 Dr. Oliver Werth
  • Master
2.02.994 Financial Risk Management Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 02/04/24), Location: A05 0-054
Dates on Wednesday, 10.07.2024 08:00 - 10:00, Location: V03 0-D002

Description:
The course provides insights into the theory and practice of modern financial business risk management, including: • the concept of risk, types of financial risks, and approaches to risk measurement; • the mechanics of financial markets, including derivatives markets; • the properties of selected financial instruments, including financial derivatives such as forwards, futures, options, and swaps; • tools and techniques for managing financial risks. The course provides insights into the theory and practice of modern financial business risk management, including: • the concept of risk, types of financial risks, and approaches to risk measurement; • the mechanics of financial markets, including derivatives markets; • the properties of selected financial instruments, including financial derivatives such as forwards, futures, options, and swaps; • tools and techniques for managing financial risks.
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Jörg Prokop
Wiebke Clausing
  • Master
2.02.855b Applied Industrial Organization Tuesday: 16:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
VL und Seminare sind kombiniert VL und Seminare sind kombiniert
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Cristian Huse
  • Bachelor
2.02.991 Banking Monday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 08/04/24), Location: A05 0-056
Dates on Monday, 08.07.2024 10:00 - 12:00, Location: A11 1-101 (Hörsaal B)

Description:
We will discuss theoretical foundations of financial intermediation in general, and of banking in particular as well as the economic, institutional, and regulatory context in which financial institutions operate today. Our focus will be on a European perspective, including the Eurpean Central Bank's monetary policy instruments as well as the regulatory framework set by Basel III. We will discuss theoretical foundations of financial intermediation in general, and of banking in particular as well as the economic, institutional, and regulatory context in which financial institutions operate today. Our focus will be on a European perspective, including the Eurpean Central Bank's monetary policy instruments as well as the regulatory framework set by Basel III.
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Jörg Prokop
Dr. Haoshen Hu
  • Master of Education
  • Master
2.01.5456 Applied AI - Multimodal-Multisensor Interfaces 1: Foundations, User Modeling, and Common Modality Combination The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
We look at relevant theory and neuroscience foundations for guiding the development of high-performance systems. We discuss approaches to user modeling, interface design that supports user choice, synergistic combination of modalities with sensors, and blending of multimodal input and output. We also highlight an in-depth look at the most common multimodal-multisensor combinations- for example, touch and pen input, haptic and non-speech audio output, and speech co-processed with visible lip movements, gaze, gestures, or pen input. A common theme throughout is support for mobility and individual differences among users-including the world's rapidly growing population of seniors. This seminar would be most appropriate for graduate students, and of primary interest to students studying computer science and information technology, human–computer interfaces, mobile and ubiquitous interfaces, and related multidisciplinary majors. Central part of the seminar is the reference book "The Handbook of Multimodal-Multisensor Interfaces: Signal Processing, Architectures, and Detection of Emotion and Cognition - Volume 1" (https://dl.acm.org/doi/book/10.1145/3015783). At the beginning there will be an introduction to the subject. Everyone will receive a chapter, for which a presentation (30 min. + 30 min. discussion) and a written elaboration (5-10 pages) are to be prepared. Contact: Ilira Troshani, ilira.troshani@uni-oldenburg.de We look at relevant theory and neuroscience foundations for guiding the development of high-performance systems. We discuss approaches to user modeling, interface design that supports user choice, synergistic combination of modalities with sensors, and blending of multimodal input and output. We also highlight an in-depth look at the most common multimodal-multisensor combinations- for example, touch and pen input, haptic and non-speech audio output, and speech co-processed with visible lip movements, gaze, gestures, or pen input. A common theme throughout is support for mobility and individual differences among users-including the world's rapidly growing population of seniors. This seminar would be most appropriate for graduate students, and of primary interest to students studying computer science and information technology, human–computer interfaces, mobile and ubiquitous interfaces, and related multidisciplinary majors. Central part of the seminar is the reference book "The Handbook of Multimodal-Multisensor Interfaces: Signal Processing, Architectures, and Detection of Emotion and Cognition - Volume 1" (https://dl.acm.org/doi/book/10.1145/3015783). At the beginning there will be an introduction to the subject. Everyone will receive a chapter, for which a presentation (30 min. + 30 min. discussion) and a written elaboration (5-10 pages) are to be prepared. Contact: Ilira Troshani, ilira.troshani@uni-oldenburg.de
Seminar - Rida Saghir
Ilira Troshani
Hannes Kath
Prof. Dr. Daniel Sonntag
  • Master
2.02.351 International Economics Dates on Tuesday, 09.04.2024 18:00 - 20:00, Thursday, 04.07.2024 09:00 - 18:00, Friday, 05.07.2024 09:00 - 12:00, Friday, 05.07.2024 12:00 - 18:00, Location: V03 0-D001, V03 0-C001, V03 0-E004 (+1 more)
Description:
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Hans-Michael Trautwein
Dr. Anelise Rahmeier Seyffarth
  • Bachelor
2.13.042 Field-trip: Bremen The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Study trip - Prof. Dr. Ingo Mose
  • Master
2.02.1002 Advanced Managerial Accounting Thursday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 18/04/24), Location: A14 1-103 (Hörsaal 3), A10 1-121 (Hörsaal F)

Description:
- Theory and concept of managerial accounting - Profit planning - Budgeting - Ratios and financial analysis - Operating performance measures - Cash flow and segment reporting - paper discussion on current and special issues. - Theory and concept of managerial accounting - Profit planning - Budgeting - Ratios and financial analysis - Operating performance measures - Cash flow and segment reporting - paper discussion on current and special issues.
Exercises - Prof. Dr. Christoph Sextroh
  • Master of Education
  • Master
2.01.AM-56 Oberseminar Applied Artificial Intelligence The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Your Advisor and Your Committee In order to write a bachelor’s or master’s thesis you must find a member of the IML lab who is willing to be your thesis advisor. You propose your thesis topic together with your advisor to Prof. Sonntag as the first reviewer in your committee. How Long Should it Be? How Long Does it Take? A bachelor’s thesis is generally 20-40 pages, not including the bibliography. A master’s thesis is generally 40-80 pages, not including the bibliography. However, the length will vary according to the topic and the method of analysis, so the appropriate length will be determined by you, your advisor, and your committee. Students who write a master’s thesis generally do so over two semesters, bachelor’s one semester. More information: https://iml.dfki.de/teaching/writing-a-thesis/ Your Advisor and Your Committee In order to write a bachelor’s or master’s thesis you must find a member of the IML lab who is willing to be your thesis advisor. You propose your thesis topic together with your advisor to Prof. Sonntag as the first reviewer in your committee. How Long Should it Be? How Long Does it Take? A bachelor’s thesis is generally 20-40 pages, not including the bibliography. A master’s thesis is generally 40-80 pages, not including the bibliography. However, the length will vary according to the topic and the method of analysis, so the appropriate length will be determined by you, your advisor, and your committee. Students who write a master’s thesis generally do so over two semesters, bachelor’s one semester. More information: https://iml.dfki.de/teaching/writing-a-thesis/
Seminar - Michael Barz, M. Sc.
Prof. Dr. Daniel Sonntag
Ilira Troshani
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
2.12.283 Applied Economic Policy using EXCEL/GAMS Dates on Monday, 25.03.2024 - Thursday, 28.03.2024 10:00 - 17:00
Description:
This course is voluntary and supports students to learn fundamentals of the GAMS programming language that is used in the associated course "Computational Economics". This course is voluntary and supports students to learn fundamentals of the GAMS programming language that is used in the associated course "Computational Economics".
Exercises - Lukas Riesenbeck
Laura Schürer
  • Master
2.02.005 MA-Kolloquium VWL / Environmental & Energy Economics The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Colloquium - Prof. Dr. Emmanuel Asane-Otoo
  • Master
2.01.369 Selected Topics in Microwave-Microscopy and -Communication Systems Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 03/04/24)

Description:
Seminar 2 Dr.-Ing. Muhammad Yasir
  • Master
2.02.1162 Economy in China Dates on Wednesday, 10.04.2024 18:00 - 20:00, Wednesday, 24.04.2024, Wednesday, 15.05.2024, Wednesday, 29.05.2024, Wednesday, 12.06.2024, Wednesday, 26.06.2024 16:00 - 20:00
Description:
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Hans-Michael Trautwein
  • Master
2.02.1211 Topics in Economic Research: History of Economic Thought Wednesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 03/04/24)

Description:
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Hans-Michael Trautwein
  • Master
2.03.022 Comparative Tort Law Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 02/04/24), Location: A09 0-018
Dates on Friday, 07.06.2024 - Saturday, 08.06.2024 10:00 - 16:30, Tuesday, 09.07.2024 15:00 - 18:00, Location: V03 0-C001, A05 0-054, A07 0-030 (Hörsaal G)

Description:
Lecture - Jörg-Alexander Cordes, LL.M.
Tobias Pinkel
Soraya Hammou
  • Bachelor
2.02.361 Umweltökonomie/Environmental Economics Tuesday: 12:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 02/04/24), Location: A10 1-121 (Hörsaal F)
Dates on Tuesday, 09.07.2024 12:00 - 16:00, Location: A05 0-054

Description:
Lecture - Thomas Handke
Prof. Dr. Cristian Huse
  • Bachelor
  • Master
2.03.018 Judicial Protection and fundamental Freedoms in the EU Monday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 08/04/24), Location: A05 0-056
Dates on Tuesday, 25.06.2024 13:00 - 16:00, Monday, 08.07.2024 10:00 - 13:00, Location: V02 0-004, A04 2-221

Description:
2. Semester Hanse Law School BA 2. Semester Hanse Law School BA
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Christine Godt
Anne Klemeyer, LL.M.
  • Bachelor
2.01.368 Microrobotics Selected Topics Friday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 05/04/24)

Description:
This seminar is an addition to the main lecture series “2.01.208 Mikrorobotik und Mikrosystemtechnik” Topics - Swimming MR - Flying MR - MR for surface locomotion - Gecko MR - Soft MR - On-chip MR - In-vivo MR - Bacteria- and Cell-MR - MR Swarms - Molecular MR This seminar is an addition to the main lecture series “2.01.208 Mikrorobotik und Mikrosystemtechnik” Topics - Swimming MR - Flying MR - MR for surface locomotion - Gecko MR - Soft MR - On-chip MR - In-vivo MR - Bacteria- and Cell-MR - MR Swarms - Molecular MR
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Sergej Fatikow
  • Master
2.03.004 Internal Market Law Harmonisation and Competition Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Christine Godt
  • Bachelor
2.01.5128 AI in Energy Systems Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

Description:
Seminar 2 Jörg Bremer
  • Master
2.03.019 Übung Fundamental Freedoms and Judicial Protection Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 09/04/24), Beamer, Location: A05 1-159, A05 0-054, (entfällt)
Dates on Wednesday, 17.04.2024 12:00 - 14:00, Tuesday, 25.06.2024 13:00 - 16:00, Monday, 08.07.2024 10:00 - 13:00, Location: A05 0-055, (V02 0-004), (A04 2-221)

Description:
Exercises - Anne Klemeyer, LL.M.
Prof. Dr. Christine Godt
  • Bachelor
2.01.814-B Computing on Encrypted Data The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
// Goals of the course /// At the end of the course, students will be able to * analyze the technical merits of specific developments regarding secure computation methods on encrypted data, * substantiate their analyses using existing and scientific documented knowledge, * clearly write up those analyses in a concise scientific report, and * further develop an attitude in which being able to clearly explain matters is geared to optimize the quality of feedback. /// Course contents /// The course contents consist of studying and assessing a specific method of secure computation on encrypted data. Each available topic is to be tackled by an individual student. For this purpose students will be provided with material such as scientific articles to help them understand the topic at hand. Part of the course consists of discovering additional material. Students will dig deep into the selected topic. Finally, students will present their analyses and findings in two ways: in a concise scientific report as well as in a 20 min. presentation, which is followed by a discussion and a round of feedback. At the beginning of the course, all available topics will be introduced to the students so that they can pick a topic suitable for them. /// Assessment /// Students will be assessed on the basis of their written scientific report (high weight), their presentation and consequent discussion (medium to high weight), and the general process (low weight; includes: independence, planning, active involvement, …) /// Topics /// * Hardware Acceleration for Homomorpic Encryption; * Funtional Encryption; * NTRU-based Homomorphic Encryption; * Threshold and Multiparty Homomorphic Encryption; * Hybrid Homomorphic Encryption; * Functional Secret Sharing; * Your Own Topic; More details on the topics will follow. // Goals of the course /// At the end of the course, students will be able to * analyze the technical merits of specific developments regarding secure computation methods on encrypted data, * substantiate their analyses using existing and scientific documented knowledge, * clearly write up those analyses in a concise scientific report, and * further develop an attitude in which being able to clearly explain matters is geared to optimize the quality of feedback. /// Course contents /// The course contents consist of studying and assessing a specific method of secure computation on encrypted data. Each available topic is to be tackled by an individual student. For this purpose students will be provided with material such as scientific articles to help them understand the topic at hand. Part of the course consists of discovering additional material. Students will dig deep into the selected topic. Finally, students will present their analyses and findings in two ways: in a concise scientific report as well as in a 20 min. presentation, which is followed by a discussion and a round of feedback. At the beginning of the course, all available topics will be introduced to the students so that they can pick a topic suitable for them. /// Assessment /// Students will be assessed on the basis of their written scientific report (high weight), their presentation and consequent discussion (medium to high weight), and the general process (low weight; includes: independence, planning, active involvement, …) /// Topics /// * Hardware Acceleration for Homomorpic Encryption; * Funtional Encryption; * NTRU-based Homomorphic Encryption; * Threshold and Multiparty Homomorphic Encryption; * Hybrid Homomorphic Encryption; * Functional Secret Sharing; * Your Own Topic; More details on the topics will follow.
Seminar - Valentin Reyes Häusler
Prof. Dr. Andreas Peter
  • Master
2.12.282 Computational Economics Monday: 12:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

Description:
Computer-based simulations play a key role for quantifying the economic impacts of policy reforms. Among numerical simulation methods, computable partial equilibrium (CPE) models are widely used in applied economic analysis. These models build on microeconomic theory for describing supply and demand behavior of economic agents on markets. Students will learn how to program such models and apply them to the impact assessment of trade, fiscal, or environmental policies. In the course, we start from basic microeconomic theory to describe the supply-side and demand-side responses on economic markets triggered by regulatory policy measures such as taxes or subsidies. We then translate simple theoretical models into computable partial equilibrium (CPE) models and use empirical data for model parametrization. Subsequently, the CPE models are used to quantify the economic efficiency impacts and the economic incidence of policy instruments such as taxes, subsidies, standards or quotas. For the implementation of the simulation models on the students’ PC we will learn a powerful state-of-the-art modeling language called GAMS (Generic Algebraic Modeling System) which initially had been developed for World Bank economists. The fundamental strength of GAMS lies in the ease with which algebraic models in economics and management (or other sciences) can be formulated and solved. Students enrolled to the course will receive a free GAMS license. For the examination, the students will be requested to adapt a basic market model towards a policy issue of their choice and provide a small written essay (max. 10 pages) on their applied analysis. For this, the students can team up in groups with 2 people and hand in their essay until the end of the summer semester. Computer-based simulations play a key role for quantifying the economic impacts of policy reforms. Among numerical simulation methods, computable partial equilibrium (CPE) models are widely used in applied economic analysis. These models build on microeconomic theory for describing supply and demand behavior of economic agents on markets. Students will learn how to program such models and apply them to the impact assessment of trade, fiscal, or environmental policies. In the course, we start from basic microeconomic theory to describe the supply-side and demand-side responses on economic markets triggered by regulatory policy measures such as taxes or subsidies. We then translate simple theoretical models into computable partial equilibrium (CPE) models and use empirical data for model parametrization. Subsequently, the CPE models are used to quantify the economic efficiency impacts and the economic incidence of policy instruments such as taxes, subsidies, standards or quotas. For the implementation of the simulation models on the students’ PC we will learn a powerful state-of-the-art modeling language called GAMS (Generic Algebraic Modeling System) which initially had been developed for World Bank economists. The fundamental strength of GAMS lies in the ease with which algebraic models in economics and management (or other sciences) can be formulated and solved. Students enrolled to the course will receive a free GAMS license. For the examination, the students will be requested to adapt a basic market model towards a policy issue of their choice and provide a small written essay (max. 10 pages) on their applied analysis. For this, the students can team up in groups with 2 people and hand in their essay until the end of the summer semester.
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Christoph Böhringer
  • Master
2.01.950 Exploring Research Data Management Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)
Thursday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
In this course students will learn about different methods of research data management. Students are introduced to the topics of: - research data, - digital research objects, - data management plans, - data management services, - the FAIR criteria (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) for digital research object and how to fulfill them, - Open Science. They will learn about the importance of data management when working together as groups, as well as when working alone, and how to plan their data management for different research scenarios. After the course, the students will be able to handle different types of digital research objects in a reproducible and FAIR way. They will know about different digital research objects such as electronic lab notes, csv, research software etc. Goals of the course: Students will be able to identify data in its different forms. They will be able to identify different types of digital research objects that will be collected in a research project and analyze the project to come up with a fitting data management plan. They will be able to identify the data lifecycle and plan accordingly to ensure that data is preserved when needed. Furthermore, students will be familiarized with the term research data management, research data services and different tools to aid in research data management. Students learn about the FAIR criteria and how to create digital research objects which fulfill these criteria. In this course students will learn about different methods of research data management. Students are introduced to the topics of: - research data, - digital research objects, - data management plans, - data management services, - the FAIR criteria (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) for digital research object and how to fulfill them, - Open Science. They will learn about the importance of data management when working together as groups, as well as when working alone, and how to plan their data management for different research scenarios. After the course, the students will be able to handle different types of digital research objects in a reproducible and FAIR way. They will know about different digital research objects such as electronic lab notes, csv, research software etc. Goals of the course: Students will be able to identify data in its different forms. They will be able to identify different types of digital research objects that will be collected in a research project and analyze the project to come up with a fitting data management plan. They will be able to identify the data lifecycle and plan accordingly to ensure that data is preserved when needed. Furthermore, students will be familiarized with the term research data management, research data services and different tools to aid in research data management. Students learn about the FAIR criteria and how to create digital research objects which fulfill these criteria.
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Astrid Nieße
Stephan Alexander Ferenz, M. Sc.
Thomas Wolgast, M. Sc.
M. Sc. Alexandro Steinert
Graduate School OLTECH
  • Master
2.13.075 Earth System Governance Monday: 10:00 - 14:00, fortnightly (from 08/04/24), Location: A10 1-121 (Hörsaal F)
Dates on Tuesday, 30.04.2024 12:00 - 14:00, Location: V03 0-D001

Description:
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Bernd Siebenhüner
Dr. Hendrik Wolter
Sophie Berg
  • Master
2.02.856 Advanced Econometrics Tuesday: 12:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Cristian Huse
  • Master
2.02.383 Economic Growth Tuesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 02/04/24), Location: A14 1-112, (nach Absprache)
Dates on Monday, 08.07.2024 10:00 - 10:30, Location: A07 0-030 (Hörsaal G)

Description:
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Jürgen Bitzer
  • Bachelor
2.02.195 Environment and Inequality: Socioeconomic Linkages and Policy Instruments Monday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

Description:
Inequality and environmental matters are multidimensional, intertwined and complex. They might unfold self-enforcing negative effects on human wel- fare and wellbeing. In this sense, they affect economic growth, development, environment, education, health, social and political stability, etc. The current trends of inequality within and between countries are worrisome. At the same time, global warming and climate change severely and unequally affect human’s wellbeing and economies. Understanding and tackling these pressing problems should therefore be among the priorities of economists. Reducing poverty and inequality as well as fighting climate change are central elements of the sustainable development goals (2030 Agenda) and rank high in most policy agendas. However, while some policy measures designed to reduce poverty and inequality could negatively affect the environment, environmen- tal policies often cause undesirable distributional effects. The distributive ef- fects (‘incidence’) of environmental policies are indeed becoming increasingly important for the political feasibility of environmental policies addressing e.g. climate change or biodiversity loss. Against this background, a more holistic approach integrating climate actions with measures to reduce poverty and inequality is needed. In this course, we study these issues applying and extending state-of-the-art economic methods. Particularly, we consider insights of behavioral economics in order to provide a deeper and more integrated analysis of these highly intertwined themes. Inequality and environmental matters are multidimensional, intertwined and complex. They might unfold self-enforcing negative effects on human wel- fare and wellbeing. In this sense, they affect economic growth, development, environment, education, health, social and political stability, etc. The current trends of inequality within and between countries are worrisome. At the same time, global warming and climate change severely and unequally affect human’s wellbeing and economies. Understanding and tackling these pressing problems should therefore be among the priorities of economists. Reducing poverty and inequality as well as fighting climate change are central elements of the sustainable development goals (2030 Agenda) and rank high in most policy agendas. However, while some policy measures designed to reduce poverty and inequality could negatively affect the environment, environmen- tal policies often cause undesirable distributional effects. The distributive ef- fects (‘incidence’) of environmental policies are indeed becoming increasingly important for the political feasibility of environmental policies addressing e.g. climate change or biodiversity loss. Against this background, a more holistic approach integrating climate actions with measures to reduce poverty and inequality is needed. In this course, we study these issues applying and extending state-of-the-art economic methods. Particularly, we consider insights of behavioral economics in order to provide a deeper and more integrated analysis of these highly intertwined themes.
Lecture - Dr. Anelise Rahmeier Seyffarth
  • Bachelor
2.02.862 Development Economics Dates on Saturday, 22.06.2024 08:00 - 16:00
Description:
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Erkan Gören
Prof. Dr. Jürgen Bitzer
  • Master
2.02.861 Development Economics Monday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

Description:
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Jürgen Bitzer
Prof. Dr. Erkan Gören
  • Master
2.02.196 Environment and Inequality: Socioeconomic Linkages and Policy Instruments Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, fortnightly (from 16/04/24)
Dates on Friday, 12.07.2024 - Saturday, 13.07.2024 09:00 - 18:00

Description:
Inequality and environmental matters are multidimensional, intertwined and complex. They might unfold self-enforcing negative effects on human wel- fare and wellbeing. In this sense, they affect economic growth, development, environment, education, health, social and political stability, etc. The current trends of inequality within and between countries are worrisome. At the same time, global warming and climate change severely and unequally affect human’s wellbeing and economies. Understanding and tackling these pressing problems should therefore be among the priorities of economists. Reducing poverty and inequality as well as fighting climate change are central elements of the sustainable development goals (2030 Agenda) and rank high in most policy agendas. However, while some policy measures designed to reduce poverty and inequality could negatively affect the environment, environmental policies often cause undesirable distributional effects. The distributive effects (‘incidence’) of environmental policies are indeed becoming increasingly important for the political feasibility of environmental policies addressing e.g. climate change or biodiversity loss. Against this background, a more holistic approach integrating climate actions with measures to reduce poverty and inequality is needed. In this course, we study these issues applying and extending state-of-the-art economic methods. Particularly, we consider insights of behavioral economics in order to provide a deeper and more integrated analysis of these highly intertwined themes. Inequality and environmental matters are multidimensional, intertwined and complex. They might unfold self-enforcing negative effects on human wel- fare and wellbeing. In this sense, they affect economic growth, development, environment, education, health, social and political stability, etc. The current trends of inequality within and between countries are worrisome. At the same time, global warming and climate change severely and unequally affect human’s wellbeing and economies. Understanding and tackling these pressing problems should therefore be among the priorities of economists. Reducing poverty and inequality as well as fighting climate change are central elements of the sustainable development goals (2030 Agenda) and rank high in most policy agendas. However, while some policy measures designed to reduce poverty and inequality could negatively affect the environment, environmental policies often cause undesirable distributional effects. The distributive effects (‘incidence’) of environmental policies are indeed becoming increasingly important for the political feasibility of environmental policies addressing e.g. climate change or biodiversity loss. Against this background, a more holistic approach integrating climate actions with measures to reduce poverty and inequality is needed. In this course, we study these issues applying and extending state-of-the-art economic methods. Particularly, we consider insights of behavioral economics in order to provide a deeper and more integrated analysis of these highly intertwined themes.
Seminar - Dr. Anelise Rahmeier Seyffarth
  • Bachelor
2.02.350 International Economics Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

Description:
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Hans-Michael Trautwein
Dr. Anelise Rahmeier Seyffarth
  • Bachelor
2.01.5454 Current Topics in Artificial Intelligence for Health Friday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 05/04/24)

Description:
This seminar is supposed to cover current publications and/or research topics in the domain of machine learning with particular regard to applications in the health domain. This includes topics with a strong methodological focus (such as self-supervised learning, quality criteria for ML algorithms such as interpretability/uncertainty quantification) but also medical application topics. The seminar will be held in a roleplaying format where students present on specific aspects of the paper under consideration which will then be discussed in the whole group in biweekly meetings. This seminar is supposed to cover current publications and/or research topics in the domain of machine learning with particular regard to applications in the health domain. This includes topics with a strong methodological focus (such as self-supervised learning, quality criteria for ML algorithms such as interpretability/uncertainty quantification) but also medical application topics. The seminar will be held in a roleplaying format where students present on specific aspects of the paper under consideration which will then be discussed in the whole group in biweekly meetings.
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Nils Strodthoff
Juan Lopez Alcaraz
  • Master
2.02.1161 Culture in China Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 04/04/24), Location: V03 3-S326, V03 0-D001, V03 0-C001

Description:
Pflichtmodul Master WiRe "China-Schwerpunkt" Pflichtmodul Master WiRe "China-Schwerpunkt"
Lecture - Hongrui Wang
  • Master
2.02.1001 Advanced Managerial Accounting Thursday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
- Theory and concept of managerial accounting - Profit planning - Budgeting - Ratios and financial analysis - Operating performance measures - Cash flow and segment reporting - paper discussion on current and special issues. - Theory and concept of managerial accounting - Profit planning - Budgeting - Ratios and financial analysis - Operating performance measures - Cash flow and segment reporting - paper discussion on current and special issues.
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Christoph Sextroh
  • Master of Education
  • Master
2.03.010 Competition Law and Intellectual Property II Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
Teil II Teil II
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Christine Godt
  • Master
2.01.586 Privacy-preserving Data-driven Optimization Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
Seminar 2 Prof. Dr. Sebastian Lehnhoff
Jörg Bremer
  • Master
2.02.227 Complex Data Analysis Wednesday: 10:00 - 12:00, weekly (from 03/04/24)

Description:
Lecture - PD Dr. Ralf Werner Stecking
  • Master
2.02.228 Exercise: Complex Data Analysis Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
Exercises - PD Dr. Ralf Werner Stecking
  • Master
2.02.832 Maritime Law Monday: 16:00 - 18:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

Description:
Seminar - Angeline Asangire Oprong
  • Master
2.12.042 Ecological Economics Monday: 10:00 - 14:00, fortnightly (from 15/04/24), Location: A10 1-121 (Hörsaal F)
Dates on Monday, 08.04.2024 10:00 - 14:00, Tuesday, 30.04.2024 10:00 - 12:00, Location: V03 0-D001, (A10 Hörsaal F (bei VA 2.12.075))

Description:
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Bernd Siebenhüner
Dr. Hendrik Wolter
  • Master
5.03.216 Exkursion: Harz The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Während der Exkursion in den Harz werden neben Einblicken die Geschichte der Region (u.a. Bergbau, Wasserwirtschaft), die Themen Waldzustand, Waldentwicklung unter unterschiedlichen Schutzgebietskategorien und Nutzungskonflikte behandelt (Windkraft, Holzwirtschaft, Tourismus und Naturschutz). Akteure verschiedener Einrichtungen werden vor Ort ihre Sicht auf die Themen vortragen. Touren werden u.a. durch den Nationalpark Harz und auf den Brocken führen. Die Übernachtungsmöglichkeiten konnten aufgrund der noch nicht vollständigen Terminplanungen und der schwierigen ÖPNV-Verbindungen im Harz noch nicht reserviert werden. Daher ist u. U. auch die Nutzung von Camps / Campingplätzen oder Wandererheimen eine Option. Ggf. sind dafür ein Zelt, eine Isomatte und ein Schlafsack mitzubringen. Letzteres wird versucht zu vermeiden. Der Harz ist hügelig und es werden einige längere Strecken zurückgelegt. Normale Kondition sollte vorhanden sein. - Weitere Infos zum ersten Treffpunkt vor Ort (vermutlich Bhf. Goslar) usw. folgen sobald alle Termine stehen. Während der Exkursion in den Harz werden neben Einblicken die Geschichte der Region (u.a. Bergbau, Wasserwirtschaft), die Themen Waldzustand, Waldentwicklung unter unterschiedlichen Schutzgebietskategorien und Nutzungskonflikte behandelt (Windkraft, Holzwirtschaft, Tourismus und Naturschutz). Akteure verschiedener Einrichtungen werden vor Ort ihre Sicht auf die Themen vortragen. Touren werden u.a. durch den Nationalpark Harz und auf den Brocken führen. Die Übernachtungsmöglichkeiten konnten aufgrund der noch nicht vollständigen Terminplanungen und der schwierigen ÖPNV-Verbindungen im Harz noch nicht reserviert werden. Daher ist u. U. auch die Nutzung von Camps / Campingplätzen oder Wandererheimen eine Option. Ggf. sind dafür ein Zelt, eine Isomatte und ein Schlafsack mitzubringen. Letzteres wird versucht zu vermeiden. Der Harz ist hügelig und es werden einige längere Strecken zurückgelegt. Normale Kondition sollte vorhanden sein. - Weitere Infos zum ersten Treffpunkt vor Ort (vermutlich Bhf. Goslar) usw. folgen sobald alle Termine stehen.
Study trip - Dr. rer. nat. Christian Aden
  • Master
2.01.801-D Forschungsseminar Applied Artificial Intelligence (Bachelor/Masterseminar) The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
Seminar - Michael Barz, M. Sc.
Prof. Dr. Daniel Sonntag
Ilira Troshani
  • Bachelor
2.02.833 Marine Law Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

Description:
Seminar - Angeline Asangire Oprong
  • Master
2.02.232 Corporate Finance Tuesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 02/04/24), Location: A07 0-030 (Hörsaal G)
Dates on Friday, 19.07.2024 14:30 - 15:30, Thursday, 10.10.2024 08:00 - 09:00, Location: A11 1-101 (Hörsaal B), A14 1-101 (Hörsaal 1), A14 1-102 (Hörsaal 2) (+1 more)

Description:
This course is an introduction to corporate finance. It covers typical tools and techniques used by financial managers in making investment and financing decisions, and it provides insights into their theoretical foundations. The concept of time value of money and net present value is discussed in detail, first under certainty, and then in the presence of uncertainty. We will examine the relationship between an investment’s risk and its return, and discuss ways to derive risk-adjusted cost of equity capital. In addition, the course provides insights into firms’ main sources of equity and debt financing, like shares, bonds, bank loans, or private equity. The topics covered in the course are relevant to decision-making in various areas of business management, including operations management, marketing, and in particular corporate strategy. This course is an introduction to corporate finance. It covers typical tools and techniques used by financial managers in making investment and financing decisions, and it provides insights into their theoretical foundations. The concept of time value of money and net present value is discussed in detail, first under certainty, and then in the presence of uncertainty. We will examine the relationship between an investment’s risk and its return, and discuss ways to derive risk-adjusted cost of equity capital. In addition, the course provides insights into firms’ main sources of equity and debt financing, like shares, bonds, bank loans, or private equity. The topics covered in the course are relevant to decision-making in various areas of business management, including operations management, marketing, and in particular corporate strategy.
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Jörg Prokop
  • Bachelor
  • Master of Education
  • Master
2.02.845 Applied Econometrics Using GIS Techniques (Lecture) Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)
Dates on Saturday, 06.07.2024 08:00 - 16:00

Description:
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Erkan Gören
  • Bachelor
  • Master
2.01.5458 Applied AI - Multimodal-Multisensor Interfaces 2: Signal Processing, Architectures, and Detection of Emotion and Cognition The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
We begin with multimodal signal processing, architectures, and machine learning. It includes recent deep-learning approaches for processing multisensorial and multimodal user data and interaction, as well as context-sensitivity. A further highlight is processing of information about users' states and traits, an exciting emerging capability in next-generation user interfaces. We discuss real-time multimodal analysis of emotion and social signals from various modalities and perception of affective expression by users. Then we discuss multimodal processing of cognitive state using behavioral and physiological signals to detect cognitive load, domain expertise, deception, and depression. This collection of chapters provides walk-through examples of system design and processing, information on tools and practical resources for developing and evaluating new systems, and terminology, and tutorial support for mastering this rapidly expanding field. Finally, we look at experts' exchange views on the timely and controversial challenge topic of multimodal deep learning. The discussion focuses on how multimodal-multisensor interfaces are most likely to advance human performance during the next decade. This seminar is most appropriate for graduate students and of primary interest to students studying computer science and information technology, human-computer interfaces, mobile and ubiquitous interfaces, affective and behavioral computing, machine learning, and related multidisciplinary majors. Central part of the seminar is the reference book "The Handbook of Multimodal-Multisensor Interfaces: Signal Processing, Architectures, and Detection of Emotion and Cognition - Volume 2" (https://dl.acm.org/doi/book/10.1145/3107990). At the beginning there will be an introduction to the subject. Everyone will receive a chapter, for which a presentation (30 min. + 30 min. discussion) and a written elaboration (5-10 pages) are to be prepared. Contact: Hannes Kath, hannes.kath@uni-oldenburg.de We begin with multimodal signal processing, architectures, and machine learning. It includes recent deep-learning approaches for processing multisensorial and multimodal user data and interaction, as well as context-sensitivity. A further highlight is processing of information about users' states and traits, an exciting emerging capability in next-generation user interfaces. We discuss real-time multimodal analysis of emotion and social signals from various modalities and perception of affective expression by users. Then we discuss multimodal processing of cognitive state using behavioral and physiological signals to detect cognitive load, domain expertise, deception, and depression. This collection of chapters provides walk-through examples of system design and processing, information on tools and practical resources for developing and evaluating new systems, and terminology, and tutorial support for mastering this rapidly expanding field. Finally, we look at experts' exchange views on the timely and controversial challenge topic of multimodal deep learning. The discussion focuses on how multimodal-multisensor interfaces are most likely to advance human performance during the next decade. This seminar is most appropriate for graduate students and of primary interest to students studying computer science and information technology, human-computer interfaces, mobile and ubiquitous interfaces, affective and behavioral computing, machine learning, and related multidisciplinary majors. Central part of the seminar is the reference book "The Handbook of Multimodal-Multisensor Interfaces: Signal Processing, Architectures, and Detection of Emotion and Cognition - Volume 2" (https://dl.acm.org/doi/book/10.1145/3107990). At the beginning there will be an introduction to the subject. Everyone will receive a chapter, for which a presentation (30 min. + 30 min. discussion) and a written elaboration (5-10 pages) are to be prepared. Contact: Hannes Kath, hannes.kath@uni-oldenburg.de
Seminar - Rida Saghir
Ilira Troshani
Hannes Kath
Prof. Dr. Daniel Sonntag
  • Master
2.12.284 Public Economics and Market Design Monday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 08/04/24), Location: V03 0-E003
Tuesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 02/04/24), Location: S 2-205
Dates on Wednesday, 26.06.2024 08:00 - 13:00, Location: V03 0-C001

Description:
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Carsten Helm
  • Master
2.02.982 Advanced Financial Accounting Thursday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 04/04/24)

Description:
Students have to understand the theoretical orientation and the institutional structure of financial accounting and standard setting. Many important standards, such as fair value accounting, financial instruments, reserve recognition accounting, management discussion and analysis, employee stock options, impairment tests, hedge accounting, derecognition, consolidation, and comprehensive income, will be analyzed and critically evaluated from students. This course aims to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the underlying accounting concepts and accounting standards governing the preparation of financial statements under International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) for external users. Furthermore it develop students' conceptual skills and professional competence in financial accounting in compliance with the regulatory and financial framework under IFRS. Students have to understand the theoretical orientation and the institutional structure of financial accounting and standard setting. Many important standards, such as fair value accounting, financial instruments, reserve recognition accounting, management discussion and analysis, employee stock options, impairment tests, hedge accounting, derecognition, consolidation, and comprehensive income, will be analyzed and critically evaluated from students. This course aims to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the underlying accounting concepts and accounting standards governing the preparation of financial statements under International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) for external users. Furthermore it develop students' conceptual skills and professional competence in financial accounting in compliance with the regulatory and financial framework under IFRS.
Exercises - Prof. Dr. Christoph Sextroh
  • Master of Education
  • Master
2.02.384 Economic Growth Dates on Friday, 14.06.2024 08:00 - 18:00
Description:
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Jürgen Bitzer
  • Bachelor
2.03.110 Legal English (C1) für die Hanse Law School Monday: 18:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

Description:
Lecture - Jörg-Alexander Cordes, LL.M.
in Bearbeitung
  • Bachelor
2.02.993 Financial Risk Management Wednesday: 08:00 - 10:00, weekly (from 03/04/24)

Description:
The course provides insights into the theory and practice of modern financial business risk management, including: • the concept of risk, types of financial risks, and approaches to risk measurement; • the mechanics of financial markets, including derivatives markets; • the properties of selected financial instruments, including financial derivatives such as forwards, futures, options, and swaps; • tools and techniques for managing financial risks. The course provides insights into the theory and practice of modern financial business risk management, including: • the concept of risk, types of financial risks, and approaches to risk measurement; • the mechanics of financial markets, including derivatives markets; • the properties of selected financial instruments, including financial derivatives such as forwards, futures, options, and swaps; • tools and techniques for managing financial risks.
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Jörg Prokop
Dr. Christoph Lippert
  • Master
2.02.846 Applied Econometrics Using GIS Techniques (Exercise) Wednesday: 14:00 - 16:00, weekly (from 03/04/24)

Description:
Exercises - Prof. Dr. Erkan Gören
  • Bachelor
  • Master
2.02.855a Applied Industrial Organization Tuesday: 16:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 02/04/24), Location: A14 0-030, V03 0-C003

Description:
VL und Seminare sind kombiniert VL und Seminare sind kombiniert
Lecture - Prof. Dr. Cristian Huse
  • Bachelor
2.02.822 Economic Transformation and Integration Dates on Tuesday, 09.04.2024 18:00 - 20:00, Thursday, 27.06.2024, Friday, 05.07.2024 09:00 - 18:00, Location: V03 0-C003, JJW 1-112
Description:
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Hans-Michael Trautwein
  • Master
2.01.814-A Advances in Security & Privacy The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
// Goals of the course /// At the end of the course, students will be able to * analyze the technical merits of specific developments within the field of IT-security, * substantiate their analyses using existing and scientific documented knowledge, * clearly write up those analyses in a concise scientific report, and * further develop an attitude in which being able to clearly explain matters is geared to optimize the quality of feedback. /// Course contents /// The course contents consist of studying and assessing a specific topic from the fields of security and/or privacy. There will be multiple topics, and each topic is to be tackled by an individual student. Students will be handed out material such as scientific articles to help them understand the topic at hand. Part of the course consists of discovering additional material. Students will dig deep into the selected topic. Students will present their analyses and findings in two ways: in a concise scientific report as well as in a 20 min. presentation, which is followed by a discussion and a round of feedback. In the start of the course, all available topics will be introduced to the students so that they can pick a for them suitable topic. /// Assessment /// Students will be assessed on the basis of their written scientific report (high weight), their presentation and consequent discussion (medium to high weight), and the general process (low weight; includes: independence, planning, active involvement, …) /// Topics /// Explainable Machine Learning in Security Attacks on Searchable Encrypted Databases and Countermeasures (Semi-)Automated Security Event Handling in Security Operations Centers Post-Quantum Encryption Algorithms Interplay of Safety and Security Mobile-App Fingerprinting on Encrypted Network Traffic Biometric Template Protection Automated Extraction of Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures from Cyber Threat Reports Your Own Topic More details on the topics will follow. // Goals of the course /// At the end of the course, students will be able to * analyze the technical merits of specific developments within the field of IT-security, * substantiate their analyses using existing and scientific documented knowledge, * clearly write up those analyses in a concise scientific report, and * further develop an attitude in which being able to clearly explain matters is geared to optimize the quality of feedback. /// Course contents /// The course contents consist of studying and assessing a specific topic from the fields of security and/or privacy. There will be multiple topics, and each topic is to be tackled by an individual student. Students will be handed out material such as scientific articles to help them understand the topic at hand. Part of the course consists of discovering additional material. Students will dig deep into the selected topic. Students will present their analyses and findings in two ways: in a concise scientific report as well as in a 20 min. presentation, which is followed by a discussion and a round of feedback. In the start of the course, all available topics will be introduced to the students so that they can pick a for them suitable topic. /// Assessment /// Students will be assessed on the basis of their written scientific report (high weight), their presentation and consequent discussion (medium to high weight), and the general process (low weight; includes: independence, planning, active involvement, …) /// Topics /// Explainable Machine Learning in Security Attacks on Searchable Encrypted Databases and Countermeasures (Semi-)Automated Security Event Handling in Security Operations Centers Post-Quantum Encryption Algorithms Interplay of Safety and Security Mobile-App Fingerprinting on Encrypted Network Traffic Biometric Template Protection Automated Extraction of Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures from Cyber Threat Reports Your Own Topic More details on the topics will follow.
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Andreas Peter
  • Master
2.02.834 International Regime of Health Policy Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 02/04/24)

Description:
Seminar - Dr.Jur. Victoria Chege, LL.M.Eur.
  • Master
2.02.362 Umweltpolitik/Environmental Policy Dates on Friday, 28.06.2024, Friday, 05.07.2024 08:00 - 16:00
Description:
Seminar - Prof. Dr. Cristian Huse
Thomas Handke
  • Bachelor
  • Master
2.02.823 Inequality and Environmental Policy Thursday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 11/04/24)
Dates on Friday, 06.09.2024 15:00 - 20:00, Saturday, 07.09.2024 10:00 - 20:00, Sunday, 08.09.2024 10:00 - 18:00

Description:
Motivation and background: The distributive effects (‘incidence’) of environmental policies are becoming increasingly important for the political feasibility of environmental policies addressing e.g. climate change or biodiversity loss. The protest of the yellow vests that stopped Macrons petrol tax due to the expected distributional consequences are a prominent example. Also in Germany the incidence of environmental policies such as the coal exit, a pesticide tax or a land value tax is of high concern in public debates. The need for stringent environmental policies comes at a time where many countries of the world have become becoming increasingly unequal in the distribution of income and wealth. In Germany for example, the Gini index of disposable income increased from 0.25 in the 1980s to 0.293 in 2015. Therefore, the acceptance and political feasibility of environmental policies depends not only on their aggregate costs, but also on their distributional effects. On the global stage the trends are slightly different, but the challenge remains the same. Global income inequality has fallen over the last decades but the impact of fundamental global environmental changes caused by human action will have increasingly strong distributional effects not only within but also between countries. Therefore, also the (economic) resources for adaptation and mitigation strategies against climate change must be distributed within and between countries. While economics as a discipline has focused mainly on efficiency in the past, policy makers are frequently more concerned with distributive effects and justice. In this course, we aim at learning and extending state-of-the-art environmental economics methods to analyze, understand and manage the distributional implications of environmental policies and enable students to apply these to real world cases. Aims and scope: In this course, we will study the multifaceted relationships between inequality and environmental policy. The course starts with a series of lectures on inequality, distribute justice and environmental policy instruments. Thereby students will be encouraged and supported to stepwise develop their own project. This could be for instance an analysis of the distributive effects of the diesel car ban in German cities, pesticide taxes, the German coal exit or energy turn, house prices in urban centers or biodiversity loss. Further topics include the distribution of risks related to climate change, macroeconomic consequences of environmental policies or multilateral action against climate change in an unequal world. Students will present sketches for their projects early on. In the following seminar weeks student have time to work on their project under the support by the lectures. Finally, in a two days block course students will present their project in a scientific conference style and mutually review their papers. Motivation and background: The distributive effects (‘incidence’) of environmental policies are becoming increasingly important for the political feasibility of environmental policies addressing e.g. climate change or biodiversity loss. The protest of the yellow vests that stopped Macrons petrol tax due to the expected distributional consequences are a prominent example. Also in Germany the incidence of environmental policies such as the coal exit, a pesticide tax or a land value tax is of high concern in public debates. The need for stringent environmental policies comes at a time where many countries of the world have become becoming increasingly unequal in the distribution of income and wealth. In Germany for example, the Gini index of disposable income increased from 0.25 in the 1980s to 0.293 in 2015. Therefore, the acceptance and political feasibility of environmental policies depends not only on their aggregate costs, but also on their distributional effects. On the global stage the trends are slightly different, but the challenge remains the same. Global income inequality has fallen over the last decades but the impact of fundamental global environmental changes caused by human action will have increasingly strong distributional effects not only within but also between countries. Therefore, also the (economic) resources for adaptation and mitigation strategies against climate change must be distributed within and between countries. While economics as a discipline has focused mainly on efficiency in the past, policy makers are frequently more concerned with distributive effects and justice. In this course, we aim at learning and extending state-of-the-art environmental economics methods to analyze, understand and manage the distributional implications of environmental policies and enable students to apply these to real world cases. Aims and scope: In this course, we will study the multifaceted relationships between inequality and environmental policy. The course starts with a series of lectures on inequality, distribute justice and environmental policy instruments. Thereby students will be encouraged and supported to stepwise develop their own project. This could be for instance an analysis of the distributive effects of the diesel car ban in German cities, pesticide taxes, the German coal exit or energy turn, house prices in urban centers or biodiversity loss. Further topics include the distribution of risks related to climate change, macroeconomic consequences of environmental policies or multilateral action against climate change in an unequal world. Students will present sketches for their projects early on. In the following seminar weeks student have time to work on their project under the support by the lectures. Finally, in a two days block course students will present their project in a scientific conference style and mutually review their papers.
Seminar - Lukas Riesenbeck
Laura Schürer
  • Master
2.01.5460 Applied AI - Multimodal-Multisensor Interfaces 3: Language Processing, Software, Commercialization, and Emerging Directions The course times are not decided yet.
Description:
This third seminar takes the contents of the first two seminars—namely, the motivations, foundational concepts, basic modality combinations, component analyses, and recognition and fusion techniques—to the next level. MMI 3 discusses how to design and build functioning multimodal-multisensor systems that can sustain real-world use. This seminar is most appropriate for graduate students and of primary interest to students studying computer science and information technology, human-computer interfaces, mobile and ubiquitous interfaces, affective and behavioral computing, machine learning, and related multidisciplinary majors. It is very useful if you want to work on practical applications, transfer of AI technology to application domains such as medicine and healthcare, and industrial prototypes. Afterward, students might engage in a hands-on project in which they design, build, and evaluate the performance of a multimodal system in our project group MMI II (https://elearning.uni-oldenburg.de/dispatch.php/course/details?sem_id=098bd500a63e723551364c7f921755b5&again=yes). Central part of the seminar is the reference book "The Handbook of Multimodal-Multisensor Interfaces: Language Processing, Software, Commercialization, and Emerging Directions - Volume 3" (https://dl.acm.org/doi/book/10.1145/3233795). At the beginning there will be an introduction to the subject. Everyone will receive a chapter, for which a presentation (30 min. + 30 min. discussion) and a written elaboration (5-10 pages) are to be prepared. Contact: Rida Saghir, rida.saghir@uni-oldenburg.de This third seminar takes the contents of the first two seminars—namely, the motivations, foundational concepts, basic modality combinations, component analyses, and recognition and fusion techniques—to the next level. MMI 3 discusses how to design and build functioning multimodal-multisensor systems that can sustain real-world use. This seminar is most appropriate for graduate students and of primary interest to students studying computer science and information technology, human-computer interfaces, mobile and ubiquitous interfaces, affective and behavioral computing, machine learning, and related multidisciplinary majors. It is very useful if you want to work on practical applications, transfer of AI technology to application domains such as medicine and healthcare, and industrial prototypes. Afterward, students might engage in a hands-on project in which they design, build, and evaluate the performance of a multimodal system in our project group MMI II (https://elearning.uni-oldenburg.de/dispatch.php/course/details?sem_id=098bd500a63e723551364c7f921755b5&again=yes). Central part of the seminar is the reference book "The Handbook of Multimodal-Multisensor Interfaces: Language Processing, Software, Commercialization, and Emerging Directions - Volume 3" (https://dl.acm.org/doi/book/10.1145/3233795). At the beginning there will be an introduction to the subject. Everyone will receive a chapter, for which a presentation (30 min. + 30 min. discussion) and a written elaboration (5-10 pages) are to be prepared. Contact: Rida Saghir, rida.saghir@uni-oldenburg.de
Seminar - Rida Saghir
Ilira Troshani
Hannes Kath
Prof. Dr. Daniel Sonntag
  • Master
2.02.365 Applied Environmental Economics Tuesday: 16:00 - 20:00, weekly (from 02/04/24), Location: A01 0-006
Dates on Wednesday, 22.05.2024 16:00 - 18:00, Thursday, 23.05.2024, Thursday, 30.05.2024, Thursday, 06.06.2024, Thursday, 20.06.2024 14:00 - 18:00, Tuesday, 16.07.2024 14:15 - 15:45, Tuesday, 23.07.2024 16:00 - 17:30, Location: V03 0-D001, A05 0-055, A05 0-054 (+1 more)

Description:
Lecture - Mirlind Mustafa
Prof. Dr. Cristian Huse
  • Master
74 Seminars

Top