wir361 - Environment and inequality: socioeconomic linkages and policy instruments

wir361 - Environment and inequality: socioeconomic linkages and policy instruments

Department of Business Administration, Economics and Law 6 KP
Module components Semester courses Summer semester 2024 Examination
Lecture
  • Unlimited access 2.02.195 - Environment and Inequality: Socioeconomic Linkages and Policy Instruments Show lecturers
    • Dr. Anelise Rahmeier Seyffarth

    Monday: 12:00 - 14:00, weekly (from 08/04/24)

    Inequality and environmental matters are multidimensional, intertwined and complex. They might unfold self-enforcing negative effects on human wel- fare and wellbeing. In this sense, they affect economic growth, development, environment, education, health, social and political stability, etc. The current trends of inequality within and between countries are worrisome. At the same time, global warming and climate change severely and unequally affect human’s wellbeing and economies. Understanding and tackling these pressing problems should therefore be among the priorities of economists. Reducing poverty and inequality as well as fighting climate change are central elements of the sustainable development goals (2030 Agenda) and rank high in most policy agendas. However, while some policy measures designed to reduce poverty and inequality could negatively affect the environment, environmen- tal policies often cause undesirable distributional effects. The distributive ef- fects (‘incidence’) of environmental policies are indeed becoming increasingly important for the political feasibility of environmental policies addressing e.g. climate change or biodiversity loss. Against this background, a more holistic approach integrating climate actions with measures to reduce poverty and inequality is needed. In this course, we study these issues applying and extending state-of-the-art economic methods. Particularly, we consider insights of behavioral economics in order to provide a deeper and more integrated analysis of these highly intertwined themes.

Seminar
  • Unlimited access 2.02.196 - Environment and Inequality: Socioeconomic Linkages and Policy Instruments Show lecturers
    • Dr. Anelise Rahmeier Seyffarth

    Tuesday: 12:00 - 14:00, fortnightly (from 16/04/24), Location: A05 0-056
    Dates on Friday, 12.07.2024 09:00 - 18:00, Location: A05 1-159

    Inequality and environmental matters are multidimensional, intertwined and complex. They might unfold self-enforcing negative effects on human wel- fare and wellbeing. In this sense, they affect economic growth, development, environment, education, health, social and political stability, etc. The current trends of inequality within and between countries are worrisome. At the same time, global warming and climate change severely and unequally affect human’s wellbeing and economies. Understanding and tackling these pressing problems should therefore be among the priorities of economists. Reducing poverty and inequality as well as fighting climate change are central elements of the sustainable development goals (2030 Agenda) and rank high in most policy agendas. However, while some policy measures designed to reduce poverty and inequality could negatively affect the environment, environmental policies often cause undesirable distributional effects. The distributive effects (‘incidence’) of environmental policies are indeed becoming increasingly important for the political feasibility of environmental policies addressing e.g. climate change or biodiversity loss. Against this background, a more holistic approach integrating climate actions with measures to reduce poverty and inequality is needed. In this course, we study these issues applying and extending state-of-the-art economic methods. Particularly, we consider insights of behavioral economics in order to provide a deeper and more integrated analysis of these highly intertwined themes.

Hinweise zum Modul
Prerequisites
Keine/none
Module examination
Referat
Skills to be acquired in this module
After the course, students should be able to: 
  • understand the relevance of addressing inequality and environmental issues from an economic perspective
  • know the primary measurements and indicators for inequality and environmental issues
  • know the main policy instruments available to tackle inequality and environmental challenges
  • understand the multifaceted relationships between inequality and environmental policy
  • understand and apply state-of-the-art economic methods to analyze the implications of inequality and environmental policies
  • write their research paper on a topic of their choice

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